Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Chemistry Master Information
Core Subjects
Inorganic Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0134-01LFunctional InorganicsW6 credits3GM. Kovalenko, K. Kravchyk, T. Lippert, G. Raino
AbstractThis course covers the synthesis, properties and applications of inorganic materials. In particular, the focus is on photo-active coordination compounds, quasicrystals, nanocrystals (including nanowires), molecular precursors for inorganic materials and metal-organic frameworks.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the structure-property relationship and the design principles of modern inorganic materials for prospective applications in photovoltaics, electrochemical energy storage (e.g. Li-ion batteries), thermoelectrics and photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting.
Content(A) Introduction into the synthesis and atomic structure of modern molecular and crystalline inorganic materials.
-Quasicrystals
-Nanocrystals, including shape engineering
-Molecular precursors (including organometallic and coordination compounds) for inorganic materials
-Metal-organic frameworks
-Photoactive molecules

(B) Applications of inorganic materials:
-photovoltaics
-Li-ion batteries
-Thermoelectrics
-Photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting
-Light-emitting devices etc.
Lecture noteswill be distributed during lectures
Literaturewill be suggested in the lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special knowledge beyond undergraduate curriculum
Research Projects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0200-10LResearch Project I Information W13 credits16ASupervisors
AbstractIn a research project students extend their knowledge in a particular field, get acquainted with the scientific way of working, and learn to work on an actual research topic. Research projects are carried out in a core or optional subject area as chosen by the student.
ObjectiveStudents are accustomed to scientific work and they get to know one specific research field.
529-0201-10LResearch Project II Information W13 credits16ASupervisors
AbstractIn a research project students extend their knowledge in a particular field, get acquainted with the scientific way of working, and learn to work on an actual research topic. Research projects are carried out in a core or optional subject area as chosen by the student.
ObjectiveStudents are accustomed to scientific work and they get to know one specific research field.
Industry Internship or Laboratory Course
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0202-00LIndustry Internship Information W13 creditsSupervisors
AbstractInternship in industry with a minimum duration of 7 weeks
ObjectiveThe aim of the internship is to make students acquainted with industrial work environments. During this time, they will have the opportunity to get involved in current projects of the host institution.
Electives
Students are free to choose from a range of D-CHAB chemistry courses appropriate to their level of study (please note admission requirements). In case of doubt, contact the student administration.
Inorganic Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0134-01LFunctional InorganicsW6 credits3GM. Kovalenko, K. Kravchyk, T. Lippert, G. Raino
AbstractThis course covers the synthesis, properties and applications of inorganic materials. In particular, the focus is on photo-active coordination compounds, quasicrystals, nanocrystals (including nanowires), molecular precursors for inorganic materials and metal-organic frameworks.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the structure-property relationship and the design principles of modern inorganic materials for prospective applications in photovoltaics, electrochemical energy storage (e.g. Li-ion batteries), thermoelectrics and photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting.
Content(A) Introduction into the synthesis and atomic structure of modern molecular and crystalline inorganic materials.
-Quasicrystals
-Nanocrystals, including shape engineering
-Molecular precursors (including organometallic and coordination compounds) for inorganic materials
-Metal-organic frameworks
-Photoactive molecules

(B) Applications of inorganic materials:
-photovoltaics
-Li-ion batteries
-Thermoelectrics
-Photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting
-Light-emitting devices etc.
Lecture noteswill be distributed during lectures
Literaturewill be suggested in the lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special knowledge beyond undergraduate curriculum
529-0144-01LNMR Spectroscopy in Inorganic ChemistryW6 credits3GR. Verel
AbstractTheory and applications of NMR spectroscopy with a focus of its use to problems in Inorganic Chemistry.
The use of the Bloch Equations to describe broadband and selective excitation, measurement techniques and processing strategies of NMR data, applications of NMR to the study of molecular structure, chemical exchange processes, diffusion spectroscopy, and solid-state NMR techniques.
ObjectiveIn depth understanding of both practical and theoretical aspects of solution and solid-state NMR and its application to problems in Inorganic Chemistry
ContentSelection of the following themes:
1. Bloch Equations and its use to understand broadband and selective pulses.
2. Measurement techniques and processing strategies of NMR data.
3. Applications of NMR to the study of molecular structure: Experiments and strategies to solve problems in Inorganic Chemistry.
4. Application of NMR to the study of chemical exchange processes.
5. Application of NMR to the study of self-diffusion and the determination of diffusion coefficients.
6. Differences and similarities between fundamental interactions in solution and solid-state NMR
7. Experimental techniques in solid-state NMR (Magic Angle Spinning, Cross Polarization, Decoupling and Recoupling Techniques, MQMAS)
8. The use of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for the study of surfaces.
Lecture notesA handout is provided during the lectures. It is expected that the students will consult the accompanying literature as specified during the lecture.
LiteratureSpecified during the lecture
Prerequisites / Notice529-0432-00 Physikalische Chemie IV: Magnetische Resonanz
529-0058-00 Analytische Chemie II
(or equivalent)

