Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Landscape Architecture Master Information
Compulsory Basic Courses
Compulsory basic courses are offered in the autumn semester only.
Core Courses
The core courses build on the basic courses and convey basic, broad knowledge in the core areas of landscape architecture in relation to design lessons. Some of the core courses are compulsory and some are freely selectable. Further details, in particular about taking these subjects, for performance assessments and for compensating for failed subjects, are regulated in Art. 27 and Art. 31 Paragraph 4.
Compulsory Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
061-0106-00LDesigning with Plants II Information Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2GS. Hassold
AbstractThe knowledge of plant species is at the core of most designs in landscape architecture. This course will introduce basic knowledge about the following topics: biotopes of Switzerland (phytosociology, plant societies, habitat conditions), expanding plant knowledge of native herbs.
ObjectiveThe students will be able to recognize and determine around fifty native herbs and implement them in their designs. They will understand the greater biogeographic connections in Switzerland and know the most important biotopes with their characteristics. They will further expand their knowledge about botanical terms and vocabulary which allow them to use botanical literature for their designs.
ContentExpansion of the plant knowledge of native species is at the core of this course. The course builds up on module 5 “Designing with plants I”. Theoretical and conceptual lectures are supporting the students to expand their knowledge. They will broaden their botanical knowledge which will allow them to professionally integrate plants in their designs. The concepts will be illustrated and discussed with realized examples to tie the theoretical basics with practical cases.

The course is structured into three topics:
1) The understanding of biogeographic connections in relation to climate, soil, altitude, exposure, etc. is essential to implement a design in architecture landscapes successfully.
2) We use the most important biotopes of Switzerland to explain plant societies and phytosociology. This knowledge is essential to find the most appropriate planting in the designs.
3) The knowledge plants will be expanded to ca. sixty native herbs using fresh plant material during the lecture. A one day excursion will be organized to observe the plant species in their natural habitat. The students will learn how to use a plant identification key in order to be able to identify plants on their own. Thereby they will also expand their knowledge about botanical terms.
Lecture notesNotes will be provided on the student server.
LiteratureThe relevant literature and content for the examination will be indicated during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere is one full day excursion for the plant knowledge. The amount on lectures on Thursday is therefore reduced. The date will be discussed at the beginning of the semester.

It is also highly recommended to visit the
lecture series D-ARCH, LV-063-0502-00 (no credits).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
061-0108-00LMaterials and Construction II Information Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2GR. Voss
AbstractThe course discusses current constructive problems in landscape architecture as part of the complex and multi-faceted urban space that is cultivated and animated by humans.
ObjectiveThe students learn comprehensive skills in dealing with constructive questions.The goal is to promote a value-based critical and research-based thinking that is the prerequisite for discovering new questions and developing independent solutions.
ContentIn the spring semester, the course Materials and Construction II deals with constructive questions on the topics of “Operating With Time”, “Measures and References”, “Use of Vegetation in the House and the City” (tree in the city, the green house). The lecture uses concrete examples to illustrate how thinking about constructive possibilities and conditions determine and permeate the design process. The lectures are accompanied by on-site inspections. The relevant data will be communicated at the beginning of the semester. The weekly schedule is published on the degree program's website (or is included in the reader).
Lecture notesThe reader will be distributed in the first lecture of the semester.
LiteratureThe reader contains all relevant literature (also relevant for the exam).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is aimed exclusively at the students of the master's programme in landscape architecture.

It is also highly recommended to visit the
lecture series D-ARCH, LV-063-0502-00 (no credits).
061-0114-00LDigital Design Methods II Information Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2GD. Häusler, B. Kowalewski
AbstractThis course continues to introduce digital design methods in landscape architecture from data acquisition and modelling, to simulation, and visualization and consolidates already learned techniques.
ObjectiveEssential large-scale design tools are introduced and expand the students' knowledge of digital design methods. By the end of the semester the students have mastered the introduced survey methods, landscape modelling tools as well as simulation and visualization techniques. They are able to use those methods independently in the following semesters and in practice.
ContentBased on a case study, the students work on the entire workflow of a landscape architectural project:
From data collection in the field to 2D and 3D modelling in the Landscape Visualization and Modelling Lab (LVML), analysis and simulation with various software solutions to visualizations and physical prototypes, this course covers the most important digital methods in landscape architecture.
The course is divided into three parts:

1. Survey
2. Modelling
3. Analysis, Simulation, Visualization

The case study will serve as a synthesis project where the students can apply their acquired skills. During the course, students are supported by an interdisciplinary team in the development of their case study. The case study will be conducted individually.
Lecture notesDigital and physical learning material is provided throughout the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is also highly recommended to visit the
lecture series D-ARCH, LV-063-0502-00 (no credits).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
061-0112-00LLaw as a Design Factor Information Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2GP. Bonzanigo, O.  Streiff Gnöpff
AbstractState structure, legal system and negotiation processes related hereto shape the dynamics in the production of space and the image of landscapes, infrastructures and settlements. Spatially relevant legal provisions can provide impulses as design factors when planning spaces and territories at different scales and with different degrees of urbanization.
ObjectiveStudents understand key principles and spatially relevant aspects of the legal system and gain insight into formal and informal planning and participation processes. They are able to
situate public and private law regulations at different planning scales and to consider them from a multiscale perspective as limitations and possible guidelines for landscape design.
ContentAfter introducing law as a system and the structure of the multilevel state, the most important classifications and the central principles of law are introduced.
In further steps, knowledge on different levels of planning from supra-local to local to object-related scales (structure plans, land use plans, urban development and building regulations) is imparted. The focus here is on design-relevant and spatially effective content (areas, lines, volumes and density specifications). Further focal points are the cultural heritage and the temporal transformation (sites, inventories and objects of protection) as well as environmental law, financial and operational aspects, in particular formal and informal planning and participation processes.
The contents and the resulting interpretations and design perspectives are deepened and critically reflected in the context of a field trip.
In the graded semester performance spatially relevant aspects on a specific project site are analyzed and used to develop a landscape project.
Prerequisites / NoticeAdditional information at the beginning of the semester on
Link

Course start: 03.03.2023
25.04.2023 Interim review with Studio Voser
06.05.2023 Field trip 9.00-17.00 NEW DATE

(Details via moodle)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
061-0104-00LUrban Systems Information Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2VT. Galí-Izard
AbstractA combination of lectures and practical exercises will provide the tools to understand the landscape systems that structure and support the urban condition. Lectures will present global examples of urban systems related to soils, trees and forests, care, water evacuation, water supply, rivers and open waters.
ObjectiveStudents will learn how the territory, climate and geology create potentials and constraints for the development of cities around the world. By looking closely at the condition of the city, students will produce knowledge about the state of urban landscape systems. Lastly, students will understand how this methodology informs the design process.

The course emphasizes the importance of collaboration between landscape architects and other disciplines as a necessity to address the complex issues that face our cities today. By providing examples of successful and unsuccessful collaborations, the course models how students can be effective collaborators in practice.
ContentThe course is organized around core landscape systems: soil and geology, vegetation and water.

