Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Environmental Sciences Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2011)
Specialization in an Environmental System
Environmental Biology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0326-00LEcological and Evolutionary ApplicationsW3 credits2VJ. Jokela
AbstractApplication of ecological theory is relevant especially for habitat and ecosystem restoration, for management of endangered species, and for pest control and harvest management. Ecological applications are central for sustainable ecosystem management and expertise in this field is needed in various professions. Purpose of this course is to give an overview of the common applications and methods.
ObjectiveGoals of this course are
(i) to give an overview of different methods and applications of ecological and evolutionary theory
(ii) to illustrate how fundamental and applied research interact in ecology and evolution
(iii) to give more detailed view on methods used in restoration ecology and management of populations, with practical examples.
The course uses a textbook, which provides the script and the background reading materials, lectures extend and explain the concepts introduced in the textbook.
Literaturetextbook: "Ecological Applications: toward a sustainable world" by Colin R. Townsend. Blackwell publishing.
701-0330-00LEvolutionary Epidemiology of Infectious DiseasesW3 credits2VJ. Koella
AbstractThe evolutionary epidemiology of infectious diseases merges the ideas of evolutionary ecology and epidemiology to understand better the transmission and control of parasites and infectious diseases. The course introduces the theoretical and empirical basis of its key topics. While using malaria as an example to link these topics, it will also discuss other parasites of humans, animals and plants.
Objective- Students obtain an overview of key topics of evolutionary epidemiology
- Students understand simple epidemiological and evolutionary models
- Students recognise how the epidemiology of parasites is influenced by evolutionary processes
- Students can use evolutionary ideas to understand the success (or lack of it) of methods of control against infectious diseases
Content1. Übersicht von Parasiten mit Bedeutung für unsere Gesundheit oder die Erhaltung der Biodiversität
2. Manipulation des Verhaltens durch Parasiten
3. Evolution der Virulenz
4. Evolution der Resistenz gegen Parasiteninfektion, und Koevolution von Parasiten und Wirten
5. Grundlagen der theoretischen Epidemiologie
6. Evolution und die Kontrolle von Infektionskrankeiten
7. Parasiten in Ökosystemen
8. Evolutive Entstehung von Infektionskrankeiten
701-0340-00LPractical Course in Environmental BiologyO7 credits14PC. Vorburger, M. Fischer, S. Güsewell, J. Jokela
AbstractThis course aims at developing research skills in environmental biology. Students carry out small research projects in plant ecology, ecological genetics, aquatic ecology and population biology. These projects include field surveys as well as garden and laboratory experiments. Students analyse their data statistically and present the results both orally and in written reports.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to carry out ecological research projects. They obtain a thorough understanding of selected research topics, and they gain practical experience in handling a wide range of organisms in various types of ecosystems.
After the course, successful participants can:
- formulate precise research questions and testable hypotheses
- design and set up experiments
- measure appropriate variables (for the studied organisms and hypotheses)
- analyse data statistically and draw conclusions from statistical outputs
- present their results according to scientific standards in the research field
ContentThe semester starts with an introduction to research questions and hypotheses, experimental design and data analysis.

During the semester, students carry out several small research projects in aquatic ecology, plant ecology and ecological genetics. Projects address specific research questions related to general topics such as:
- resource acquisition
- competition, grazing, predation, parasitism
- population structure (demography, spatial patterns)
- community composition, species diversity
- species differentiation and hybridisation