The individual and in depth (literature) study of a theme related but separate from the themes presented during the lecture requires different compentences compared to the ones which are tested during the oral exam. Therefore the students must give a presentation during the semester about a theme based on their study of the literature. A list of possible themes and corresponding literature will be provided during the lecture.
The student presentation is a mandatory "pass/fail" element of the course and must be passed separately from the oral exam. If the presentation fails it will not be possible to pass the final exam. A renewed presentation is not required in case the oral exam has to be repeated.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
529-0948-00LSolid State Chemistry Restricted registration - show details
Enrollment only possible until 07.02.2023
Participants who have passed the course "Inorganic Chemistry II" will be favoured.
W6 credits10PM. Kovalenko, M. Kotyrba, S. Yakunin
AbstractAn introduction to single crystal growth with the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique and thin film preparation using melt processing and evaporation deposition. Physical characterization of single crystals and thin films.
ObjectiveThe practical laboratory course gives an insight into the growth of single crystals and their applications. Focus lies on the growth of semiconductor crystals, thin film preparation (melt & evaporation technique) of semiconducting materials and the measurement of their physical (optical & electronic) properties. Additionally, the complete work is documented in a detailed scientific report.
ContentThe growth of perovskite (CsPbBr3) semiconductor crystals using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique as a model system for single crystals grown from the melt. Alternatively thin films derived over melt processing or via evaporation deposition are prepared. The preparation of crystals for physical measurements through cutting and polishing. Measuring optical characteristics (absorption) as well as electronic properties, including current-voltage (IV) measurements, time-of-flight, charge carrier recombination, charge extraction efficiencies, noise measurement and photodetection.
Lecture notesElectronic version of the script will be provided.
LiteratureAll references in the script will be provided in .pdf-form, no other sources are needed.
Prerequisites / NoticeEvery participant works on 14 afternoons in a row (Tuesday - Thursday, 13:00 - 18:00) during the semester after being assigned to a group of two participants. No further presence is demanded.
Presence dates:
28.02. - 29.03.2023
01.03. - 30.03.2023
14.03. - 19.04.2023
22.03. - 27.04.2023
30.03. - 09.05.2023
06.04. - 16.05.2023
26.04. - 30.05.2023

Preferences for the personal assignment can be considered.

Electronic enrollment is mandatory. (except ETH-external participants).

Safety concept: Link
Material Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0941-00LIntroduction to Macromolecular ChemistryW4 credits3GD. Opris, T. L. Choi
AbstractBasic definitions, types of polyreactions, constitution of homo- and copolymers, networks, configurative and conformative aspects, contour length, coil formation, mobility, glass temperature, rubber elasticity, molecular weight distribution, energetics of and examples for polyreactions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the significance of molecular size, constitution, configuration and conformation of synthetic and natural macromolecules for their specific physical and chemical properties.
ContentThis introductory course on macromolecular chemistry discusses definitions, introduces types of polyreactions, and compares chain and step-growth polymerizations. It also treats the constitution of polymers, homo- and copolymers, networks, configuration and conformation of polymers. Topics of interest are contour length, coil formation, the mobility in polymers, glass temperature, rubber elasticity, molecular weight distribution, energetics of polyreactions, and examples for polyreactions (polyadditions, polycondensations, polymerizations). Selected polymerization mechanisms and procedures are discussed whenever appropriate throughout the course. Some methods of molecular weight determination are introduced.
Lecture notesCourse materials (consisting of personal notes and distributed paper copies) are sufficient for exam preparation.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be taught in English. Complicated expressions will also be given in German. Questions are welcome in English or German. The written examination will be in English, answers in German are acceptable. A basic chemistry knowledge is required.