These lectures provide a coherent series of examples of urban systems throughout the world organized around key landscape themes. This framework provides a methodology for analyzing contemporary projects in relation to landscape systems and the urban condition. Students will develop this methodology through exercises that will be reviewed throughout the course.
Lecture notesCourse material will be provided.
LiteratureThe course material includes a reading list.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
061-0120-00LDigital Design Methods III Information Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2GT. Galí-Izard, P. Urech
AbstractThis course builds on the introduction of digital design methods in landscape architecture, and encompasses data acquisition and modelling to simulation and visualization. The final semester of this series focuses on consolidating the techniques previously learned.
ObjectiveEssential large-scale design tools that were introduced in the previous semesters will be applied to individual design tasks. By the end of the semester the students have mastered the introduced survey methods, landscape modelling tools as well as simulation and visualization techniques. They are able to use those methods independently in the following semesters and in practice.
ContentBased on an individual case study, the students work on the entire workflow of a landscape architectural project. From data collection to 2D and 3D modelling in the Landscape Visualization and Modelling Lab (LVML), analysis and simulation with various software solutions to visualizations and physical prototypes, this course covers the most important digital methods in landscape architecture. The course is divided into three parts: 1. Survey, Analysis 2. Modelling 3. Simulation, Visualization The case study will serve as a synthesis project where the students can apply their acquired skills. During the course, students are supported by an interdisciplinary team in the development of their case study. The case study will be conducted individually.
Lecture notesDigital and physical learning material is provided throughout the course.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
Elective Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
061-0110-00LHistory and Theory of Landscape Architecture II Information Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2VA. Bucher
AbstractLandscape as a multiperspective phenomenon combines different scientific disciplines, epistemological viewpoints and different practices. Which dimensions are currently relevant for their understanding and design? The course discusses currently relevant theories and comprehensions of landscape in their respective contexts of thought as well as on the basis of case studies and exemplary projects.
ObjectiveThe course provides an overview of currently relevant understandings and theories of landscape. Students learn about different theoretical perspectives and case studies and how to relate them to their own work. The goal is to develop a sustainable basis for thinking and acting for a context-sensitive design practice that is embedded in larger contexts/problem situations.
ContentLandscape as a multi-perspective subject has problematized the dichotomy of nature and culture/art/technology as well as existing disciplinary determinations. Landscape means many things at the same time and is basically in a state of change.
The course discusses different assumptions and viewpoints that has shaped the understanding of landscape (and nature), as well as its planning and design, in recent decades. It starts from landscape as an expanded field in which not only specifically scientific, but also overarching aesthetic, ecological, global, indigenous, decolonial, feminist, participatory, hybrid and other conceptions of landscape and nature have become established. Along these different theoretical conceptions and landscape discourses and in view of significant case studies and landscape practices, an understanding of nature and landscape adapted to the problem situation shall be discussed.
LiteratureA definitive reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course
Prerequisites / Notice1st priority: MScLA
2nd priority: MScARCH
Student limit: 18

It is also highly recommended to visit the
lecture series D-ARCH, LV-063-0502-00 (no credits).
061-0116-00LNew Civic Landscapes and Public Health Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2Vnot available
AbstractPublic space is widely seen as a determining factor in people’s health and well-being, particularly in densifying urban environments. How can we define a healthy city, and how do landscape architects contribute to it?
ObjectiveThrough the study of historical references, and the analysis of contemporary urban spaces and regulatory frameworks, this course will develop awareness, knowledge and practical tools to integrate health and well-being factors into the urban design.
ContentWhile the majority of people living in large cities say they would rather live elsewhere, health and well-being are becoming key criteria in residence and carrier choices. Not only the urban environment is globally perceived as polluted and stressful, its spatial framework is often experienced as unfit to provide the ingredients of a healthy ilife, for individuals and societies, such as physical activity, social interaction, and regular contact with natural elements.
This course aims to enrich our vision of health in the city, with concepts and tools useful for designing civic spaces at all scales – neighbourhood, city, and larger metropolis.
Lecture notesCourse material will be provided.
LiteratureThe course material includes a reading list.
Prerequisites / Notice1st priority: MScLA
2nd priority: MScARCH
Student limit: 18

