Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Environmental Sciences Master Information
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for Master students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0071-AALMathematics III: Systems Analysis
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RR. Knutti, H. Wernli
AbstractThe objective of the systems analysis course is to deepen and illustrate the mathematical concepts on the basis of a series of very concrete examples. Topics covered include: linear box models with one or several variables, non-linear box models with one or several variables, time-discrete models, and continuous models in time and space.
ObjectiveLearning and applying of concepts (models) and quantitative methods to address concrete problems of environmental relevance. Understanding and applying the systems-analytic approach, i.e., Recognizing the core of the problem - simplification - quantitative approach - prediction.
ContentIntroduction to principles of models; one-dimensional linear box models; multi-dimensional linear box models; nonlinear box models; models in space and time
Lecture notesTeaching material: book (see literature).
LiteratureImboden, D.S. and S. Pfenninger (2013) Introduction to Systems Analysis: Mathematically Modeling Natural Systems. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

Link
701-0106-AALMathematics V: Applied Deepening of Mathematics I - III
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. A. Sprenger
AbstractSelected mathematical topics are presented for later use in more specialised lectures. Part of the topics were already discussed in the lectures Mathematics I-III. Here, they should be shortly recapitulated and most importantly applied to practical problems. If necessary, new mathematical concepts and methods will be introduced in order to solve challenging and inspiring problems from practice.
ObjectiveThe aim of this lecture is to prepare the students for the more specialised lectures. They should become more familiar with the mathematical background, the mathematical concepts und most of all with their application and interpretation.
ContentPractical examples from the following areas will be discussed: ordinary differential equations; eigenvalue problems from linear algebra; systems of linear and nonlinear differential equations; partial differential equations (diffusion, transport, waves).
701-0243-AALBiology III: Essentials of Ecology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RJ. Hille Ris Lambers
AbstractThis course assigns reading for students needing further background for understanding ecological processes. Central problems in ecology, including population growth and regulation, the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
ObjectiveOriginal language Students will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.
ContentReadings from a text book will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, invasion, and the maintenance of species diversity. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
701-0401-AALHydrosphere
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RR. Kipfer, M. H. Schroth
AbstractThe course aims to describe the relevant processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ObjectiveQualitative and quantitative understanding on how physical (and geochemical) processes control the natural dynamics in groundwater, lakes ans oceans and constrain the exchange of mass and energy.
ContentTopics of the course.
Physical properties of water (i.e. density and equation of state)
- global water resources
Exchange at boundaries
- energy (thermal & kinetic), gas exchange
Mixing and transport processes in open waters
- vertical stratification, large scale transport
- turbulence and mixing
- mixing and exchange processes in rivers
Groundwater and its dynamics
- ground water as part of the terrestrial water cycle
- ground water hydraulics, Darcy's law
- aquifers and their properties
- hydrochemistry and tracer
- ground water use
Case studies
- 1. Water as resource, 2. Water and climate
Lecture notesIn addition to the self-learning literature handouts are distributed.
LiteratureTextbooks for self-studying.
Surface water.
'Physics and Chemistry in Lakes', ed: Lerman, A., Imboden, D.M., and Gat, J., Springer Verlag, 1995:
Chapter 4: Imboden, D.M., and Wüest, A. 'Mixing Mechanisms in Lakes'
'Environmental Organic Chemistry', ed: Schwarzenbach, R., Imboden, D. M., and Gschwend, Ph., Willey, 2002:
Chapter 6.4: Air-Water Partitioning
Chapter 19.2: Bottleneck Boundaries

Ground water:
Fetter, C.W. 'Applied Hydrogeology', Prentice Hall, 2002 (4th edition):
Chapters 1 - 6, 8, 10, 11.