PhD students who need recognized credit points are required to pass the written exam.
227-0390-00LElements of MicroscopyW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, G. Csúcs, A. Sologubenko
AbstractThe lecture reviews the basics of microscopy by discussing wave propagation, diffraction phenomena and aberrations. It gives the basics of light microscopy, introducing fluorescence, wide-field, confocal and multiphoton imaging. It further covers 3D electron microscopy and 3D X-ray tomographic micro and nanoimaging.
ObjectiveSolid introduction to the basics of microscopy, either with visible light, electrons or X-rays.
ContentIt would be impossible to imagine any scientific activities without the help of microscopy. Nowadays, scientists can count on very powerful instruments that allow investigating sample down to the atomic level.
The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of microscopy, from wave physics to image formation. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand visible light, electron and X-ray microscopy.
During selected exercises in the lab, several sophisticated instrument will be explained and their capabilities demonstrated.
LiteratureAvailable Online.
402-0468-15LNanomaterials for PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 1UR. Grange
AbstractThe lecture describes various nanomaterials (semiconductor, metal, dielectric, carbon-based...) for photonic applications (optoelectronics, plasmonics, ordered and disordered structures...). It starts with concepts of light-matter interactions, then the fabrication methods, the optical characterization techniques, the description of the properties and the state-of-the-art applications.
ObjectiveThe students will acquire theoretical and experimental knowledge about the different types of nanomaterials (semiconductors, metals, dielectric, carbon-based, ...) and their uses as building blocks for advanced applications in photonics (optoelectronics, plasmonics, photonic crystal, ...). Together with the exercises, the students will learn (1) to read, summarize and discuss scientific articles related to the lecture, (2) to estimate order of magnitudes with calculations using the theory seen during the lecture, (3) to prepare a short oral presentation and report about one topic related to the lecture, and (4) to imagine an original photonic device.
Content1. Introduction to nanomaterials for photonics
a. Classification of nanomaterials
b. Light-matter interaction at the nanoscale
c. Examples of nanophotonic devices

2. Wave physics for nanophotonics
a. Wavelength, wave equation, wave propagation
b. Dispersion relation
c. Interference
d. Scattering and absorption
e. Coherent and incoherent light

3. Analogies between photons and electrons
a. Quantum wave description
b. How to confine photons and electrons
c. Tunneling effects

4. Characterization of Nanomaterials
a. Optical microscopy: Bright and dark field, fluorescence, confocal, High resolution: PALM (STORM), STED
b. Light scattering techniques: DLS
c. Near field microscopy: SNOM
d. Electron microscopy: SEM, TEM
e. Scanning probe microscopy: STM, AFM
f. X-ray diffraction: XRD, EDS

5. Fabrication of nanomaterials
a. Top-down approach
b. Bottom-up approach

6. Plasmonics
a. What is a plasmon, Drude model
b. Surface plasmon and localized surface plasmon (sphere, rod, shell)
c. Theoretical models to calculate the radiated field: electrostatic approximation and Mie scattering
d. Fabrication of plasmonic structures: Chemical synthesis, Nanofabrication
e. Applications

7. Organic and inorganic nanomaterials
a. Organic quantum-confined structure: nanomers and quantum dots.
b. Carbon nanotubes: properties, bandgap description, fabrication
c. Graphene: motivation, fabrication, devices
d. Nanomarkers for biophotonics

8. Semiconductors
a. Crystalline structure, wave function
b. Quantum well: energy levels equation, confinement
c. Quantum wires, quantum dots
d. Optical properties related to quantum confinement
e. Example of effects: absorption, photoluminescence
f. Solid-state-lasers: edge emitting, surface emitting, quantum cascade

9. Photonic crystals
a. Analogy photonic and electronic crystal, in nature
b. 1D, 2D, 3D photonic crystal
c. Theoretical modelling: frequency and time domain technique
d. Features: band gap, local enhancement, superprism...