Students will work in teams of 2 and present their results and progress each time in a seminar format.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
701-0791-00LEnvironmental History - Introduction and Overview Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2VM. Gisler
AbstractIntroduction into environmental history as a discipline that ask for the human-nature-relationships from a long-term and spatially defined perspective. By presenting a selection of different topics the lecture provides access to new questions and insights.
ObjectiveIntroduction into environmental history; survey of long-term development of human-nature-interrelations; discussion of selected problems. Improved ability to assess current problems from a historical perspective and to critically interrogate one's own standpoint.
ContentHumans live in and with nature, depend on it, change it permanently: as bio- and geological agents they intervene, reshape, leave prints, improve, reproduce and demonize nature; in short, they’re “doing environment”. Namely in the 20th century, the "era of ecology" (Joachim Radkau) or the age of the “Great Acceleration” (John McNeill), human interventions in their environments have increased exponentially. But nature itself is also constantly changing, adapting, striking back. This leads to a constantly changing interrelation between human and nature.
This interdependence is at the core of this lecture. The introduction into “environmental history” offers an overview of the human-environment-relationship in a long-term perspective. It outlines concepts such as the anthropocene, climate and energy as well as questions of environmental policy and the history of the environmental movements. It is meant to expand the competencies for the assessment of current problems and the critical questioning of one's own point of view.
Lecture notesCourse material is provided in digital form.
Literature- Kupper, P. (2021). Umweltgeschichte, Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht.
- Radkau, J. (2011). Die Ära der Ökologie, München: Beck.
- McNeill, J.R. (2000). Something new under the sun: An environmental history of the twentieth-century world, New York: Norton.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are asked to write an exam during the last session
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
103-0330-00LLandscape Aesthetics Information W2 credits2GR. Rodewald
AbstractLandscape aesthetics - Theory and practice of the sensuous cognition of landscape qualities.The lecture comprises short excursions as well as theoretical and practical applications of landscape quality and their development goals.
ObjectiveBecoming familiar with the concepts of landscape aesthetics and obtaining an overview of the im-portance, methods and applicability of aesthetical landscape valuation and development.
ContentAesthetic qualities of landscapes are difficult to measure. However, they play a big role in evaluating landscape change. In recent years there has been a growing interest in theoretical and practical sen-sory methods that enable the assessment and understanding of landscape perception. Practical analyses of landscapes and their development requires knowledge of the concepts of "beauty" and "aesthetic cognition and evaluation".
Lecture notesRodewald, R., Hangartner M., Bögli, N., Sudau, M., Switalski, M., Grêt-Regamey, A. 2020:
Landscape Aesthetics: Theory and Practice of the Sensuous Cognition of Landscape Qualities – Lecture Script
LiteratureBourassa, S.C. 1991. The aesthetics of landscape, London
Nohl. W. 2015. Landschaftsästhetik heute. Auf dem Wege zu einer Landschaftsästhetik des guten Lebens. Ausgewählte Aufsätze aus vier Jahrzehnten, München
Rodewald, R., Gantenbein, K. 2016. Arkadien. Landschaften poetisch gestalten, Zürich
Rodewald R, Liechti K. 2016. From Campagna to Arcadia: Changes in the reception of terraced landscapes in art and their practical implications. Annales Series Historia et Sociologia 26(3): 363-374.
Wöbse, H. H. 2002. Landschaftsästhetik, Stuttgart
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture of Bourassa The aesthetics of landscape, 1991, will be expected.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
052-0570-23LLecture Series Design and Architecture: One Building - Failure is an Option 4 Information W2 credits1VP. Heiz
AbstractThe lecture series of the Institute of Design and Architecture - in the FS23 provides students with an overview of the various positions of the teachers within the IEA (Institute Design in Architecture).
ObjectiveThe lecture series of the Institute of Design and Architecture - in the FS23 provides students with an overview of the various positions of the teachers within the IEA (Institute Design in Architecture).

