Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Geomatic Engineering Master Information
Electives
The entire course programs of ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich are open to the students to individual selection.
Electives ETH Zurich
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Recommended Electives of Master Degree Programme
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0459-00LLogistics and Freight TransportationW6 credits4GF. Corman, K. Brossok, D. Bruckmann, M. Ruesch, T. Schmid, A. Trivella
AbstractBasics and concepts of logistics and freight transport; offers, infrastructure and production processes of different transport systems; regulatory framework
ObjectiveIdentification and understanding the interconnections between logistic requirements, market, transport offers, operational processes, transport means and regulation in freight transport of all transport systems (road, rail, intermodal, waterborne and air).
ContentBasics and concepts of logistics, actors in logistics and freight transport, transport demand (1) in-house logistics, storage, transport safety, dangerous goods (2), basics to transport offers, production processes and infrastructure for road, rail, intermodal, waterborne (sea and inland waterways) and air transport, urban logistics (3), transport policy, regulation, spatial planning, location issues and network design with optimization methods (4)
Lecture notesLecture slides in German or English will be provided.
101-0488-01LHuman Powered MobilityW6 credits4GU. Walter, E. Bosina, M. Meeder
AbstractBasics of pedestrian transport planning and planning of cycle traffic facilities,
Transport-related attributes of the human being,
Design of pedestrian and cycle traffic networks,
Pedestrian and cycle traffic facilities,
Microsimulation of pedestrian flows,
Assessment of performance and level of service
ObjectiveAcquirement of basic knowledge in the field of pedestrian and cycle traffic planning,
Knowledge and understanding of the transport-related attributes of human beings and the consequences for the design and planning of appropriate transport facilities,
Ability to assess level of service and performance,
Basic knowledge about pedestrian microsimulation as an up-to-date instrument for planning and analysis
Content1) Introduction to human-powered mobility
2) Characteristics of bicycle transport
3) Principles of bicycle networks
4) Exercise: design of a bicycle network
5) design and development of bicycle traffic facilities
6) Bicycle parking
7) Characteristics of pedestrians, walking speed
8) Quality of traffic conditions and capacity of cycling and walking facilities
9) design and development of pedestrian traffic facilities
10) Configuration and design of pedestrian traffic facilities in public transport hubs
11) Obstacle free traffic areas - Demands of people with disabilities
12) Counting pedestrian and bicycle traffic
13) Pedestrian simulations
14) Technologies for pedestrian micro-simulations
15) Exercise: Design of pedestrian facilities
16) Shared Space
17) Promoting pedestrian and bicycle transport
18) Excursions to selected topics in pedestrian and bicycle transport
Lecture notesSlides and other course materials will be provided on this course's Moodle page.
LiteratureReferences for further reading will be provided during the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeDuring the semester there will be 2 supporting exercises as well as 2 field trips covering pedestrian and bicycle transport.
101-0478-00LMeasurement and Modelling of Travel BehaviourW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen
AbstractComprehensive introduction to survey methods in transport planning and modeling of travel behavior, using advanced discrete choice models.
ObjectiveEnabling the student to understand and apply the various measurement approaches and models of modelling travel behaviour.
ContentBehavioral model and measurement; travel diary, design process, hypothetical markets, discrete choice model, parameter estimation, pattern of travel behaviour, market segments, simulation, advanced discrete choice models
Lecture notesVarious papers and notes are distributed during the course.
103-0798-00LGeodetic Project Course Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 24.
W5 credits9PM. Rothacher, K. Schindler, A. Wieser
AbstractField course with practical geodetic projects (3 weeks)
ObjectiveField course with practical geodetic projects (3 weeks)
ContentSingle-handed treatment of current geodetic projects in groups of 3-5 students. Writing of a technical report with description of the project, calculations, results and interpretations. Possibility to continue the work in a semester or diploma thesis.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe 3-weeks course takes place June 10-28. The first two weeks are dedicated to field work, the 3rd week to finalise the projects in Zurich.
102-0617-01LMethodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing DataW3 credits2GI. Hajnsek, O. Frey, S. Leinss
AbstractThe aim of this course is to get an overview of several methodologies/algorithms for analysis of different sensor specific information products. It is focused at students that like to deepen their knowledge and understanding of remote sensing for environmental applications.
ObjectiveThe course is divided into two main parts, starting with a brief introduction to remote sensing imaging (4 lectures), and is followed by an introduction to different methodologies (8 lectures) for the quantitative estimation of bio-/geo-physical parameters. The main idea is to deepen the knowledge in remote sensing tools in order to be able to understand the information products, with respect to quality and accuracy.
ContentEach lecture will be composed of two parts:
Theory: During the first hour, we go trough the main concepts needed to understand the specific algorithm.
Practice: During the second hour, the student will test/develop the actual algorithm over some real datasets using Matlab. The student will not be asked to write all the code from scratch (especially during the first lectures), but we will provide some script with missing parts or pseudo-code. However, in the later lectures the student is supposed to build up some working libraries.
Lecture notesHandouts for each topic will be provided.
LiteratureSuggested readings:
T. M. Lillesand, R.W. Kiefer, J.W. Chipman, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley & Sons Verlag, 2008
J. R. Jensen, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, Prentice Hall Series in Geograpic Information Science, 2000
103-0427-00LRegional EconomicsW4 credits2GB. Buser, C. Abegg
AbstractThe lecture on Regional Economics focusses on the theoretical aspects of spatial factor allocation and of growth determinants. The course takes a top down stance and looks at regional development from a macroeconomic perspective. Implications of theoretical models on regional and growth policy will be discussed in and connections to the course Site Management will be made.
ObjectiveStudents shall know the theoretical basics of spatial economy and growth theories an a regional scale; they shall gain the competence to apply concepts and theories of spatial science as well as regional economics to concrete problems of their area of study.
ContentOrigin of "Spatial Economics"
Indices of regional economics and growth analysis
Regional advantages in competition and growth theories
Regional innovation theory (innovation processes, cluster theory and innovation policy)
Theory and political implications with examples (New Regional Policy NRP, Regional Innovation Systems RIS)
External Speaker and discussion of topicality by press
Lecture notesDownload two days before lecture: Link

