Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Mechanical Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
Energy, Flows and Processes
The courses listed in this category “Core Courses” are recommended. Alternative courses can be chosen in agreement with the tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0105-00LImaging in Fluid Dynamics
Note: The previous course title until HS21 "Quantitative Flow Visualization"
W4 credits3GF. Coletti
AbstractThis is a laboratory-based course on imaging techniques for the measurement of fluid flow properties. Modern approaches are presented, including particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry, applied in various experimental facilities. Students obtain first-hand experience with such techniques in laboratory sessions, using high-speed/high-resolution cameras in wind/water tunnels.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the working principles of modern flow imaging and velocimetry
Understanding of hardware and software requirements to achieve desired spatio-temporal resolution.
Ability to carry out imaging experiments in actual laboratory flows, and interpreting meaningfully the results.
ContentBasics of optical diagnostics.
Conception of laboratory flow experiment to be characterized by imaging, with focus on the spatial and temporal scales at play.
Laboratory experiments including:
- characterization of vortex shedding by wake visualization and liquid crystal thermography.
- Eulerian flow field in turbulent flow by particle image velocimetry
- Lagrangian flow field in turbulent flow by particle tracking velocimetry
- fluid-structure interaction in wind tunnel by high-speed imaging.
Lecture notesHandouts will be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Fluid Dynamics, basic programming skills.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
151-0107-20LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) I Information W4 credits4GS. M. Martin, J. H. Walther
AbstractThis course gives an introduction into algorithms and numerical methods for parallel computing on shared and distributed memory architectures. The algorithms and methods are supported with problems that appear frequently in science and engineering.
ObjectiveWith manufacturing processes reaching its limits in terms of transistor density on today’s computing architectures, efficient utilization of computing resources must include parallel execution to maintain scaling. The use of computers in academia, industry and society is a fundamental tool for problem solving today while the “think parallel” mind-set of developers is still lagging behind.

The aim of the course is to introduce the student to the fundamentals of parallel programming using shared and distributed memory programming models. The goal is on learning to apply these techniques with the help of examples frequently found in science and engineering and to deploy them on large scale high performance computing (HPC) architectures.
Content1. Hardware and Architecture: Moore’s Law, Instruction set architectures (MIPS, RISC, CISC), Instruction pipelines, Caches, Flynn’s taxonomy, Vector instructions (for Intel x86)

2. Shared memory parallelism: Threads, Memory models, Cache coherency, Mutual exclusion, Uniform and Non-Uniform memory access, Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP)

3. Distributed memory parallelism: Message Passing Interface (MPI), Point-to-Point and collective communication, Blocking and non-blocking methods, Parallel file I/O, Hybrid programming models

4. Performance and parallel efficiency analysis: Performance analysis of algorithms, Roofline model, Amdahl’s Law, Strong and weak scaling analysis