.
Prerequisites / NoticeTUE FEB 21st
18:00 - 20:00 Mariam Kamara

TUE MAR 14th
18:00 - 20:00 Chie Konno introduced by Momoyo Kaijima

TUE APR 18th
18:00 - 20:00 Anna Puigjaner

WED MAY 10th
18:00 - 20:00 Anne Holtrop

TUE MAY 16th
18:00 - 20:00 Francesca Gagliardi and Federico Rossi
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesfostered
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
052-0718-23LTerritory of the City: Venice Information Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2GG. Vogt
AbstractThe elective deals with current transformation processes of metropolitan landscapes in Europe and introduces landscape architecture design on a territorial scale.
On the basis of cartographic analysis and field trips, students will develop concrete strategies for the Venetian Lagoon, which stretches over 500km2 around the city.
ObjectiveThe elective introduces to the subject and complexity of the urbanized landscape and teaches the critical engagement with the challenges and potentials of current tendencies in Landscape Architecture. On the basis of a concrete study area, students examine the large-scale processes of reuse, reform and reinterpretation of metropolitan landscapes in Europe and develop new approaches and strategies on various scales. They become familiar with GIS as an analytical tool, model building as a design methodology and the representation of landscape through plans. They develop a project based on the perception of place, knowledge of landscape-architectonic typologies and conception of public space. The design process is accompanied by workshops, lectures, excursions, critiques and a workbook.
ContentDie Art und das Ausmass der Nutzung von Landschaft haben sich in den letzten Jahrzehnten grundlegend verändert. Einerseits wird die Ressource Landschaft heutzutage viel intensiver genutzt, wie dies die starke Zunahme von Rohstoffabbau und Materialtransporten sowie der massive Ausbau von Infrastrukturen verdeutlichen. Gleichzeitig wird die Nutzung in gewissen Gebieten auch extensiviert, wodurch Verbrachungs- und schliesslich Verwilderungsprozesse eintreten. Zudem sind Landschaften zunehmend rasanten und teilweise global wirkenden Veränderungen in Mobilität, Klima, Landwirtschaft, Energie und Freizeitverhalten unterworfen. In der Summe führt dies zu einer tiefgreifenden Transformation von Landschaften, wobei der Wandel uneinheitlich, ungleich und teilweise diametral erfolgt. Die historische Koexistenz und räumliche Trennung von bis anhin in die Landschaft eingelagerten Nutzungen (z.B. Landwirtschaft, Verkehr, Militär, Tourismus oder Energieproduktion) löst sich zunehmend auf. An ihre Stelle tritt eine operationalisierte Landschaft, in die im metropolitanen Kontext oftmals auch informellen Erholungs- und Sportnutzungen eingeschrieben sind. Die neuen Formen von «Parks», die dadurch entstehen, sind nicht mehr klar fass- und einordnungsbar, sondern breiten sich temporär und räumlich diffus auf das urbane Territorium aus. Die treibenden Kräfte hinter dieser Entwicklung sind einerseits im Ausbau der Infrastrukturnetzwerke des öffentlichen Verkehrs, insbesondere der S-Bahn, und andererseits in der oftmals chronischen Übernutzung innerstädtischer Freiräume zu verorten. Die Erholungssuchenden weiten als Folge ihren Aktionsradius auf die schnell erreichbaren und unmittelbar verfügbaren Freizeitlandschaften aus. Dieser Prozess erfolgt oftmals informell und ungeplant; die Menschen nehmen sich den Raum für ihre Aktivitäten, wo und wie sie es für nötig halten. Die Überlagerung und Verflechtung von teilweise konträren Interessen, die sich oftmals ausschliessen, führt zu Reibungen und Konflikten, die durchwegs positiv und produktiv sein können: Landschaft wird nicht mehr länger nur als ökonomische-, sondern vermehrt auch als öffentliche Ressource begriffen, was eine zukünftige Debatte über die Art und Weise der (Be-)Nutzung der Landschaft und die Möglichkeit einer integralen, demokratischen Entwicklung der Landschaft als öffentlicher Raum notwendig macht.
Lecture notesA workbook with texts and background information is available for purchase (CHF 20.-). A digital version is also available for free.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe participation in the course is subject to the following three conditions:
1) The course is limited to 12 students. The restriction follows the time of the inscription according to the first-come-first-served-principle.
2) A field-trip to the respective metropolis is mandatory for all students.
3) The contribution to expenses will be max. 250.- CHF per student.
063-0704-23LCartographies of Living Systems: A Critical ApproachW2 credits2GT. Galí-Izard
AbstractThis course will be an introduction to essential aspects of designing with living systems. The lectures will cover a curated list of constructed landscapes that embody a high level of complexity in their composition, systems, and evolution.
ObjectiveIn class and through additional drawing exercises, the students will explore the components of the sites in great detail: their plant communities, infrastructure, management regimes, climatic and geologic contexts, and the larger systems and territories in which they are embedded. Students will be introduced to meaningful landscape projects, and will learn a methodology for understanding the field of landscape architecture and its potential in relationship to the dynamic performance of living things.
ContentIn the lectures, the students will learn about a selection of significant built landscapes that span a range of sizes, ages, and places of origin. The projects will be taught through an analytical framework that prioritizes key landscape elements that are often overlooked in traditional representations of projects. The students will contribute to the course by translating this complexity through a drawing exercise. Altogether, the work of the studio will be a critical and comparative study of significant landscape architecture projects, past and present.
Lecture notesCourse material will be provided.
LiteratureThe course material includes a reading list.
052-0716-23LTopology Information Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2KP. Urech, M. Vollmer
AbstractThe elective course "Topology" in the Spring Semester of 2023 builds on a long standing specialization in the spatial exploration of the landscape. We will embark the participants on a terrain that we shape through our own thoughts and actions, adopting different perceptual perspectives, supported by examples from art, literature, technology and history.
ObjectiveThis elective course gives architecture students the opportunity to further develop their perception of space through a site-specific approach in the field of landscape architecture. The students will learn to use 3D point cloud technology and other spatial sensing technologies in order to analyze complex urban landscape and develop new ways of editing and representing these intertwined spaces.
ContentStudents will document and analyze the given site to reveal its topological potentials and sensory qualities. This understanding will be gained through point cloud modeling and audiovisual composition. In particular, we will develop a new, comprehensive sectional model of a topologically interesting site situation.