10. Nanocomposites
a. Effective medium regime
b. Metamaterials
c. Multiple scattering regime
d. Complex media: structural colour, random lasers, nonlinear disorder
Lecture notesSlides and book chapter will be available for downloading
LiteratureReferences will be given during the lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeBasics of solid-state physics (i.e. energy bands) can help
Economics and Technology Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-1008-00LPublic EconomicsW3 credits2VM. Köthenbürger, T. Giommoni
AbstractPublic Economics analyses the role of the government in the economy. In this course we will discuss justifications for and the design of public policy as well as its consequences on market outcomes. Issues related to public goods, taxation, in particular the effects of tax policy on labor supply, entrepreneurship and innovation will be emphasized.
ObjectiveThe primary goal of the course is to familiarize students with the central concepts and principles of public economics. The course aims at providing a good understanding of theoretical work and how it may be applied to actual policy problems. Students will get a good overview of recent key contributions in the field and how these relate to empirical observations.
ContentOverview: The course Public Economics analyses the role of the government in the economy. In most developed countries, government activity is significant and ranges from public service provision, redistribution of incomes, regulation and taxation. In many cases, public expenditures are 30-40 percent of GDP. In the course, we will discuss justifications for and the design of public policy as well as its consequences on market outcomes. We will repeatedly use real-world policy examples to allow students to apply their knowledge and to realize how effectively the knowledge can be used to understand and design public policy making.

Organization: The course consists of four big building blocks, “externalities”, “taxation”, “political economy”, and “social security”. For each of the building blocks we will provide slides. There will be three problem sets and a written exam at the end of the course. Problem sets will not be graded. Credit points are given for passed exams only.
Chemical Aspects of Energy
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0507-00LHands-on Electrochemistry for Energy Storage and Conversion Applications Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: previous attendance of at least one of the following courses is mandatory:
- 529-0659-00L Electrochemistry: Fundamentals, Cells & Applications
- 529-0440-00L Physical Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis
- 529-0191-01L Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage Technologies
- 151-0234-00L Electrochemical Energy Systems
W6 credits6PL. Gubler, E. Fabbri, J. Herranz Salañer, S. Trabesinger
AbstractThe course will provide the students with hands-on laboratory experience in the field of electrochemistry, specifically within the context of energy related applications (i.e., Li-ion and redox flow batteries, fuel cells and electrolyzers).
ObjectiveSolidify the students’ theoretical knowledge of electrochemistry; apply these concepts in the context of energy-related applications; get the students acquainted with different electrochemical techniques, as well as with application-relevant materials and preparation methods.
ContentDay 1: Course introduction, electrochemistry refresher
Day 2: Rotating disk electrode (RDE) studies
Days 3 - 8: 3 x 2-day blocks of laboratory work (rotating assignments):
- Lithium-ion batteries
- Redox flow batteries
- Polymer electrolyte fuel cells
Day 9: finalize data processing, prepare for oral presentation and exam
Day 10 (at ETH): presentations and exam
Lecture notes- The course material will be prepared and provided by the lecturers.
- Students should bring their own laptop
- Origin will be used for data treatment demonstration
LiteratureReferences to academic publications of specific relevance to the experiments to be performed will be included within the courses’ script
Prerequisites / Notice- Course language is english.
- The course will take place at the Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Link).
- The number of participants is limited to 15 (Master level students have priority over PhD students).
- Students are encouraged to bring their own protective gear for the work in the lab (lab coat, safety goggles). If needed, this can also be provided, please contact the organizers in advance.
- Participants need to be insured (health / accident insurance).
- On-site accommodation at the PSI guesthouse (Link) is possible and will be arranged.