5. Applications: HPC Math libraries, Linear Algebra and matrix/vector operations, Singular value decomposition, Neural Networks and linear autoencoders, Solving partial differential equations (PDEs) using grid-based and particle methods
Lecture notesLink
Class notes, handouts
Literature• An Introduction to Parallel Programming, P. Pacheco, Morgan Kaufmann
• Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein, CRC Press
• Computer Organization and Design, D.H. Patterson and J.L. Hennessy, Morgan Kaufmann
• Vortex Methods, G.H. Cottet and P. Koumoutsakos, Cambridge University Press
• Lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should be familiar with a compiled programming language (C, C++ or Fortran). Exercises and exams will be designed using C++. The course will not teach basics of programming. Some familiarity using the command line is assumed. Students should also have a basic understanding of diffusion and advection processes, as well as their underlying partial differential equations.
151-0109-00LTurbulent FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractContents
- Laminar and turbulent flows, instability and origin of turbulence - Statistical description: averaging, turbulent energy, dissipation, closure problem - Scalings. Homogeneous isotropic turbulence, correlations, Fourier representation, energy spectrum - Free turbulence: wake, jet, mixing layer - Wall turbulence: Channel and boundary layer - Computation and modelling of turbulent flows
ObjectiveBasic physical phenomena of turbulent flows, quantitative and statistical description, basic and averaged equations, principles of turbulent flow computation and elements of turbulence modelling
Content- Properties of laminar, transitional and turbulent flows.
- Origin and control of turbulence. Instability and transition.
- Statistical description, averaging, equations for mean and fluctuating quantities, closure problem.
- Scalings, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, energy spectrum.
- Turbulent free shear flows. Jet, wake, mixing layer.
- Wall-bounded turbulent flows.
- Turbulent flow computation and modeling.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available
LiteratureS.B. Pope, Turbulent Flows, Cambridge University Press, 2000
151-0125-00LHydrodynamics and CavitationW4 credits3GO. Supponen
AbstractThis course builds on the foundations of fluid dynamics to describe hydrodynamic flows and provides an introduction to cavitation.
ObjectiveThe main learning objectives of this course are:
1. Identify and describe dominant effects in liquid fluid flows through physical modelling.
2. Identify hydrodynamic instabilities and discuss the stability region
3. Describe fragmentation of liquids
4. Explain tension, nucleation and phase-change in liquids.
5. Describe hydrodynamic cavitation and its consequences in physical terms.
6. Recognise experimental techniques and industrial and medical applications for cavitation.
ContentThe course gives an overview on the following topics: hydrostatics, capillarity, hydrodynamic instabilities, fragmentation. Tension in liquids, phase change. Cavitation: single bubbles (nucleation, dynamics, collapse), cavitating flows (attached, cloud, vortex cavitation). Industrial applications and measurement techniques.
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts
LiteratureLiterature will be provided in the course material.
Prerequisites / NoticeFluid dynamics I & II or equivalent
151-0163-00LNuclear Energy ConversionW4 credits2V + 1UA. Manera
AbstractPhyiscal fundamentals of the fission reaction and the sustainable chain reaction, thermal design, construction, function and operation of nuclear reactors and power plants, light water reactors and other reactor types, converion and breeding
ObjectiveStudents get an overview on energy conversion in nuclear power plants, on construction and function of the most important types of nuclear reactors with special emphasis to light water reactors. They obtain the mathematical/physical basis for quantitative assessments concerning most relevant aspects of design, dynamic behaviour as well as material and energy flows.
ContentNuclear physics of fission and chain reaction. Themodynamics of nuclear reactors. Design of the rector core. Introduction into the dynamic behaviour of nuclear reactors. Overview on types of nuclear reactors, difference between thermal reactors and fast breaders. Construction and operation of nuclear power plants with pressurized and boiling water reactors, role and function of the most important safety systems, special features of the energy conversion. Development tendencies of rector technology.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be distributed. Additional literature and information on the website of the lab: Link
LiteratureS. Glasston & A. Sesonke: Nuclear Reactor Engineering, Reactor System Engineering, Ed. 4, Vol. 2., Springer-Science+Business Media, B.V.

R. L. Murray: Nuclear Energy (Sixth Edition), An Introduction to the Concepts, Systems, and Applications of Nuclear Processes, Elsevier
151-0209-00LRenewable Energy Technologies Information W4 credits3GA. Steinfeld, E. Casati
AbstractRenewable energy technologies: solar PV, solar thermal, biomass, wind, geothermal, hydro, waste-to-energy. Focus is on the engineering aspects.
ObjectiveStudents learn the potential and limitations of renewable energy technologies and their contribution towards sustainable energy utilization.
Lecture notesLecture Notes containing copies of the presented slides.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: strong background on the fundamentals of engineering thermodynamics, equivalent to the material taught in the courses Thermodynamics I, II, and III of D-MAVT.
151-0213-00LFluid Dynamics with the Lattice Boltzmann MethodW4 credits3GI. Karlin
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to theoretical foundations and practical usage of the Lattice Boltzmann Method for fluid dynamics simulations.
ObjectiveMethods like molecular dynamics, DSMC, lattice Boltzmann etc are being increasingly used by engineers all over and these methods require knowledge of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics which are traditionally not taught at engineering departments. The goal of this course is to give an introduction to ideas of kinetic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics with a focus on developing simulation algorithms and their realizations.

During the course, students will be able to develop a lattice Boltzmann code on their own. Practical issues about implementation and performance on parallel machines will be demonstrated hands on.

Central element of the course is the completion of a lattice Boltzmann code (using the framework specifically designed for this course).

The course will also include a review of topics of current interest in various fields of fluid dynamics, such as multiphase flows, reactive flows, microflows among others.

Optionally, we offer an opportunity to complete a project of student's choice as an alternative to the oral exam. Samples of projects completed by previous students will be made available.
ContentThe course builds upon three parts:
I Elementary kinetic theory and lattice Boltzmann simulations introduced on simple examples.
II Theoretical basis of statistical mechanics and kinetic equations.
III Lattice Boltzmann method for real-world applications.