Students will become acquainted to working with point cloud models produced with laser-scanning. Through a series of steps, they will learn how a laser-scanning survey is conducted, how the raw data is processed, how point cloud models are assembled, what qualities these models can provide to analyze, explore and represent space as an audiovisual experience.

Collected samples from the field will be assembled and built into an interactive application in the «Landscape Virtualization and Modeling Lab». All software required is open source and can also be installed on private laptops, facilitating work from home if necessary.
LiteratureLiterature will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / Notice- The course is limited to 20 students (based on available computer stations)
- Students will work in groups of 2
- The lectures will be held in English, assistance in English and German
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
052-0714-23LSerendipity: Uetliberg Section Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.
W2 credits2GD. Häusler, P. Urech, M. Vollmer
AbstractThe course Serendipity: Uetliberg Section will combine two research approaches at the D-Arch and teaches current methods for recording, analysing and documenting the existing urban environment in 3D models and processing it into CAD drawings.
ObjectiveStudents will reflect on the perception of the urban environment and the methods used to map and model the existing context – discussing, how different methodologies shape the way we perceive our environment. Therefore 3D tools such as laser scanning and photogrammetry will be tested in the field. Their application in the urban context and the workflow from scan to drawing will become known to the students.
Content«The layout of the city of Zurich is well known. Not only is it continuously surveyed by official bodies in maps or plans, it has also served architects and historians time and again in the past as a basis for examining the development of the city. But what does the city look like in section? And what insights can be derived from it?»

This is the question that the teaching and research project Schnitt durch Zürich (Section through Zurich) has been investigating by the Chair of Laurent Stalder. As an Addition to the existing work, this course will create a section of the Uetliberg. In the course of methodical refinement 3D laser scanning and point cloud modeling methods, developed at the Chair of Chirstophe Girot are used to digitally model the topography and vegetation as well as pathways and buildings. Following the data collection the materials will be transferred to common CAD Software and reproduced in a section. Students will use scanners to scan the slopes and forests of the Uetliberg in fieldwork and get introduced to the workflow from scan to CAD drawing. This should give a tool for a better understanding of the existing context in future projects and thus broaden the students' methodological scope
Lecture notes- Learning Materials and Software Tutorials will be provided during the classes.
- Students will generally work in groups of 2
LiteratureLiterature will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lectures will be held in English, assistance in English and German
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingfostered
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
Advanced Courses
The specialized courses are freely selectable and offer students the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge in certain areas of landscape architecture.
The details for the performance assessments are regulated in Art. 27.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
061-0118-00LLandscape Acoustics Information Restricted registration - show details W3 credits3GN. M. Schütz
AbstractLandscape Acoustics describes an integrated design practice linking acoustic qualities to spatial concepts and material elements of landscape architecture. Introduction to the physical, theoretical, social and ecological foundations of landscape acoustics. Application examples and practical introductions to the current techniques and methods of soundscape analysis and environmental sound design.
ObjectiveThis course covers basic theoretical and technical notions of sound as related to outdoor environments combining physical, perceptual, social and ecological knowledge. The course aims to raise awareness of acoustics as a multifaceted landscape perception and design constituent.
ContentLandscape Acoustics describes an integrated design practice linking acoustic qualities to spatial concepts and material elements of landscape architecture. It attaches equal importance to the production, propagation and perception of sound, considering a meaningful auditory relationship between people and their environment.