Link
LiteratureLiterature is optional, there will be given hints to:

Bathelt, H., Glückler J. (2012): Wirtschaftsgeographie.
Ökonomische Beziehungen in räumlicher Perspektive. 3. Auflage. ISBN: 978-3-8252-8492-3

Eisenhut, P. (2014): Aktuelle Volkswirtschaftslehre 2018/2019.
Rüegger Verlag, Zürich. ISBN: 978-3-7253-1066-1

Eckey, H.-F. (2008): Regionalökonomie. GWV Fachverlag GmbH, Wiesbaden. ISBN: 978-3-8349-0999-2
101-0193-00LSystemic Design Labs: RE:GENERATE Alpine-Urban Circularity Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2ST. Luthe
AbstractSystemic design (SD) optimizes an entire system as a whole, rather than its parts in isolation. SD is iterative, recursive and circular, requires creative, curious, informed and critical systems thinking and doing, yielding radical resource efficiency. Systems mapping, design thinking, footprint assessment, test planning, prototyping, fabrication, social experiments are part of SD.
ObjectiveThe growing necessity to consider eco-social aspects makes design, planning and engineering practices more complex. Systemic design combines systems thinking skills with design thinking to address such complexity. The objectives of the course are to introduce students to the most important topics in systemic design methods, models, theory and methodology that form the basis for engineering, design and planning practices, and research for sustainability. A main goal is to develop whole systems thinking, life cycle and cradle to cradle thinking, to build knowledge on environmental impacts of materials and processes, and to stimulate overall reflective eco-social thinking in design, planning and engineering disciplines.The teaching purpose of Systemic Design Labs is to better tackle the complexity of today’s sustainability challenges. Often, in current education we learn to disassemble design challenges into their bits and parts for individual optimization. While being useful for developing topical expertise, this reductionism to parts with less emphasis on their interaction does not match with the growing complexity of today’s challenges. In contrast, systemic design approaches a task from a holistic perspective, zooming out of a system to reveal its structure and connections between its parts – to zoom in on the hub of influence that matters most.
ContentDesign Challenge: How to revive mountain livelihoods, focusing on local identity, resilient landscapes and a regenerative economy? The specific design challenge is to identify and layout a holistic, partly quantified and visualized systems strategy for building a resilient community economy on the case of Ostana, Italy, that embraces local identity, revitalizes cultural and landscape biodiversity, and creates alpine-urban circularity. A clear connection is between the local identity (culture, traditions, visions) which is formed by Occitan culture (food, music, dance, language), traditional stone building architecture which is under pressure to carefully evolve with new needs for carbon-neutral and net-positive buildings, and the Monte Viso landscape. How does a re-growing economy that should be regenerative and circular by design, correlate with innovation in architecture, with population growth and associated challenges in mobility, waste systems and supplies, with growing tourism, new agro-forestry practices like industrial hemp and Paulownia, while impacts of climate change are clearly visible? How does the community design a vision that is based on cooperation on different governance scales, balancing local identity and urgently needed international innovation?