The content of the course includes:

1. Background: Elements of statistical mechanics and kinetic theory:
Particle's distribution function, Liouville equation, entropy, ensembles; Kinetic theory: Boltzmann equation for rarefied gas, H-theorem, hydrodynamic limit and derivation of Navier-Stokes equations, Chapman-Enskog method, Grad method, boundary conditions; mean-field interactions, Vlasov equation;
Kinetic models: BGK model, generalized BGK model for mixtures, chemical reactions and other fluids.

2. Basics of the Lattice Boltzmann Method and Simulations:
Minimal kinetic models: lattice Boltzmann method for single-component fluid, discretization of velocity space, time-space discretization, boundary conditions, forcing, thermal models, mixtures.

3. Hands on:
Development of the basic lattice Boltzmann code and its validation on standard benchmarks (Taylor-Green vortex, lid-driven cavity flow etc).

4. Practical issues of LBM for fluid dynamics simulations:
Lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent flows;
numerical stability and accuracy.

5. Microflow:
Rarefaction effects in moderately dilute gases; Boundary conditions, exact solutions to Couette and Poiseuille flows; micro-channel simulations.

6. Advanced lattice Boltzmann methods:
Entropic lattice Boltzmann scheme, subgrid simulations at high Reynolds numbers; Boundary conditions for complex geometries.

7. Introduction to LB models beyond hydrodynamics:
Relativistic fluid dynamics; flows with phase transitions.
Lecture notesLecture notes on the theoretical parts of the course will be made available.
Selected original and review papers are provided for some of the lectures on advanced topics.
Handouts and basic code framework for implementation of the lattice Boltzmann models will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course addresses mainly graduate students (MSc/Ph D) but BSc students can also attend.
151-0215-00LFundamentals of Acoustics Restricted registration - show details
Note: The previous course title until HS21 "Engineering Acoustics I"
W4 credits3GN. Noiray, B. Van Damme
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to acoustics. It focusses on fundamental phenomena of airborne and structure-borne sound waves. The lecture combines theoretical principles with practical insights and interpretations.
ObjectiveThis course is proposed for Master and PhD students interested in getting knowledge in acoustics. Students will be able to understand, describe analytically and interpret sound generation, absorption and propagation.
ContentFirst, magnitudes characterizing sound propagation are reviewed and the constitutive equations for acoustics are derived. Then the different types of sources (monopole/dipole/quadrupole, punctual, non-compact) are introduced and linked to the noise generated by turbulent flows, coherent vortical structures or fluctuating heat release. The scattering of sound by rigid bodies is given in basic configurations. Analytical, experimental and numerical methods used to analyze sound in ducts and rooms are presented (Green functions, Galerkin expansions, Helmholtz solvers).
The second part covers elastic wave phenomena, such as dispersion and vibration modes, in infinite and finite structures.
Lecture notesHandouts will be distributed during the class
LiteratureBooks will be recommended for each chapter
151-0216-00LWind EnergyW4 credits2V + 1UN. Chokani
AbstractThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals, technologies, modern day application, and economics of wind energy. These subjects are introduced through a discussion of the basic principles of wind energy generation and conversion, and a detailed description of the broad range of relevant technical, economic and environmental topics.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals, technologies, modern day application, and economics of wind energy.
ContentThis mechanical engineering course focuses on the technical aspects of wind turbines; non-technical issues are not within the scope of this technically oriented course. On completion of this course, the student shall be able to conduct the preliminary aerodynamic and structural design of the wind turbine blades. The student shall also be more aware of the broad context of drivetrains, dynamics and control, electrical systems, and meteorology, relevant to all types of wind turbines.
151-0221-00LIntroduction to Modeling and Optimization of Sustainable Energy SystemsW4 credits4GG. Sansavini, A. Bardow
AbstractThis course introduces the fundamentals of energy system modeling for the analysis and the optimization of the energy system design and operations.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, students will be able to:
- define and quantify the key performance indicators of sustainable energy systems;
- select and apply appropriate models for conversion, storage and transport of energy;
- develop mathematical models for the analysis, design and operations of multi-energy systems and solve them with appropriate mathematical tools;
- select and apply methodologies for the uncertainty analysis on energy systems models;
- apply the acquired knowledge to tackle the challenges of the energy transition.