Admittance criterion: previous attendance of at least one of the following courses is mandatory:
- 529-0659-00L Electrochemistry: Fundamentals, Cells & Applications
- 529-0440-00L Physical Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis
- 529-0191-01L Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage Technologies
- 151-0234-00L Electrochemical Energy Systems
Physical Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0014-00LAdvanced Magnetic Resonance - Relaxation Information W6 credits3GM. Ernst
AbstractThe course is for advanced students and covers relaxation theory in magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to familiarize students with the theory behind relaxation phenomena in magnetic resonance. Starting from a theoretical description of magnetic resonance, Redfield theory will be developed and applications to liquid-state and solid-state NMR will be discussed. In the end, students should be able to read and understand research publications in the field of magnetic resonance relaxation.
ContentThe lecture will discuss Hamiltonian in Magnetic Resonance that are important for relaxation phenomena. Building on this, Redfield theory will be discussed and put into context with other relaxation theories used in Magnetic Resonance. To illustrate the working of Redfield theory, relaxation a simple two-spin model will be calculated in extensive detail. Building on this, selected topics from relaxation in liquids and solids are discussed so that at the end a reasonable overview of the field is given.
Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of NMR, e.g. as covered in the Lecture Physical Chemistry IV, or the book by Malcolm Levitt.
Lecture notesA script which covers the topics will be distributed in the lecture and will be accessible through the web page Link
LiteratureJ. Kowalewski, L. Mäler, Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Liquids, CRC Press, 2006.
J. McConnell, The Theory of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation in Liquids, Cambridge University Press, 2009.
529-0445-01LAdvanced Optics and SpectroscopyW6 credits3GR. Signorell, G. David
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to the interaction of light with nano- and microparticles followed by an overview of applications of current interest. Examples range from nanoparticles for medical applications and sensing to the role of the interaction of solar radiation with aerosol particles and cloud droplets for the climate.
ObjectiveThe students will be introduced to the basic concepts of the interaction of light with nano- and microparticles. The combination of basic concepts with different applications will enable students to apply their knowledge to new problems in various fields where nanoscale objects play a role.
ContentLight interacts surprisingly differently with small particles than with bulk or with gas phase materials. The first part of the course provides a basic but rigorous introduction into the interaction of light with nano- and microparticles. The emphasis is on the classical treatment of absorption and scattering of light by small particles. The strengths and limits of this conventional approach will be discussed. The second part of the course is devoted to a broad range of applications. Here topics include: Plasmon resonances in metallic systems, metallo-dielectric nanoparticles for medical applications, the use of lasers for optical trapping and characterization of single particles, vibrational excitons in dielectric nanoparticles, interaction of light with aerosol particles and cloud droplets for remote sensing applications and climate predictions, characterization of ultrafine aerosol particles by photoemission using velocity map imaging.
Lecture noteswill be distributed during the course
LiteratureBasics: Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles, C. F. Bohren and D. R. Huffman, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Applications: References will be provided during the course.
Analytical Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0059-00LNanoscale Molecular ImagingW3 credits2GN. Kumar, R. Zenobi
AbstractThis course will provide fundamental knowledge about the principal analytical techniques for nanoscale molecular imaging. In addition to the basic concepts, students will also learn the application of advanced molecular characterization tools to solve problems in the chemical, biological and material sciences.
ObjectiveThis course will provide fundamental knowledge about the principal analytical techniques for nanoscale molecular imaging. In addition to the basic concepts, students will also learn the application of advanced molecular characterization tools to solve problems in the chemical, biological and material sciences.
ContentNanoscale molecular imaging using fluorescence spectroscopy:
- Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED)
- Saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM)
- Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM)
- Photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM)


Nanoscale molecular imaging using Raman spectroscopy:
- Scanning near-field optical microscopy (aperture SNOM)
- Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS): Based on atomic force
microscopy (AFM) & scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM)

Nanoscale molecular imaging using infra-red (IR) spectroscopy:
- Nanoscale Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (Nano-FTIR)
- Photo-induced force microscopy (AFM-IR)

Nanoscale molecular imaging using ions:
- Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS)

Single molecule imaging techniques:
- Scanning probe microscopy: STM & AFM
- Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-TERS
- Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)
Lecture notesLecture notes will be made available online.
LiteratureInformation about relevant literature will be available in the lecture & in the lecture notes.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
529-0042-00LStructure Elucidation by NMRW4 credits2GM.‑O. Ebert
AbstractStructure Elucidation of Complex Organic Molecules by NMR
ObjectiveStructure elucidation of complex organic molecules (including peptides, oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides) by advanced 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy: Finding the constitution, rel. configuration and the conformation of an unkown molecule. The emphasis of the course is on the selection of optimal strategies for the solution of a given problem. Discussing and solving these problems by the combined application of various 2D methods form an important part of the course. This also includes the use of state-of-the-art methods for computer assisted structure elucdation (CASE) and chemical shift prediction.
ContentImportant experiments for structure elucidation. Finding the optimal strategy for a given problem. Spectral processing for optimal results. Spectral interpretation. Assignment strategies for complex molecules. Common Artefacts. Computer assisted structure elucidation incl. introduction to relevant software and hands-on application. Chemical shift prediction. Discussion of challenging problem sets during class.
Lecture notesScripts (in English) are distributed in the course
Literature"T.D.W. Claridge, High Resolution NMR Techniques in Organic Chemistryî, Pergamon Press, 1999. (NMR Teil)