Deliverables & output: This SDL course RE:GENERATE builds upon related work from former courses hosted and lead by the MonViso Institute (i.e. on social innovation, mobility, architecture and local identity, tourism, circular economy, land use change) to develop and design foundations for a visualized and partly quantified systems map, that will support ongoing and future innovation processes in this community. Foci are the interplay of architecture, circular economy, land use change, and identity. The map will be accompanied by a detailed report.
Lecture notessee learning materials
Literaturee.g. Striebig, B. and Ogundipe, A. 2016. Engineering Applications in Sustainable Design and Development. ISBN-10: 8131529053.
Jones, P. 2014. Design research methods for systemic design: Perspectives from design education and practice. Proceedings of ISSS 2014, July 28 – Aug1, 2014, Washington, D.C.

Blizzard, J. L. and L. E. Klotz. 2012. A framework for sustainable whole systems design. Design Studies 33(5).

Brown, T. and J. Wyatt. 2010. Design thinking for social innovation. Stanford Social Innovation Review. Stanford University.

Fischer, M. 2015. Design it! Solving Sustainability problems by applying design thinking. GAIA 24/3:174-178.

Luthe, T., Kaegi, T. and J. Reger. 2013. A Systems Approach to Sustainable Technical Product Design. Combining life cycle assessment and virtual development in the case of skis. Journal of Industrial Ecology 17(4), 605-617. DOI: 10.1111/jiec.12000
Prerequisites / NoticePrior to the start of the field course, participants have to prepare a presentation based on pre-given topics.
After the field trip, students have to work alone and in teams on the preparation of the deliverables, a systemic strategy map and a written report.
Seminar Work
Interdisciplinary Project takes only place in autumn semester (HS).
Interdisciplinary Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0298-02LInterdisciplinary Project Restricted registration - show details
Usually in HS. Registration in FS only in exceptional cases. For further information please contact the Study Administration Office Geospatial Engineering early on.
O12 credits24AProfessors
AbstractWorking on a concrete interdisciplinary task in Geomatics
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work in an interdisciplinary context; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe project can be carried out in German upon mutual agreement between supervisor and student.
GESS Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-BAUG
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0009-00LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Before starting the Master's thesis, students must have
a. obtained the Bachelor's degree;
b. fulfilled all specified admission conditions, if any;
c. acquired at least 90 credits in the Master's programme, including 12 credits in the area of the interdisciplinary project.
O24 credits51DSupervisors
AbstractThe Master Programme concludes with the Master Thesis, which has to be done in one of the chosen Majors and has to be completed within 16 weeks. The Master Thesis is supervised by a professor and shall attest the students ability to work independently and to produce scientifically structured work.
ObjectiveTo work independently and to produce a scientifically structured work.
ContentThe topics of the Mastrer Thesis are published by the professors. The Topic can be set also in consultation between the student and the professor.
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0115-AALGeodetic Metrology II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Wieser
AbstractAdvanced studies of the topics of the lecture "Basics of Geodetic Metrology". Knowing important aspects of the practical use of geodetic sensors and the work flows of metrology. Know-how of coordinate calculation methods and statistical aspects of Geodesy.
ObjectiveAdvanced studies of the topics of the lecture "Basics of Geodetic Metrology". Knowing important aspects of the practical use of geodetic sensors and the work flows of metrology. Know-how of coordinate calculation methods and statistical aspects of Geodesy.
ContentApplication and field tests of geodetic sensors: levelling instruments, tacheometers, GPS, laserscanning; geodetic coordinate calculations: traverses and trigonometric leveling; refraction; introduction to inertial surveying; software tools for data acquisition, data evaluation, preparation and visualisation of measurements
Lecture notesSlides of the regular lecture will be provided (in German), and further reading will be indicated as necessary.
LiteratureWitte B, Sparla P (2015) Vermessungskunde und Grundlagen der Statistik für das Bauwesen. 8. Aufl., Wichmann Verlag (in German)