In the course "Introduction to Modeling and Optimization of Sustainable Energy Systems", the competencies of process understanding, system understanding, modeling, concept development, data analysis & interpretation and measurement methods are taught, applied and examined. Programming is applied.
ContentThe global energy transition; Key performance indicators of sustainable energy systems; Optimization models; Heat integration and heat exchanger networks; Life-cycle assessment; Models for conversion, storage and transport technologies; Multi-energy systems; Design, operations and analysis of energy systems; Uncertainties in energy system modeling.
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documentation will be available online. Reference to appropriate book chapters and scientific papers will be provided.
151-0227-00LBasics of Air Transport (Aviation I)W4 credits3GP. Wild
AbstractIn general the course explains the main principles of air transport and elaborates on simple interdisciplinary topics.
Working on broad 14 different topics like aerodynamics, manufacturers, airport operations, business aviation, business models etc. the students get a good overview in air transportation.
The program is taught in English and we provide 11 different experts/lecturers.
ObjectiveThe goal is to understand and explain basics, principles and contexts of the broader air transport industry.
Further, we provide the tools for starting a career in the air transport industry. The knowledge may also be used for other modes of transport.
Ideal foundation for Aviation II - Management of Air Transport.
ContentWeekly: 1h independent preparation; 2h lectures and 1 h training with an expert in the respective field

Concept: This course will be tought as Aviation I. A subsequent course - Aviation II - covers the "Management of Air Transport".

Content: Transport as part of the overall transportation scheme; Aerodynamics; Aircraft (A/C) Designs & Structures; A/C Operations; Aviation Law; Maintenance & Manufacturers; Airport Operations & Planning; Aviation Security; ATC & Airspace; Air Freight; General Aviation; Business Jet Operations; Business models within Airline Industry; Military Aviation.

Technical visit: This course includes a guided tour at Zurich Airport and Dubendorf Airfield (baggage sorting system, apron, Tower & Radar Simulator at Skyguide Dubendorf).
Lecture notesPreparation materials & slides are provided prior to each class
LiteratureLiterature will be provided by the lecturers, respectively there will be additional Information upon registration (normally available in Moodle)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is planned as class teaching.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
151-0251-00LPrinciples, Efficiency Optimization and Future Applications of IC EnginesW4 credits2V + 1UY. Wright, P. Soltic
AbstractFuture Relevance of IC engines for transportation and Power-on-Demand. Characteristic performance parameters, operating maps and duty cycles. Thermodynamic cycles and energetic optimization. In-cylinder flows, convective and radiative heat transfer, combustion modes, boosting and simulation methods. Hybrid powertrains, decentralized power/heat cogeneration and use of renewable/e-fuels.
ObjectiveThe students get familiar with operating characteristics and efficiency maximization methods of IC engines for propulsion and decentralized electricity (and heat) generation. To this end, they learn about simulation methods and related experimental techniques for performance assessment in a combination of lectures and exercises.
ContentThis lecture aims at introducing the students to the working principles and efficiency optimization methods for Internal Combustion (IC) engines which are expected to continue to play a very important role in transportation (long-haul heavy duty, marine) and decentralized combined heat and power generation. Following an overview of different applications and powertrains, the course will focus on the following topics: First, a generic overview of the history of IC-Engines is given, and the basic dimensions and specific engine-relevant terminology are introduced. Next, operating maps for different duty cycles are discussed, highlighting the benefits of individual powertrain configurations for different usage scenarios. The high-pressure thermodynamic process and combustion-induced heat release are analyzed in detail and the design of the combustion processes is discussed in view of further optimization of the energy conversion efficiency. The concept of boosting, its challenges and potential are also presented. In addition, flow field characteristics, convective and radiative heat transfer and combustion modes (Otto, Diesel and “multi-mode” cycles) will be discussed along with possible simulation methods. The course consists of lectures combined with exercises. In addition, several invited guest talks will be held by representatives from Swiss industrial companies active in this field. Provided the pandemic measures allow, visits to different engine test facilities are further envisioned.
LiteratureJ. Heywood, Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course provides background for the course 151-0254-00L “Environmental Aspects of Future Mobility” held in the Spring Semester, where the focus is on emission formation and minimization, exhaust gas after treatment systems and potentials of future synthetic/e-fuels in IC engines; all given in the broader context of a future mobility/transportation options (battery electric, hybrids, fuel cells etc.) and transformation pathways towards sustainability.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
151-0368-00LAeroelasticityW4 credits2V + 1UM. Righi
AbstractIntroduction to the basics and methods of Aeroelasticity. An overview of the main static and dynamic phenomena arising from the interaction between structural and aerodynamic loads.
ObjectiveThe course will provide a basic physical understanding of flow-structure interaction. You will get to know the most important phenomena in the static and dynamic aeroelasticity, as well as a presentation of the most relevant analytical and numerical prediction methods.
ContentIntroduction to steady and unsteady thin airfoil theory, extension to three dimension wing aerodynamics, strip theory, overview of numerical methods available (panel methods, CFD).

