Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Atmospheric and Climate Science Master Information
Electives
The students are free to choose individually from the entire course offer of ETH Zürich and the universities of Zürich and Bern.
Atmospheric Composition and Cycles
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4004-00LThe Global Carbon Cycle - ReducedW3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, M. Lupker
AbstractThe carbon cycle connects different reservoirs of C, including life on Earth, atmospheric CO2, and economically important geological reserves of C. Much of this C is in reduced (organic) form, and is composed of complex chemical structures that reflect diverse biological activity, processes and transformations.
ObjectiveA wealth of information is held within the complex organic molecules, both in the context of the contemporary carbon cycle and its links to is other biogeochemical cycles, as well as in relation to Earth's history, the evolution of life and climate on this planet.

In this course we will learn about the role of reduced forms of carbon in the global cycle, how these forms of carbon are produced, move around the planet, and become sequestered in the geological record, and how they can be used to infer biological activity and conditions on this planet in the geologic past. The course encompasses a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to global, and from the contemporary environment to earliest life.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course and the lecture course "651-4044-00L Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry" Link are good preparations for the combined Field-Lab Course ("651-4044-02 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course" and "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical"). Details under Link
701-1240-00LModelling Environmental PollutantsW3 credits2GM. Scheringer, C. Bogdal
AbstractModeling the emissions, transport, partitioning and transformation/degradation of chemical contaminants in air, water and soil.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for students who are interested in the environmental fate and transport of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals and exposure to pollutants in environmental media including air, water, soil and biota. The course focuses on the theory and application of mass-balance models of environmental pollutants. These models are quantitative tools for describing, understanding, and predicting the way pollutants interact with the environment. Important topics include thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions of chemical behavior in environmental systems; mechanisms of chemical degradation in air and other media; novel approaches to modeling chemical fate in a variety of environments, including lakes and rivers, generic regions, and at the global scale, and application of mass balance modeling principles to describe bioaccumulation of pollutants by fish and mammals.
ContentApplication of mass balance principles to chemicals in a system of coupled environmental media. Measurement and estimation of physico-chemical properties that determine the environmental behavior of chemicals. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the behavior of pollutants. Modeling environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and long-range transport potential of chemicals, including a review of available empirical data on various degradation processes. Current issues in multimedia contaminant fate modeling and a case study of the student's choice.
Lecture notesMaterial to support the lectures will be distributed during the course.
LiteratureThere is no required text. The following texts are useful for background reading and additional information.
D. Mackay. Multimedia Environmental Models: The Fugacity Approach, 2nd Ed. 2001. CRC Press.
R. P. Schwarzenbach, P. M. Gschwend, D. M. Imboden. Environmental Organic Chemistry. 2nd Ed. 2003, John Wiley & Sons.
M. Scheringer. Persistence and spatial range of environmental chemicals: New ethical and scientific concepts for risk assessment. 2002. Wiley-VCH.
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and ClimateW3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature and class presentations.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press. Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: Link
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

MacKenzie, F. T. (1999), Global biogeochemical cycles and the physical climate system, Global Change Instruction Program, UCAR, Boulder, CO, 69pp.

W. H. Schlesinger (1997), Biogeochemistry: An Analysis of Global Change, Academic Press.

Original literature.
701-1280-00LSelf-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science Restricted registration - show details
Please contact one of the professors listed under prerequisites/notice if you plan to take this course.

Students are allowed to enroll in both courses 701-1280-00L & 701-1281-00L Self-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science but have to choose different supervisors.
W3 credits6ASupervisors
AbstractThis course offers an individual pathway to deepen knowledge and understanding of a specific advanced topic in atmospheric and climate science in one of these fields:
- atmospheric chemistry
- atmospheric circulation and predictability
- atmospheric dynamics
- atmospheric physics
- climate modeling
- climate physics
- land-climate dynamics
ObjectiveThe learning goals of this course are threefold: 1) obtain novel insight into an advanced scientific topic, 2) train the self-study competences in particular related to reading of advanced textbooks and writing a concise summary, and 3) gain experience in the scientific interaction with experts. The format of the course is complementary to other types of teaching (lectures and seminars) and addresses skills that are essential for a wide range of professional activities (including a PhD).
ContentThe course has the following elements:
Week 1: Selection of specific topic and decision about reading material (textbook chapters and maybe 1-2 review papers)
Week 2: General discussion about self-study skills (how to read scientific literature and write summaries; specifics of scientific writing; how to prepare efficient meetings). For the scientific writing, students are encouraged to participate in an online training course offered by Stanford University:
Link
Weeks 6 and 9: Meetings with supervisor to clarify scientific questions
Week 12: Hand-in of written summary (4 pages maximum)
Week 14: Supervisor provides written feedback to the summary document
Week 16: Oral exam about the scientific topic
LiteratureLiterature (including book chapters, scientific publications) will be provided by the responsible supervisor in coordination with the student.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites depend on the chosen field and include successful completion of the listed lecture courses:
• atmospheric dynamics: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)
• atmospheric chemistry: “Stratospheric Chemistry” (701-1233-00L) or “Tropospheric Chemistry” (701-1234-00L) or “Aerosols I” (402-0572-00L).
• atmospheric physics: “Atmospheric Physics” (701-0475-00L)
• climate physics: “Klimasysteme” (701-0412-00L) or equivalent
• land-climate dynamics: “Land-climate dynamics” (701-1251-00L)
• climate modeling: “Numerical modeling of weather and climate” (701-1216-00L) (parallel attendance possible)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)