Further reading and citations are listed in the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course language is English.
Required level:
Courses in analytical chemistry of the 2nd year or equivalent.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
Organic Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0242-00LSupramolecular ChemistryW6 credits3GY. Yamakoshi, B. M. Lewandowski
AbstractPrinciples of molecular recognition: cation/anion complexation and their technological applications; complexation of neutral molecules in aqueous solution; non-covalent interactions involving aromatic rings; hydrogen bonding; molecular sef-assembly - a chemical approach towards nanostructures; thermodynamics and kinetics of complexation processes; synthesis of receptors; template effects.
ObjectiveThe objective of this class is to reach an understanding of the nature and magnitude of the intermolecular interactions and solvation effects that provide the driving force for the association between molecules and/or ions induced by non-covalent bonding interactions. The lecture (2 h) is complemented by a problem solving class (1 h) which focuses on receptor syntheses and other synthetic aspects of supramolecular chemistry.
ContentPrinciples of molecular recognition: cation complexation, anion complexation, cation and anion complexation in technological applications, complexation of neutral molecules in aqueous solution, non-covalent interactions involving aromatic rings, hydrogen bonding, molecular sef-assembly - a chemical approach towards nanostructures, thermodynamics and kinetics of complexation processes, synthesis of receptors, template effects.
Lecture notesPrinted lecture notes will be available for purchase at the beginning of the class. Problem sets and answer keys will be available on-line.
LiteratureNo compulsory textbooks. Literature for further reading will be presented during the class and cited in the lecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisite: classes in organic and physical chemistry of the first two years of studies.
529-0077-00LBiosynthesis of Fragrant and Medicinal Natural ProductsW3 credits2GF. Flachsmann
AbstractNatural products from a biosynthetic perspective. You will learn how living cells make terpenoids, fatty acids, polyketides and alkaloids, exemplified with fragrant molecules and pharmaceutically active natural products (with many examples to smell). The course requires a solid background in synthetic organic chemistry and includes regular exercises.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, you will be able to formulate educated biogenetic hypotheses on any natural product.
ContentTerpenes – Saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and derived products – Polyketides – Shikimates – Alkaloids.
Lecture notesP. Dewick, Medicinal Natural Products, 3rd edition, und PDF Handouts des Dozenten.
Environmental Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0052-00LConcepts and Tools for Sustainable Chemicals ManufactureW4 credits2GS. J. Mitchell, G. Guillén Gosálbez, J. Pérez-Ramírez
AbstractSustainable chemistry embodies the design and efficient manufacture of chemicals from abundant and renewable raw materials using routes that minimize energy requirements, avoid damaging the environment and human health, and are economically viable. It is a powerful tool to help society achieve several of the Sustainable Development Goals identified by the United Nations.
ObjectiveThis course introduces tools to design and evaluate sustainable routes for chemicals and materials manufacture. You will understand approaches to process design and optimization, from the molecular to the planet level, and learn the fundamentals of sustainable chemistry.
Content- Introduction to green versus sustainable chemistry
- Sustainability dimensions and metrics
- Corporate sustainability, economics, and policy
- Renewable energy conversions
- Alternative carbon sources for chemicals
- Other resources including precious metals and solvents
- Chemistry of recycling
- Chemical fate and toxicological effects
- Industrial view
Each topic will be presented by a lecturer or guest speaker with relevant expertise.
Lecture notesCourse content based on slides
LiteratureKlöpffer, W., Grahl, B. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA): A Guide to Best Practice, Wiley (2014)
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special knowledge beyond the undergraduate curriculum in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering. Students wishing to attend the course from other backgrounds should contact the lecturers to discuss the fit.
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0500-10LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Only students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their Master's thesis:
a. successful completion of the Bachelor's programme;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the Master's programme.

Duration of the Master's Thesis 20 weeks.
O25 credits54DSupervisors
AbstractIn the Master thesis students prove their ability to independent, structured and scientific working. The Master thesis is usually carried out in a core or optional subject area as chosen by the student.
ObjectiveIn the Master Thesis students prove their ability to independent, structured and scientific working.
  •  Page  1  of  2 Next page Last page     All