Introduction to unsteady aerodynamics (theory): Theodorsen and Wagner functions. Unsteady aerodynamics observed from numerical experiments (CFD). Generation of simplified mathematical models.

Presentation of steady aeroelasticity: equations of equilibrium for the typical section, aeroelastic deformation, effectiveness of the aeroelastic system, stability (definition), divergence condition, role played by a control surface, control effectiveness, sweep angle, aeroelastic tailoring of bending-torsion coupling. Ritz model to model beams, use of FEM, modal condensation, choice of generalized coordinates.

Presentation of dynamic aeroelasticity: assessment of dynamic aeroelastic response of simple systems. Flutter kinematics (bending-twisting). Dynamic response of a simplified wing.

Numerical aeroelasticity (Test Cases extracted from the latest AIAA Aeroelastic Prediction Workshops).

Aeroelasticity of modern aircraft: assessment of the effects induced by the control surfaces and control systems (Aeroservoelasticity), active controlled aircraft, flutter-suppression systems, certification (EASA, FAA).

Planning and execution of Wind Tunnel experiments with aeroelastic models. Live-execution of an experiment in the WT of the ETH.

Brief presentation of non-linear phenomena like Limit-Cycle Oscillations (LCO)
Lecture notesA script in English language is available.
LiteratureBispilnghoff Ashley, Aeroelasticity
Abbott, Theory of Wing sections,
Y. C. Fung, An Introduction to the Theory of Aeroelasticity, Dover Phoenix Editions.
151-0709-00LStochastic Methods for Engineers and Natural ScientistsW4 credits4GD. W. Meyer-Massetti
AbstractThe course provides an introduction into stochastic methods that are applicable for example for the description and modeling of turbulent and subsurface flows. Moreover, mathematical techniques are presented that are used to quantify uncertainty in various engineering applications.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course you should be able to mathematically describe random quantities and their effect on physical systems. Moreover, you should be able to develop basic stochastic models of such systems.
Content- Probability theory, single and multiple random variables, mappings of random variables
- Estimation of statistical moments and probability densities based on data
- Stochastic differential equations, Ito calculus, PDF evolution equations
- Monte Carlo integration with importance and stratified sampling
- Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampling
- Control-variate and multi-level Monte Carlo estimation
- Statistical tests for means and goodness-of-fit
All topics are illustrated with engineering applications.
Lecture notesDetailed lecture notes will be provided.
LiteratureSome textbooks related to the material covered in the course:
Stochastic Methods: A Handbook for the Natural and Social Sciences, Crispin Gardiner, Springer, 2010
The Fokker-Planck Equation: Methods of Solutions and Applications, Hannes Risken, Springer, 1996
Turbulent Flows, S.B. Pope, Cambridge University Press, 2000
Spectral Methods for Uncertainty Quantification, O.P. Le Maitre and O.M. Knio, Springer, 2010
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
151-0851-00LRobot Dynamics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2V + 2UM. Hutter, R. Siegwart
AbstractWe will provide an overview on how to kinematically and dynamically model typical robotic systems such as robot arms, legged robots, rotary wing systems, or fixed wing.
ObjectiveThe primary objective of this course is that the student deepens an applied understanding of how to model the most common robotic systems. The student receives a solid background in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. On the basis of state of the art applications, he/she will learn all necessary tools to work in the field of design or control of robotic systems.
ContentThe course consists of three parts: First, we will refresh and deepen the student's knowledge in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. In this context, the learning material will build upon the courses for mechanics and dynamics available at ETH, with the particular focus on their application to robotic systems. The goal is to foster the conceptual understanding of similarities and differences among the various types of robots. In the second part, we will apply the learned material to classical robotic arms as well as legged systems and discuss kinematic constraints and interaction forces. In the third part, focus is put on modeling fixed wing aircraft, along with related design and control concepts. In this context, we also touch aerodynamics and flight mechanics to an extent typically required in robotics. The last part finally covers different helicopter types, with a focus on quadrotors and the coaxial configuration which we see today in many UAV applications. Case studies on all main topics provide the link to real applications and to the state of the art in robotics.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe contents of the following ETH Bachelor lectures or equivalent are assumed to be known: Mechanics and Dynamics, Control, Basics in Fluid Dynamics.