Uren J, Price WF (2010) Surveying for Engineers. Palgrave Macmillan

A list of references for further reading will be provided.
103-0126-AALGeodetic Reference Systems
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Rothacher
AbstractFundamentals and theory of geodetic reference systems and frames. Introduction to current international systems as well as to systems for the Swiss national geodetic survey.
ObjectiveProvision of fundamental knowledge and theory to get familiar with the applications of geodetic reference systems. Special emphasis will be placed on international global systems as well as on the systems of the Swiss national geodetic survey.
ContentVarious coordinate systems and transformations;
reference systems and frames (inertial, Earth-fixed, topocentric) and associated transformations between the systems;
introduction to Earth rotation theory;
time systems;
Swiss national geodetic survey
Lecture notesWill be provided on ILIAS
LiteratureWill be provided on ILIAS
103-0132-AALGeodetic Metrology Fundamentals
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RA. Wieser
AbstractIntroduction to the most important sensors, operation and calculation methods of Geodetic Metrology
ObjectiveGetting to know the most important sensors, operation and calculation methods of Geodetic Metrology
ContentOverview on the different domains of geodetic metrology
Geodetic instruments and sensors
Determination of 3D-coordinates with GNSS, total sttaion and levelling
Calculation methods of geodetic metrology
Assessment of precision, introduction to variance propagation
Survey and staking-out methods
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture "Geodätische Messtechnik Grundzüge" (in German) will be provided.
LiteratureWitte B, Sparla P (2015) Vermessungskunde und Grundlagen der Statistik für das Bauwesen. 8. Aufl., Wichmann Verlag (in German)

Uren J, Price WF (2010) Surveying for Engineers. Palgrave Macmillan.
101-0414-AALTransport Planning (Transportation I)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe lecture course discusses the basic concepts, approaches and methods of transport planning in both their theoretical and practical contexts.
ObjectiveThe course introduces the basic theories and methods of transport planning.
ContentBasic theoretical links between transport, space and economic development; basic terminology; measurement and observation of travel behaviour; methods of the four stage approach; cost-benefit analysis.
LiteratureOrtuzar, J. de D. and L. Willumsen (2011) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.
103-0153-AALCartography II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RL. Hurni
AbstractTheory and mathematical basics of the cartographic visualisation of attributed geo-objects for static and interactive maps (with exercises).
ObjectiveThe course offers first computer graphics and mathematical basics and concepts of cartography. The accompanying exercises introduce further cartographic and GIS software, programming libraries for cartographic visualisation purposes. It is shown how web browsers, text editors and scripting languages can be used to develop efficient tools for cartographic data processing, design and visualisation.
ContentTopics like cartographic workflow, data capturing, data sources and legal aspects and Web map technologies:
- Introduction to QGIS, ArcGIS and OCAD
- Data sets, data types and data formats
- Analytical and visualisation processes in cartography
- Colour management and pre-press processes
- Web maps using HTML, CSS, JavaScript, SVG and Canvas 2D
- Interaction with diagrams and maps
- Libraries and APIs for cartographic applications
Lecture notesA specific programme for students with "additional requirements" will be provided. Please contact the supervisors.
LiteratureLinks to references and other materials will be provided by the supervisors.
103-0184-AALHigher Geodesy
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Rothacher
AbstractModern methods of Higher Geodesy. Basics of Shape of the Earth: Geoid determination and deflection of the vertical. Introduction into the most important topics: Satellite Geodesy and Navigation; Physical Geodesy and gravity field of the Earth; Astronomical Geodesy and Positioning; Mathematical Geodesy and basics of Geodynamics. Reference systems and applications in National and Global Geomatics.
ObjectiveOverview over the entire spectrum of Higher Geodesy
ContentActual methods of Higher Geodesy. Basics of Shape of the Earth: Geoid determination and deflection of the vertical. Introduction into the most important topics: Satellite Geodesy (GPS) and Navigation; Physical Geodesy and gravity field of the Earth; Astronomical Geodesy and Positioning; Mathematical Geodesy and basics of Geodynamics. Reference systems and applications in National and Global Geomatics.
Lecture notesRothacher, M.: Höhere Geodäsie (deutsch)
103-0214-AALCartography Fundamentals
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RL. Hurni
AbstractBasic knowledge about communication with spatial information by using plans and maps, about the most important design rules and production methods for map graphics.
ObjectiveAcquire basic knowhow about communication with spatial information by using plans and maps, about the most important design rules and production methods for map graphics. Ability to assess existing products with respect to their content-related and design quality. Ability to design proper plans and well designed legends for basic maps.
ContentDefinitions "map" and "cartography"
Map types
Current tasks and situation of cartography
Map history
Spatial reference systems
Map projections
Map concepts and workflow planning
Map design
Topographic maps
Analogous and digital map production technology
Prepress technology
Printing technology
Map critics
Lecture notesA specific programme for students with "additional requirements" will be provided. Please contact the supervisors.
LiteratureLinks to references and other materials will be provided by the supervisors.
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