During the field course (one full week after the semester), students carry out their individual project in population biology. They choose the topic, organism and system they want to study and develop their own research questions. They conduct the entire research project by themselves and present their results orally and in a report.
Prerequisites / NoticeCompulsory attendance. Absences have to be compensated.
Semester tasks: Oral and/or written presentations after different parts of the course.
Human-Environment Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0650-00LRisk Analysis and ManagementW3 credits2GA. Patt, D. N. Bresch, J. Jörin
AbstractThis course introduced students to principles of quantitative risk analysis, across a wide variety of environmental areas including weather and climate, natural hazards, and toxic substances. It also introduces them to established practices of risk management, including regulatory approaches, insurance, and contingency planning.
Objective- Competence in applying methods of quantitative risk analysis.
- Understanding of common approaches towards risk management.
- Understanding of the importance of risk and uncertainty in decision- and policy-making.
- Ability to communicate risk information clearly and effectively.
ContentStatistics for risk analysis; Monte Carlo simulation; toxicology and epidemiology; exposure assessment; fault tree analysis; risk in decision-making; risk perception and communication; loss spreading and insurance; mitigating natural hazard losses; risk and climate change policy.
Prerequisites / Noticenone
701-0658-00LSeminar for Bachelor Students: Anthroposphere
This course takes place in autumn semester beginning autumn semester 2018.
W2 credits2SA. Müller, D. N. Bresch, A. Patt, M. Siegrist
AbstractAnalysis and presentation of scientific articles in the domain of Human Environment Systems with focus on the relevant methods and theories. Skills in literature research concerning a given topic in the ISI Web of Knowledge.
ObjectiveThe sudents have to read current scientific articles on research issues in the field of Human-Environment-Relations and to learn to understand them, to present them in a summarized form, to document the most important points (including methods), to search for publications in the web of knowledge (ISI) and to give a constructive critical assessment of them.
ContentDas Forschungsfeld Mensch-Umwelt Beziehung ist gekennzeichnet durch eine grosse Themen- und Methodenvielfalt. Dies kommt unter anderem in den wissenschaftlichen Beiträgen der an der Veranstaltung beteiligten Professuren zum Ausdruck. Die Studierenden wählen aus einem breiten Angebot eine wissenschaftliche Publikation aus und referieren darüber im Seminar (s.o. link). Erwartet wird insbesondere das Herausarbeiten der Fragestellung, die Beschreibung der gewählten Methode, die wichtigsten Erkenntnisse des Beitrages sowie offene Fragen bzw. zukünftige Forschungsfragen. Zusätzlich zum verarbeiteten Artikel sollen zwei weitere Publikation aus dem ISI Web of Knowledge zum gleichen Thema recherchiert und zum präsentierten Artikel in Bezug gesetzt werden. Durch Teilnahme an der Diskussion der präsentierten Artikel wird zudem das Stellen und Beantworten von Fragen zur Präsentation geübt.
Lecture noteskeines
LiteratureEs wird eine Liste von Publikationen aus den an der Veranstaltung beiteiligten Professuren abgegeben.
701-0660-00LPractical Course Anthroposphere Restricted registration - show details W7 credits14PO. van Vliet, P. Krütli, J. Lilliestam
AbstractThe subject of this course is the analysis of interactions within human-environment systems.The students will learn to develop energy scenarios, guided by different natural and social constraints and aims in a simple optimisation model. We then appraise the relative merits of the different scenarios using multi-criteria analysis.
ObjectiveIn the practical course Anthroposphere students learn how to analyze the interactions in human-environment-systems with scientific tools. Methods from the natural sciences and social sciences are applied and linked with each other.
ContentMulti-criteria analysis (MCA) is a widely used methodology for providing guidance to decision-makers on problems touching many different aspects of people's lives, where it is impossible or undesirable to reduce all outcomes associated with a particular choice to monetary values. In the MCA problem that forms the heart of this course is the question of climate change. Students will gain practice at writing computer simulation models, ultimately developing a simplified model of the energy system, in order to identify and quantify the tradeoffs between different energy solutions. Using this model it will be possible to identify a number of different effects on society associated with alternative energy system scenarios. Using data on preferences and values collected via surveys, it will be possible to rank the relative attractiveness of the alternatives.
Lecture notesHandouts will be presented during the course.
LiteratureReferences will be given during the course.
701-0791-01LEnvironmental History Restricted registration - show details W1 credit1SD. Speich Chassé
AbstractThe Seminar is connected to Course 701-0791-00 "Environmental History". Selected topics will be treated in the form of short essays.
ObjectiveIntroduction into environmental history; survey of long-term development of human-nature-interrelations; discussion of selected problems. Improved ability to assess current problems from a historical perspective and to critically interrogate one's own standpoint.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzung ist der Besuch der Vorlesung 701-0791-00 "Umweltgeschichte" im HS 2016
Forest and Landscape
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0554-00LControl and Development of Rural Land-Use SystemsW3 credits2GH. R. Heinimann
AbstractThe learning unit develops an understanding how sectors of the earth surface develop in the long run. Forestry yield regulatory systems are treated in depth because they emerged at the beginning of the sustainability debate. The learning unit introduces the Swiss spatial development and planning system, and the foresrty planning system and mechanisms.
ObjectiveDie erfolgreiche Absolvierung der Lerneinheit befähigt Studierende:
- Raumentwicklung als ein öffentliches, kooperatives Entscheidungs- und Handlungssystem zu verstehen und zu erklären, bei dem Planung den Teil des systematischen, nachvollziehbaren Entscheidens vorbereitet,
- Die Wechselwirkung zwischen verschiedenen Landnutzungsmodellen und Systemen und der gesellschaftlich erwarteten Bereitstellung von Oekosystemgütern und -leistungen sowie deren geschichtliche Entwicklung zu verstehen bzw. zu gestalten,
- Raumnutzungs-spezifische Planungssysteme verstehen, erklären und beurteilen,
- Planungsprozesse als systematische Verfahren kooperativer Koordination und Problemlösung verstehen und unterstützen,
- Probleme und Herausforderungen der heutigen Raumentwicklungssysteme zu identifizieren und Optionen für ihre gezielte Veränderung erkennen.
Content1. Systeme der Raumentwicklung
- Raum als System menschlichen Entscheidens und Handelns (Williamson`s 4-Schalenmodell),
- Institutionen (Spielregeln) der Raumentwicklung (Schale 3),
- Governance als Zuweisung von Verfügungsrechten (Schale 2),
- Problem der optimalen Ressourcenallokation (Schale 1).