If you plan to take this course, please contact one of the professors according to your interest.
• atmospheric chemistry (Prof. T. Peter)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability (Prof. D. Domeisen)
• atmospheric dynamics (Prof. H. Wernli)
• atmospheric physics (Prof. U. Lohmann)
• climate modeling (Prof. C. Schär)
• climate physics (Prof. R. Knutti)
• land-climate dynamics (Prof. S. Seneviratne)
Climate History and Paleoclimatology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-3424-00LSedimentology and StratigraphieW4 credits3GA. Gilli
AbstractIntroduction of a range of concepts in sedimentology, Earth's surface processes and sedimentary geology in terms of processes and products. Familiarize students with a range of erosional, transportational and depositional processes and environments. The typical facies of the main depositional environments will be introduced.
ObjectiveStudents know about physical, chemical and biogenic sediments and sedimentary rocks. They are familiar with important physical, chemical and biological apects of sedimentation in continental settings and in the marine environment. The have the fundamentals needed for analysis and interpretation of sediments and sedimentary rocks in the field.
ContentTeil I Marine and lakustrische Sedimente:
-pelagische Sedimente
-hemipelagische Sedimente
-kieslige Sedimente
-Flachwasserkarbonate: Fazies, Diagenese
-lakustische Sedimente
-Evaporite

Teil II klastische Sedimente
- Sediment Transport, Strukturen und Schichtformen
- Terrestrische, flachmarine und tiefmarine Ablagerungsbereiche, Prozesse und Ablagerungsstrukturen
- Diagenese von Sandstein
- Tongesteine
Lecture notesSedimentologie-Skript
Prerequisites / NoticeVorlesung "Dynamische Erde" oder vergleichbare Einführungsvorlesung
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and ClimateW3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature and class presentations.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press. Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: Link
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

MacKenzie, F. T. (1999), Global biogeochemical cycles and the physical climate system, Global Change Instruction Program, UCAR, Boulder, CO, 69pp.

W. H. Schlesinger (1997), Biogeochemistry: An Analysis of Global Change, Academic Press.

Original literature.
701-1280-00LSelf-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science Restricted registration - show details
Please contact one of the professors listed under prerequisites/notice if you plan to take this course.

Students are allowed to enroll in both courses 701-1280-00L & 701-1281-00L Self-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science but have to choose different supervisors.
W3 credits6ASupervisors
AbstractThis course offers an individual pathway to deepen knowledge and understanding of a specific advanced topic in atmospheric and climate science in one of these fields:
- atmospheric chemistry
- atmospheric circulation and predictability
- atmospheric dynamics
- atmospheric physics
- climate modeling
- climate physics
- land-climate dynamics
ObjectiveThe learning goals of this course are threefold: 1) obtain novel insight into an advanced scientific topic, 2) train the self-study competences in particular related to reading of advanced textbooks and writing a concise summary, and 3) gain experience in the scientific interaction with experts. The format of the course is complementary to other types of teaching (lectures and seminars) and addresses skills that are essential for a wide range of professional activities (including a PhD).
ContentThe course has the following elements:
Week 1: Selection of specific topic and decision about reading material (textbook chapters and maybe 1-2 review papers)
Week 2: General discussion about self-study skills (how to read scientific literature and write summaries; specifics of scientific writing; how to prepare efficient meetings). For the scientific writing, students are encouraged to participate in an online training course offered by Stanford University:
Link
Weeks 6 and 9: Meetings with supervisor to clarify scientific questions
Week 12: Hand-in of written summary (4 pages maximum)
Week 14: Supervisor provides written feedback to the summary document
Week 16: Oral exam about the scientific topic
LiteratureLiterature (including book chapters, scientific publications) will be provided by the responsible supervisor in coordination with the student.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites depend on the chosen field and include successful completion of the listed lecture courses:
• atmospheric dynamics: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)
• atmospheric chemistry: “Stratospheric Chemistry” (701-1233-00L) or “Tropospheric Chemistry” (701-1234-00L) or “Aerosols I” (402-0572-00L).
• atmospheric physics: “Atmospheric Physics” (701-0475-00L)
• climate physics: “Klimasysteme” (701-0412-00L) or equivalent
• land-climate dynamics: “Land-climate dynamics” (701-1251-00L)
• climate modeling: “Numerical modeling of weather and climate” (701-1216-00L) (parallel attendance possible)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)