151-0917-00LMass TransferW4 credits2V + 2US. E. Pratsinis, V. Mavrantzas, C.‑J. Shih
AbstractThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ObjectiveThis course presents the fundamentals of transport phenomena with emphasis on mass transfer. The physical significance of basic principles is elucidated and quantitatively described. Furthermore the application of these principles to important engineering problems is demonstrated.
ContentFick's laws; application and significance of mass transfer; comparison of Fick's laws with Newton's and Fourier's laws; derivation of Fick's 2nd law; diffusion in dilute and concentrated solutions; rotating disk; dispersion; diffusion coefficients, viscosity and heat conduction (Pr and Sc numbers); Brownian motion; Stokes-Einstein equation; mass transfer coefficients (Nu and Sh numbers); mass transfer across interfaces; Analogies for mass-, heat-, and momentum transfer in turbulent flows; film-, penetration-, and surface renewal theories; simultaneous mass, heat and momentum transfer (boundary layers); homogeneous and heterogeneous reversible and irreversible reactions; diffusion-controlled reactions; mass transfer and first order heterogeneous reaction. Applications.
LiteratureCussler, E.L.: "Diffusion", 3nd edition, Cambridge University Press, 2009.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents attending this highly-demanding course are expected to allocate sufficient time within their weekly schedule to successfully conduct the exercises.
151-0927-00LRate-Controlled Separations in Fine ChemistryW6 credits3V + 1UM. Mazzotti, V. Becattini
AbstractThe students are supposed to obtain detailed insight into the fundamentals of separation processes that are frequently applied in modern life science processes in particular, fine chemistry and biotechnology, and in energy-related applications.
ObjectiveThe students are supposed to obtain detailed insight into the fundamentals of separation processes that are frequently applied in modern life sicence processes in particular, fine chemistry and biotechnology.
ContentThe class covers separation techniques that are central in the purification and downstream processing of chemicals and bio-pharmaceuticals. Examples from both areas illustrate the utility of the methods: 1) Adsorption and chromatography; 2) Membrane processes; 3) Crystallization and precipitation.
Lecture notesHandouts during the class
LiteratureRecommendations for text books will be covered in the class
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements (recommended, not mandatory): Thermal separation Processes I (151-0926-00) and Modelling and mathematical methods in process and chemical engineering (151-0940-00)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
151-0951-00LProcess Design and SafetyW4 credits2V + 1UF. Trachsel, C. Hutter
AbstractThe lecture Process Design and Saftey deals with the fundamentals of project management, scale-up, dimensioning and safety of chemical process equipment and plants.
ObjectiveThe objective of the lecture is to expound the engineering design approach of important elements in chemical plant design.
ContentFundamentals in Chemical engineering Design;
Project Management,
Cost estimate,
Materials and Corrosion,
Piping and Armatures,
Pumps,
Reactors and Scale-up,
Safety of chemical processes,
Patents
Lecture notesThe lecture slides will be distributed.
LiteratureCoulson and Richardson's: Chemical Engineering , Vol 6: Chemical Engineering Design, (1996)
Prerequisites / NoticeA 1-day excursion including a visit of a chemical plant will be part of the lecture.
151-1116-00LIntroduction to Aircraft and Car AerodynamicsW4 credits3GM. Immer, F. Schröder
AbstractAircraft aerodynamics: Atmosphere; aerodynamic forces (lift, drag); thrust.
Vehicle aerodynamics: Aerodynamic and mass forces, drag, lift, car aerodynamics and performence. Passenger cars, trucks, racing cars.
ObjectiveAn introduction to the basic principles and interrelationships of aircraft and automotive aerodynamics.
To understand the basic relations of the origin of aerodynamic forces (ie lift, drag). To quantify the aerodynamic forces for basic configurations of aircraft and car components.
Illustration of the intrinsic problems and results using examples.
Using experimental and theoretical methods to illustrate possibilities and limits.
ContentAircraft aerodynamics: atmosphere, aerodynamic forces (ascending force: profile, wings. Resistance, residual resistance, induced resistance); thrust (overview of the propulsion system, aerodynamics of the propellers), introduction to static longitudinal stability.