2. Störungsmuster als treibende Kräfte der Landschaftsgestaltung
- Natur- und Umweltgefahren
- Risiko-Management-Philosophie
- Schnittstellen zur Landnutzung

3. Landnutzungsmodelle und -systeme
- Mittelalterliches Dorf: Wurzeln der kooperativen, genossenschaftlichen Landnutzung
- Wissenschaftlich-rationale Gestaltung der Nutzung (v. Thünen, Faustmann, neuere Entwicklungen NIPF, Adaptive Ecosystem Management)
- Waldnutzungssysteme
- Räumliche und zeitliche Ordnung als Voraussetzung zielorientierten Gestaltens und Lenkens der Landnutzung
- Geschichtlicher Abriss der Entstehung von Waldnutzungssystemen
- Fibre Farming und Plantagen-Wirtschaft
- Systeme mit statischer räumlich-zeitlicher Ordnung
- Systeme mit adaptiver räumlich-zeitlicher Ordnung (z.B. Schweiz Walbausysteme)
- Dauerwaldsysteme
- Ökosystemmanagement-Ansätze: Beispiel der Koordination räumlicher Störungsmuster auf Einzugsgebietsebene und des Schlag-Layouts auf Betriebsebene

4. Planungshierarchien und -systeme
- Entscheidungsprobleme der Landnutzung
- Instrumente der Raumplanung
- Schnittstellen mit sachgebietsbezogenen Planungen,
- Entwicklungsplanung, mittel- bis langfristige Definition bereitzustellender Ökosystemgüter und Dienstleistungen,
- Betriebsplan
- Strategieentwicklung auf betrieblicher Ebene unter öffentlichen Nebenbedingungen.
- Holzernte- und Ausführungsplanung als Problem des optimalen Ressourceneinsatzes

5. Planungsprozesse
- Weltbilder und Planungsansätze,
- Rationaler Problemlösungs-Zyklus als Phasenmodell systematischen Entscheidungsvorbereitens,
- Methoden zur Erfassung und Beschreibung des Systemzustands und der Systementwicklung,
- Entscheidungsunterstützung mit Modellen und Tools,
- Verfahren und Systeme der öffentlichen Mitwirkung,

6. Herausforderungen an die Raumentwicklung der Zukunft
- Umlagerung von Nutzungsaktivitäten als Hauptherausforderung
- Mögliche Mechanismen
Lecture notesStudents will get lecture notes
LiteratureGerman
701-0560-00LPractical "Forests and Landscapes" Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
Priority is given to students withthe specialisation Forest and Landscape.

The lecture "701-0303-00 Waldvegetation und Waldstandorte" is an important background for the excursions "Standortkunde". Participation is strongely recommended.
W7 credits14PH. Bugmann, H.‑U. Frey, F. Kienast, M. Lévesque, P. Rotach, T. N. Sieber, S. Zimmermann
AbstractIn this practical, students get to know important field and laboratory methods of forest and landscape research as well as landscape management. They apply these methods in the context of small projects. The practical consists of three parts: Ecology (both forest and landscape), Site Classification (soil science & phytosociology), and Land Management.
ObjectiveStudents
- know the most important methods of field research in selected branches of forest and
landscape science
- can apply these methods independently on the context of a project
- are in the position to interpret data from field sampling correctly, and can use them to
answer applied research questions
Prerequisites / NoticeFor this practical, it is recommended that students have some knowledge in the following subjects (besides the core courses of the specialization "Wald und Landschaft"):

- Geographic Information Systems (elective course, 5th semester)
- Site classification (elective course "Site classification and plant communities", 6th semester)
- Knowledge of forest soils (elective course "Ökologie von Waldböden", 6th semester)
- Dendrology and Woody Plants of Central Europe (elective courses)
- Systematic botany (e.g. biodiversity excursions, plant part, 2th semester)
701-0582-00LConcepts of Forest ManagementW3 credits2GM. Lévesque
AbstractConcepts of forest managment
ObjectiveForests and landscape are influenced by the numerous needs of society. Current conditions are largely the result of historical and modern forms of forest management. For a good understanding of these systems and for the development of future, adaptive management concepts, basic knowledge of the former and current concepts of forest management is essential.