If you plan to take this course, please contact one of the professors according to your interest.
• atmospheric chemistry (Prof. T. Peter)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability (Prof. D. Domeisen)
• atmospheric dynamics (Prof. H. Wernli)
• atmospheric physics (Prof. U. Lohmann)
• climate modeling (Prof. C. Schär)
• climate physics (Prof. R. Knutti)
• land-climate dynamics (Prof. S. Seneviratne)
Hydrology and Water Cycle
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0468-00LWatershed Modelling Information W3 credits2GP. Molnar
AbstractIntroduction to watershed modelling with applications of GIS in hydrology, the use of semi- and fully-distributed continuous watershed models, and their calibration and validation. The course contains substantive practical modelling experience in several assignments.
ObjectiveWatershed Modelling is a course in the Master of Science in Environmental Engineering Programme. It is a practical course in which the students learn to (a) use GIS in hydrological applications, (b) calibrate and validate models, (c) apply and interpret semi- and fully- distributed continuous watershed models, and (d) discuss several modelling case studies. This course is a follow up of Hydrology 2 and requires solid computer skills.
Content- Introduction to watershed modelling
- GIS in watershed modelling (ArcGIS exercise)
- Calibration and validation of models
- Semi-distributed modelling with PRMS (model description, application)
- Distributed watershed modelling with TOPKAPI (model description, application)
- Modelling applications and case studies (climate change scenarios, land use change, basin erosion)
Literature- Lecture presentations
- Exercise documentation
- Relevant scientific papers
all posted on the course website
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and Climate Information W4 credits3GC. Schär, N. Ban
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to weather and climate models. It discusses how these models are built addressing both the dynamical core and the physical parameterizations, and it provides an overview of how these models are used in numerical weather prediction and climate research. As a tutorial, students conduct a term project and build a simple atmospheric model using the language PYTHON.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, students understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles, and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ContentThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction. Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteratureList of literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in atmospheric science, numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L) as well as experience in programming. Previous experience with PYTHON is useful but not required.
102-0448-00LGroundwater IIW6 credits4GM. Willmann, J. Jimenez-Martinez
AbstractThe course is based on the course 'Groundwater I' and is a prerequisite for a deeper understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems with a strong emphasis on numerical modeling.
ObjectiveThe course should enable students to understand advanced concepts of groundwater flow and transport and to apply groundwater flow and transport modelling.

the student should be able to
a) formulate practical flow and contaminant transport problems.

b) solve steady-state and transient flow and transport problems in 2 and 3 spatial dimensions using numerical codes based on the finite difference method and the finite element methods.

c) solve simple inverse flow problems for parameter estimation given measurements.

d) assess simple multiphase flow problems.

e) assess spatial variability of parameters and use of stochastic techniques in this task.

f) assess simple coupled reactive transport problems.
ContentIntroduction and basic flow and contaminant transport equation.

Numerical solution of the 3D flow equation using the finite difference method.

Numerical solution to the flow equation using the finite element equation

Numerical solution to the transport equation using the finite difference method.

Alternative methods for transport modeling like method of characteristics and the random walk method.

Two-phase flow and Unsaturated flow problems.

Spatial variability of parameters and its geostatistical representation -geostatistics and stochastic modelling.