This course covers basic theoretical and technical notions of sound as related to outdoor environments. It introduces a holistic sonic landscape understanding combining physical, perceptual, social and ecological approaches. Through case studies from different epochs and cultures, the course aims to raise awareness of acoustics as a multifaceted landscape perception and design constituent. Practice workshops and applied exercises – with introductions to field recording and the use of the AudioVisual Lab – invite students to explore different tools and methods for environmental sound analysis and design and become actors on acoustic landscape quality.

The course includes weekly theory and design inputs and a two-day hands-on workshop. Short listening and soundwalking exercises in the beginning of the semester encourage students to dive into sonic landscape experience and adopt the theoretical course contents in an intuitive way. These observations are then processed into a site-specific semester thesis with written, graphic and sound content. The final oral presentations take place on the day of the last course date.

A handout with detailed information will be presented during the first course meeting.
Lecture notesHandouts and a reading list will be provided.

During the semester, students will have access to audio recording equipment and to the AudioVisual Lab workstations.
LiteratureThe course material includes a reading list.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course includes weekly theory and design inputs and a two-day hands-on workshop.

Course structure - overview:

24.02.2022, 12h00-13h30: Introduction

03.03.2022, 12h00-13h30: Theory Input

10.03.2022,12h00-13h30 : Theory Input

11.-12.03.2022: Practice workshop: field recording & lab work

17.03.2022, 12h00-13h30 : Design Input

31.03.2022,12h00-13h30: Design Input

05.05.2022, 12h00-13h30: Feedback and support for semester work finalization

12.05.2022 : Final presentations

The number of participants is limited to 18 students (due to the limited number of sound recording devices and the number of workstations in the AudioVisual Lab).

Depending on the number of participants, students will work in groups of two or three.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
103-0517-00LUrban and Spatial Economics
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2Vto be announced
AbstractThis course explores the economic factors which influence location decisions of households and firms, and it explores theories of how these decisions induce the formation of cities. The course will cover the neoclassical models of land use, concepts from the new economic geography, zoning, and transportation and traffic congestion.
ObjectiveThe objective of the course is to provide graduate students with an understanding of the economic factors which give rise to urban spatial structure and the models which have been employed to study these processes. The course aims to help students develop an appreciation for the use of economic models in both positive and normative frameworks. We will assess both the history of thought regarding the role of markets in creating urban development, and we will read about modern theories of externalities and economic factors which induce agglomeration. The final section of the course will focus on transportation problems in urban areas and the use of economic models to assess public policy measures to deal with congestion and associated externalities.
ContentOutline of Lectures

Topic 1: Why do cities exist?
Topic 2: The Basic Muth-Mills model
Topic 3: The New Economic Geography
Topic 4: Business demand for land and Von Thünen's model)
Topic 5: Urban spatial structure
Topic 6: Land use control
Topic 7: City size and city growth
Topic 8: Traffic externalities and congestion
Topic 9: Public transport
Topic 10: The housing crisis
LiteratureTextbook

o Urban Economics by Arthur O'Sullivan, McGraw-Hill.

Ancillary Texts

o Lectures on Urban Economics, K. Brückner, 2011, The MIT Press

o Cities, agglomeration and spatial equilibrium by E. L. Glaeser, 2008, Oxford University Press.

o A Companion to Urban Economics, Richard Arnott and Daniel McMillen (eds.), Blackwell, 2006.

o The new introduction to geographical economics, Steven Brakman, Harry Garretsen and Charles van Marrewijk, Cambridge.

o Urban transport economics, by K. A. Small and E. Verhoef, Routledge.
103-0448-01LTransformation of Urban Landscapes
Only for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
W3 credits2GJ. Van Wezemael, A. Gonzalez Martinez
AbstractThe lecture course addresses the transformation of urban landscapes towards sustainable inward development. The course reconnects two complexity approaches in «spatial planning» and «urban sciences» as a basic framework to look at a number of spatial systems considering economic, political, and cultural factors. Focus lies on participation and interaction of students in groups.
Objective- Understand cities as complex adaptive systems
- Understand planning in a complex context and planning competitions as decision-making
- Seeing cities through big data
- Understand (urban) governance as self-organization
- Learn basic practical approaches such as Design-Thinking methods for solving problems of inward development
ContentStarting point and red thread of the lecture course is the transformation of urban landscapes as we can see for example across the Swiss Mittelland - but in fact also globally. The lecture course presents a theoretical foundation to see cities as complex systems. On this basis it addresses practical questions as well as the complex interplay of economic, political and spatial systems.