Objectives of the course:

Students get an overview over historical and modern froms of forest mangagment. They know the important products and services of forests and landscapes. They are capable to validate the different forms of management, especially regarding their economic efficiencies, their influence on ecosystem functions, - processes and -structures, habitat quality, biodiversity and negative ecological effects
Content- Historic concepts of forest management, experiences and "lessons learned"
- Goods and services of forests (former and today) basic concepts of forest managament (irregular, regular systems, histroic forms, multifunctional concepts) - Advantages and disadvantages of the various concepts (economy, ecology, forest and landscape goods and services, environment, habitat quality, biodiversity) - forest and land use in tropical and subtropical areas - combined forms (agroforestry)
Lecture notesno handout
power point slides are available for download
Literaturenone
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of German and English language required
Bachelor's Thesis
Students can choose between one Bachelor thesis of 10KP or two Bachelor theses of 5KP each
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0010-02LShort Bachelor's Thesis in Social Sciences and Humanities Restricted registration - show details W5 credits11DLecturers
AbstractBy developing the bachelor's thesis, students learn to (a) analyse a problem using scientific methods and concepts, (b) write a report according to scientific standards and (c) correctly cite scientific literature. Depending on the chosen orientation of the thesis, the students learn these skills through an empirical analysis, a literature review, via design tasks or through an an applied project.
ObjectiveBy developing the bachelor's thesis, students learn to (a) analyse a problem using scientific methods and concepts, (b) write a report according to scientific standards and (c) correctly cite scientific literature.
ContentA bachelor's thesis in the domain "Social sciences and humanities" usually deals with an issue at the interface of those sciences, the environment and sustainability. Methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation stemming from the social sciences are applied.
A short bachelor's thesis should consist of a text, with graphs and figures, of 15-20 pages.
701-0010-03LShort Bachelor's Thesis in Natural Sciences and Engineering Restricted registration - show details W5 credits11DLecturers
AbstractBy developing the bachelor's thesis, students learn to (a) analyse a problem using scientific methods and concepts, (b) write a report according to scientific standards and (c) correctly cite scientific literature. Depending on the chosen orientation of the thesis, the students learn these skills through an empirical analysis, a literature review, via design tasks or through an an applied project.
ObjectiveBy developing the bachelor's thesis, students learn to (a) analyse a problem using scientific methods and concepts, (b) write a report according to scientific standards and (c) correctly cite scientific literature.
ContentA bachelor's thesis in "Natural sciences" deals with a topic at the interface of natural sciences, the environment and sustainability. The methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation appropriate to the natural sciences are used.
A thesis in "Engineering" deals with the environmental effects of use and application. The thesis may take the form of an analysis or review of a current technology, or the design of a future technological application. In an inter- or transdisciplinary thesis, knowledge from various fields and disciplines would be merged on the basis of an overarching question, or developed via the input of key societal actors.
A short bachelor's thesis should consist of a text, with graphs and figures, of 15-20 pages.
701-0010-10LBachelor's Thesis Restricted registration - show details W10 credits21DLecturers
AbstractBy developing the bachelor's thesis, students learn to (a) analyse a problem using scientific methods and concepts, (b) write a report according to scientific standards and (c) correctly cite scientific literature. Depending on the chosen orientation of the thesis, the students learn these skills through an empirical analysis, a literature review, via design tasks or through an an applied project.
ObjectiveBy developing the bachelor's thesis, students learn to (a) analyse a problem using scientific methods and concepts, (b) write a report according to scientific standards and (c) correctly cite scientific literature.
ContentThe BA is written either under the "Social sciences and humanities" or the "Natural sciences and technology" modules. The thesis may also be inter- and transdisciplinary.
A bachelor's thesis in the domain "Social sciences and humanities" usually deals with an issue at the interface of those sciences, the environment and sustainability. Methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation stemming from the social sciences are applied. A bachelor's thesis in "Natural sciences" deals with a topic at the interface of natural sciences, the environment and sustainability. The methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation appropriate to the natural sciences are used. A thesis in "Technology" deals with the environmental effects of use and application. The thesis may take the form of an analysis or review of a current technology, or the design of a future technological application. In an inter- or transdisciplinary thesis, knowledge from various fields and disciplines would be merged on the basis of an overarching question, or developed via the input of key societal actors.
A bachelor's thesis should consist of a text, with graphs and figures, of 30-40 pages.
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