Reactive transport modelling.
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- Anderson, M. and W. Woessner, Applied Groundwater Modeling, Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 448 p., 2002

- J. Bear and A. Cheng, Modeling Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport, Springer, 2010

- Appelo, C.A.J. and D. Postma, Geochemistry, Groundwater and Pollution, Second Edition, Taylor & Francis, 2005

- Rubin, Y., Applied Stochastic Hydrology, Oxford University Press, 2003

- Chiang und Kinzelbach, 3-D Groundwater Modeling with PMWIN. Springer, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticeEach afternoon will be divided into 2 h of lectures and 2h of exercises. Two thirds of the exercises of the course are organized as a computer workshop to get hands-on experience with groundwater modelling.
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementW3 credits2GP. Burlando
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
701-1280-00LSelf-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science Restricted registration - show details
Please contact one of the professors listed under prerequisites/notice if you plan to take this course.

Students are allowed to enroll in both courses 701-1280-00L & 701-1281-00L Self-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science but have to choose different supervisors.
W3 credits6ASupervisors
AbstractThis course offers an individual pathway to deepen knowledge and understanding of a specific advanced topic in atmospheric and climate science in one of these fields:
- atmospheric chemistry
- atmospheric circulation and predictability
- atmospheric dynamics
- atmospheric physics
- climate modeling
- climate physics
- land-climate dynamics
ObjectiveThe learning goals of this course are threefold: 1) obtain novel insight into an advanced scientific topic, 2) train the self-study competences in particular related to reading of advanced textbooks and writing a concise summary, and 3) gain experience in the scientific interaction with experts. The format of the course is complementary to other types of teaching (lectures and seminars) and addresses skills that are essential for a wide range of professional activities (including a PhD).
ContentThe course has the following elements:
Week 1: Selection of specific topic and decision about reading material (textbook chapters and maybe 1-2 review papers)
Week 2: General discussion about self-study skills (how to read scientific literature and write summaries; specifics of scientific writing; how to prepare efficient meetings). For the scientific writing, students are encouraged to participate in an online training course offered by Stanford University:
Link
Weeks 6 and 9: Meetings with supervisor to clarify scientific questions
Week 12: Hand-in of written summary (4 pages maximum)
Week 14: Supervisor provides written feedback to the summary document
Week 16: Oral exam about the scientific topic
LiteratureLiterature (including book chapters, scientific publications) will be provided by the responsible supervisor in coordination with the student.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites depend on the chosen field and include successful completion of the listed lecture courses:
• atmospheric dynamics: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)
• atmospheric chemistry: “Stratospheric Chemistry” (701-1233-00L) or “Tropospheric Chemistry” (701-1234-00L) or “Aerosols I” (402-0572-00L).
• atmospheric physics: “Atmospheric Physics” (701-0475-00L)
• climate physics: “Klimasysteme” (701-0412-00L) or equivalent
• land-climate dynamics: “Land-climate dynamics” (701-1251-00L)
• climate modeling: “Numerical modeling of weather and climate” (701-1216-00L) (parallel attendance possible)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)

If you plan to take this course, please contact one of the professors according to your interest.
• atmospheric chemistry (Prof. T. Peter)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability (Prof. D. Domeisen)
• atmospheric dynamics (Prof. H. Wernli)
• atmospheric physics (Prof. U. Lohmann)
• climate modeling (Prof. C. Schär)
• climate physics (Prof. R. Knutti)
• land-climate dynamics (Prof. S. Seneviratne)
Prerequisites
The definition of prerequisites is part of the admission procedure for the master studies. You are informed by the admission office as to what courses of the section «prerequisites» you have to catch up with. You are accredited for these courses in the electives block of the master studies.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0412-00LClimate SystemsW3 credits2GR. Knutti, I. Medhaug
AbstractThis course introduces the most important physical components of the climate system and their interactions. The mechanisms of anthropogenic climate change are analysed against the background of climate history and variability. Those completing the course will be in a position to identify and explain simple problems in the area of climate systems.
ObjectiveStudents are able
- to describe the most important physical components of the global climate system and sketch their interactions
- to explain the mechanisms of anthropogenic climate change
- to identify and explain simple problems in the area of climate systems
Lecture notesCopies of the slides are provided in electronic form.
LiteratureA comprehensive list of references is provided in the class. Two books are
particularly recommended:
- Hartmann, D., 2016: Global Physical Climatology. Academic Press, London, 485 pp.
- Peixoto, J.P. and A.H. Oort, 1992: Physics of Climate. American Institute of Physics, New York, 520 pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeTeaching: Reto Knutti, several keynotes to special topics by other professors
Course taught in german, slides in english
Additional Electives ETH
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Minors
Minor in Physical Glaciology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-1504-00LSnowcover: Physics and ModellingW4 credits3GM. Schneebeli, H. Löwe
AbstractSnow is a fascinating high-temperature material and relevant for applications in glaciology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, polar climatology, remote sensing and natural hazards. This course introduces key concepts and underlying physical principles of snow, ranging from individual crystals to polar ice sheets.
ObjectiveThe course aims at a cross-disciplinary overview about the phenomenology of relevant processes in the snow cover, traditional and advanced experimental methods for snow measurements and theoretical foundations with key equations required for snow modeling. Tutorials and short presentations will also consider the bigger picture of snow physics with respect to climatology, hydrology and earth science.
ContentThe lectures will treat snow formation, crystal growth, snow microstructure, metamorphism, ice physics, snow mechanics, heat and mass transport in the snowcover, surface energy balance, snow models, wind transport, snow chemistry, electromagnetic properties, experimental techniques.