While cities and their planning were always complex, the new era of globalization exposed and brought to the fore this complexity. The reason behind this is the networking of hitherto rather isolated places and systems across scales on the basis of information and communication technologies (ICTs). «Parts» of the world still look pretty much the same but we have networked them and made them strongly interdependent. This networking fuels processes of self-organization. In this view, regions emerge from a multitude of relational networks of varying geographical reach and they display intrinsic timescales at which problems develop. In such a context, an increasing number of planning problems remain unaffected by either «command-and-control» approaches or instruments of spatial development that are one-sidedly infrastructure- or land-use orientated. In fact, they urge for novel, more open and more bottom-up assembling modes of governance and a «smart» focus on how space is actually used. Thus, in order to be effective, spatial planning and governance must be reconceptualised based on a complexity understanding of cities and regions, considering self-organizing and participatory approaches and the increasingly available wealth of data.
LiteratureA reader with original papers will be provided via the Moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
101-0588-01LRe-/Source the Built EnvironmentW3 credits2SG. Habert
AbstractThe course focuses on material choice and energy strategies to limit the environmental impact of construction sector. During the course, specific topics will be presented (construction technologies, environmental policies, social consequences of material use, etc.). The course aims to present sustainable options to tackle the global challenge we are facing and show that "it is not too late".
ObjectiveAfter the lecture series, the students are aware of the main challenges for the production and use of building materials.

They know the different technologies/propositions available, and environmental consequence of a choice.

They understand in which conditions/context one resource/technology will be more appropriate than another
ContentA general presentation of the global context allows to identify the objectives that as engineer, material scientist or architect needs to achieve to create a sustainable built environment.

The course is then conducted as a serie of guest lectures focusing on one specific aspect to tackle this global challenge and show that "it is not too late".

The lecture series is divided as follows:
- General presentation
- Notion of resource depletion, resilience, criticality, decoupling, etc.
- Guest lectures covering different resources and proposing different option to build or maintain a sustainable built environment.
Lecture notesFor each lecture slides will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture series will be conducted in English and is aimed at students of master's programs, particularly the departments ARCH, BAUG, ITET, MAVT, MTEC and USYS.

No lecture will be given during Seminar week.
101-0259-00LRiver Restoration Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2.5GV. Weitbrecht, M. Mende, K. Sperger, S. Vollenweider Carù, C. Weber, C. Wyss
AbstractBased on enhanced understanding of river morphodynamics and the ecosystem of riverscapes, the course introduces different river engineering techniques. It copes with the different expectations (space for agriculture, water for energy production, flood protection...) towards riverscapes in modern society.
The students work on a project study with the goal of revitalizing a given river section.
ObjectiveDuring this course, the students learn how to
- describe the most important relations in river morphodynamics and their impact on the ecosystem of riverscapes
- elaborate solutions within river restoration, dealing with the different societal expectations towards riverscapes.
- deal with personal, social and technical obstacles in the planning of a river restoration project.
ContentRiver restoration aims to reestablish near natural processes in
riverscapes to increase habitat quality and biodiversity. Based on enhanced understanding of river morphodynamics, the course introduces different engineering techniques with focus on sediment transport processes and flood protection. In addition, the course aims to cope with the different expectations (space for agriculture, water for energy production, flood protection, nature protection...) towards riverscapes in modern society.

During the semester, the students work on a project study with the goal of revitalizing a river section with a certain focus topic. It follows a student-centered apporach, with field trips, a role play and interactive coaching sessions together with river restoration experts from engineering practice.
Lecture notesNo lecture notes
LiteratureLiterature recommendations are given during the semester
Prerequisites / NoticeHighly recommended as a technical preparation: River Engineering (Course 101-0258-00L, Autumn Semester)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
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