Optional additional readers.
Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.


a) Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
b) Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.
701-0473-AALWeather Systems Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. A. Sprenger, F. Scholder-Aemisegger
AbstractThe students learn about the dynamical features of the Earth's atmosphere. They interpret satellite imagery and learn about basic concepts in dynamical meteorology. The global circulation is briefly discussed, before introducing the Eulerian and the Lagrangian perspective, which are used to study air streams in extratropical cyclones and to investigate basic aspects in mountain meteorology.
ObjectiveThe students are able to
- explain basic measurement and analysis techniques that are relevant in atmospheric dynamics
- to discuss the mathematical basics of atmospheric dynamics, based on selected atmospheric flow phenomena
- to explain the basic dynamics of the global circulation and of synoptic- and meso-scale flow features
- to explain how mountains influence the atmospheric flow on different scales
- basic understanding of the role of moist adiabatic processes for weather systems and why stable water isotopes are useful in this context
ContentSatellite observations; analysis of vertical soundings; geostrophic and thermal wind; cyclones at mid-latitude; global circulation; north-atlantic oscillation; atmospheric blocking situtations; Eulerian and Lagrangian perspective; potential vorticity; Alpine dynamics (storms, orographic wind); planetary boundary layer
Lecture notesLecture notes and slides
LiteratureAtmospheric Science, An Introductory Survey
John M. Wallace and Peter V. Hobbs, Academic Press
701-0475-AALAtmospheric Physics
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RU. Lohmann
AbstractThis course covers the basics of atmospheric physics, which consist of: cloud and precipitation formation, thermodynamics, aerosol physics, radiation as well as the impact of aerosols and clouds on climate and artificial weather modification.
ObjectiveStudents are able
- to explain the mechanisms of cloud and precipitation formation using knowledge of humidity processes and thermodynamics.
- to evaluate the significance of clouds and aerosol particles for climate and artificial weather modification.
ContentMoist processes/thermodynamics; aerosol physics; cloud formation; precipitation processes, storms; importance of aerosols and clouds for climate and weather modification, clouds and precipitation
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides and script will be made available
LiteratureLohmann, U., Lüönd, F. and Mahrt, F., An Introduction to Clouds:
From the Microscale to Climate, Cambridge Univ. Press, 391 pp., 2016.
701-0501-AALPedosphere
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RR. Kretzschmar
AbstractIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of soils as integral parts of ecosystems, development and distribution of soils as a function of environmental factors, and processes leading to soil degradation.
ContentDefinition of the pedosphere, soil functions, rocks as parent materials, minerals and weathering, soil organisms, soil organic matter, physical soil properties and functions, chemical soil properties and functions, soil formation, principles of soil classification, global soil regions, soil fertility, land use and soil degradation.
Literature- Scheffer/Schachtschabel - Soil Science, Springer, Heidelberg, 2016.

- Brady N.C. and Weil, R.R. The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th ed. Prentice Hall, 2007.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge in chemistry, biology and geology.
701-0721-AALPsychology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Siegrist
AbstractThis is an introductory course in psychology. This course will emphasize cognitive psychology and the psychological experiment.
ObjectiveKnowledge of key concepts and exemplary theories of psychology and their relation to "daily" psychology. Comprehension of relation between theory and experiment in psychology.

Goals: Learning how psychologists are thinking, a side change from the ETH natural science perspective to psychological thinking.

Domains of psychology:
- Psychology fields
- Concept definitions of psychology
- Theories of psychology
- Methods of psychology
- Results of psychology

Capability:
Be able to define a psychological research question
Basics understanding of role of psychology

Comprehension:
Psychology as a science of experience and behavior of the human
ContentEinführung in die psychologische Forschung und Modellbildung unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der kognitiven Psychologie und des psychologischen Experiments. Themen sind u.a.: Wahrnehmung; Lernen und Entwicklung; Denken und Problemlösen; Kognitive Sozialpsychologie; Risiko und Entscheidung.
LiteratureEnglish book of Zimbardo (Link)

Scholz, R. W. (2011). Environmental Literacy in Science and Society: From Knowledge to Decisions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Prerequisites / NoticeDetermine with Prof. Dr. Michael Siegrist the chapters in "Zimbardo" which are compulsory reading

Read the two Psychology chapters (6 + 7) from the book of Prof. Roland W. Scholz
752-4001-AALMicrobiology Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RM. Ackermann
AbstractSelf-study course in microbiology.
ObjectiveTeaching of basic knowledge in microbiology.
ContentThis is a self-study course for students with microbiology as an admission requirement. The goal of the course is that students acquire basics in microbiology, including bacterial cell biology, genetics, growth and physiology, metabolism, phylogeny and microbial diversity, and applications of microbiology.
LiteratureThis self-study course is based on the book 'Brock, Biology of Microorganisms'.
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