The tutorials include a demonstration/exercise part and a presentation part. The demonstration/exercise part consolidates key subjects of the lecture by means of small data sets, mathematical toy models, order of magnitude estimates, image analysis and visualization, small simulation examples, etc. The presentation part comprises short presentations (about 15 min) based on selected papers in the subject.

First practical experience with modern methods measuring snow properties can be acquired in a field excursion.
Lecture notesLecture notes and selected publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeWe offer a field excursion to Davos on Saturday, March 23, 2019, in Davos. We will demonstrate traditional and modern field-techniques (snow profile, Near-infrared photography, SnowMicroPen) and you will have the chance to use the instruments yourself. The excursion includes a visit of the SLF cold laboratories with the micro-tomography setup and the snowmaker.
101-0288-00LSnow and Avalanches: Processes and Risk ManagementW3 credits2GJ. Schweizer, S. L. Margreth
AbstractThe lecture covers snow and avalanche processes in a catchment (starting zone, path and run-out zone) with a particular focus on risk management in the context of natural hazards.
Objective- basics of snow and avalanche mechanics
- methods to model snow and avalanche processes
- interaction of snow and avalanches with structures and forest
- methods of stability evaluation and hazard assessment
- avalanche protection measures in the context of integral risk management
- basics on the design and effectiveness of protection measures
ContentIntroduction, snow precipitation, extreme events, snow loads; snow and snow cover properties; snow-atmosphere interaction; avalanche formation; stability evaluation, avalanche forecasting; avalanche dynamics; avalanche impact on structures; hazard mapping; protection measures (permanent and temporal); integral risk management.
LiteratureArmstrong, R.L. and Brun, E. (Editors), 2008. Snow and Climate - Physical processes, surface energy exchange and modeling. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., 222 pp.

BUWAL/SLF, 1984. Richtlinien zur Berücksichtigung der Lawinengefahr bei raumwirksamen Tätigkeiten. EDMZ, Bern.

Egli, T., 2005. Wegleitung Objektschutz gegen gravitative Naturgefahren, Vereinigung Kantonaler Feuerversicherungen (Hrsg.), Bern.

Fierz, C., Armstrong, R.L., Durand , Y., Etchevers, P., Greene, E., McClung, D.M., Nishimura, K., Satyawali, P.K. and Sokratov, S.A., 2009. The International Classification for Seasonal Snow on the Ground. HP-VII Technical Documents in Hydrology, 83. UNESCO-IHP, Paris, France, 90 pp.

Furukawa, Y. and Wettlaufer, J.S., 2007. Snow and ice crystals. Physics Today, 60(12): 70-71.

Margreth, S., 2007. Technische Richtlinie für den Lawinenverbau im Anbruchgebiet. Bundesamt für Umwelt, Bern, WSL Eidg. Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung Davos. 134 S.

McClung. D.M. and Schaerer, P. 2006. The Avalanche Handbook, 3rd ed., The Mountaineers, Seattle.

Mears, A.I., 1992. Snow-avalanche hazard analysis for land-use planning and engineering. 49, Colorado Geological Survey.

Schweizer, J., Bartelt, P. and van Herwijnen, A., 2015. Snow avalanches. In: W. Haeberli and C. Whiteman (Editors), Snow and Ice-Related Hazards, Risks and Disasters. Hazards and Disaster Series. Elsevier, pp. 395-436.

Schweizer, J., Jamieson, J.B. and Schneebeli, M., 2003. Snow avalanche formation. Reviews of Geophysics, 41(4): 1016, doi:10.1029/2002RG000123.