Automobile aerodynamics: Basic principles: aerodynamic force and the force of inertia, resistance, drive, aerodynamic and driving performance. Cars commercial vehicles, racing cars.
Lecture notesPreparation materials & slides are provided prior to each class
LiteratureAircraft Aerodynamics:
- Anderson Jr, John D: Introduction to Flight, Mc Graw Hill, Ed 06, 2007; ISBN: 9780073529394
- Mc Cormick, B.W.: Aerodynamics, Aeronautics and Flight Mechanics, John Wiley and Sons, 1979
- Wilcox, David C, Basic Fluid Mechanics. DCW Industries, Inc., 1997
- Schlichting,H. und Truckenbrodt, E: Aerodynamik des Flugzeuges (Bd I und II), Springer Verlag, 1960
- Abbott, I. and van Doenhoff, A.: Theory of Wing Sections, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1949
- Hoerner, S.F.: Fluid Dynamic Drag, Hoerner Fluid Dynamics, 1951/1965
- Hoerner, S.F.: Fluid Dynamic Lift, Hoerner Fluid Dynamics, 1975
- Perkins, C.D. and Hage, R.E.: Airplane Performance, Stability and Control, John Wiley ans Sons, 1949

Vehicle Aerodynamics
- Hucho, Wolf-Heinrich: Aerodynamics of Road Vehicles, SAE International, 1998
- Gillespi, Thomas D: Fundamentals of Vehicle Dynamics, SAE, 1992
- Katz Joseph: New Directions in Race Car Aerodynamics, Robert Bentley Publishers, 1995
101-0187-00LStructural Reliability and Risk AnalysisW3 credits2GS. Marelli
AbstractStructural reliability aims at quantifying the probability of failure of systems due to uncertainties in their design, manufacturing and environmental conditions. Risk analysis combines this information with the consequences of failure in view of optimal decision making. The course presents the underlying probabilistic modelling and computational methods for reliability and risk assessment.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students with a thorough understanding of the key concepts behind structural reliability and risk analysis. After this course the students will have refreshed their knowledge of probability theory and statistics to model uncertainties in view of engineering applications. They will be able to analyze the reliability of a structure and to use risk assessment methods for decision making under uncertain conditions. They will be aware of the state-of-the-art computational methods and software in this field.
ContentEngineers are confronted every day to decision making under limited amount of information and uncertain conditions. When designing new structures and systems, the design codes such as SIA or Euro- codes usually provide a framework that guarantees safety and reliability. However the level of safety is not quantified explicitly, which does not allow the analyst to properly choose between design variants and evaluate a total cost in case of failure. In contrast, the framework of risk analysis allows one to incorporate the uncertainty in decision making.

The first part of the course is a reminder on probability theory that is used as a main tool for reliability and risk analysis. Classical concepts such as random variables and vectors, dependence and correlation are recalled. Basic statistical inference methods used for building a probabilistic model from the available data, e.g. the maximum likelihood method, are presented.

The second part is related to structural reliability analysis, i.e. methods that allow one to compute probabilities of failure of a given system with respect to prescribed criteria. The framework of reliability analysis is first set up. Reliability indices are introduced together with the first order-second moment method (FOSM) and the first order reliability method (FORM). Methods based on Monte Carlo simulation are then reviewed and illustrated through various examples. By-products of reliability analysis such as sensitivity measures and partial safety coefficients are derived and their links to structural design codes is shown. The reliability of structural systems is also introduced as well as the methods used to reassess existing structures based on new information.

The third part of the course addresses risk assessment methods. Techniques for the identification of hazard scenarios and their representation by fault trees and event trees are described. Risk is defined with respect to the concept of expected utility in the framework of decision making. Elements of Bayesian decision making, i.e. pre-, post and pre-post risk assessment methods are presented.

The course also includes a tutorial using the UQLab software dedicated to real world structural reliability analysis.
Lecture notesSlides of the lectures are available online every week. A printed version of the full set of slides is proposed to the students at the beginning of the semester.
LiteratureAng, A. and Tang, W.H, Probability Concepts in Engineering - Emphasis on Applications to Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.

S. Marelli, R. Schöbi, B. Sudret, UQLab user manual - Structural reliability (rare events estimation), Report UQLab-V0.92-107.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic course on probability theory and statistics
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