Shapiro, L.H., Johnson, J.B., Sturm, M. and Blaisdell, G.L., 1997. Snow mechanics - Review of the state of knowledge and applications. Report 97-3, US Army CRREL, Hanover, NH, U.S.A.
Prerequisites / NoticeFull-day excursion (not mandatory) to Davos, hands-on experience on selected topcis, visit at WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF (early March 2019)
651-4090-00LQuantification and Modeling of the Cryosphere: Spatial and Thermal Processes (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: GEO413

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
Link
W6 credits2PUniversity lecturers
Abstract
Objective
ContentDer Kurs ist sehr praktisch ausgelegt und es arbeiten in der Regel zwei Teilnehmer als Team an einem Computer. Für jede Lektion gibt es eine Informationsseite in Internet. Auf diesen Seiten sind die jeweils nötigen Information (Anleitungen, Datenzugang etc.) zugänglich. Zusätzlich sind für jede Stunde drei weitere Dinge
aufgelistet: 1) Voraussetzungen, 2) Vorbereitung und 3) Prüfungsrelevanter Stoff. Unter „Voraussetzungen“ sind Begriffe und Konzepte genannt, deren Verständnis für die Stunde wichtig sind und die als (von anderen Veranstaltungen) bekannt vorausgesetzt werden.
Unter „Vorbereitung“ sind z.B. Publikationen angegeben, die vor der Stunde gelesen werden sollen und Teil des Unterrichts sind. Unter „Prüfungsrelevanter Stoff“ finden Sie eine Liste der Techniken, Methoden und Konzepte, die Sie für die Prüfung beherrschen müssen.
Lecture notesDie Unterlagen sind auf dem Web verfügbar. Der Zugang wird in der Vorlesung bekannt gegeben.
651-4162-00LField Course Glaciology Information
Priority is given to D-ERDW students. If space is available UZH Geography and Earth System Sciences students may attend this field course at full cost.

No registration through myStudies. The registration for excursions and field courses goes through Link only.
W3 credits6PA. Bauder, D. Farinotti, M. Werder
AbstractIntroduction to investigation methods in glaciology with both theory and experimental application. The students design, plan, sample, evaluate and present the results of own individual projects.
Objective- Introduction to measurement techniques in glaciology
- Experience with realisation of measurement and data analysis
- Interpretation and presentation of results
ContentThe course covers methodologies and techniques to analyse physical conditions of glaciers and their evolution. Basic measurement techniques of surveying,drilling as well as working with sensors and data loggers are introduced. Covered fields include topographical setting, mass balance, glacier fluctuations, ice flow and glacier hydrology.
The course starts with an introduction toward the end of the spring semester and is followd by 7 days in september including lectures at ETH and a field work on Rhonegletscher.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome basic knowledge in glaciology e.g. course 651-3561-00L Kryosphäre is recommended.
This field course is organized in collaboration with the University of Hokkaido in Sapporo.

Students registering for the course confirm having read and accepted the terms and conditions for excursions and field courses of D-ERDW Link
Minor in Biogeochemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and ClimateW3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature and class presentations.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press. Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: Link
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

MacKenzie, F. T. (1999), Global biogeochemical cycles and the physical climate system, Global Change Instruction Program, UCAR, Boulder, CO, 69pp.

W. H. Schlesinger (1997), Biogeochemistry: An Analysis of Global Change, Academic Press.

Original literature.
Minor in Global Change and Sustainability
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
860-0012-00LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.
STP students have priority.

This is a research seminar at the Master level. PhD students are also welcome.
W3 credits2S + 2AB. Wehrli, R. Athavale, T. Bernauer
AbstractThis seminar focuses on the technical, economic, and political challenges of dealing with water allocation and pollution problems in large international river systems. It examines ways and means through which such challenges are addressed, and when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ObjectiveAbility to (1) understand the causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in large international river systems; (2) understand ways and means of addressing such water challenges; and (3) analyse when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ContentBased on lectures and discussion of scientific papers and reports, students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation. Students will then, in small teams coached by the instructors, carry out research on a case of their choice (i.e. an international river basin where riparian countries are trying to find solutions to water allocation and/or water quality problems associated with a large dam project). They will write a brief paper and present their findings towards the end of the semester.
Lecture notesSlides and reading materials will be distributed electronically.
LiteratureThe UN World Water Development Reports provide a broad overview of the topic: Link
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is open to Master and PhD students from any area of ETH.

ISTP students who take this course should also register for the course 860-0012-01L - Cooperation and conflict over international water resources; In-depth case study.
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