Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialisation in General Medical Physics
Major in Neuroinformatics
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.

Information for UZH students:
Enrolment to this course unit only possible at ETH. No enrolment to module INI404 at UZH.
Please mind the ETH enrolment deadlines for UZH students: Link
W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
376-1791-00LIntroductory Course in Neuroscience I (University of Zurich) Information
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH as an incoming student.
UZH Module Code: SPV0Y005

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
Link
W2 credits2VUniversity lecturers
AbstractThe course gives an introduction to human and comparative neuroanatomy, molecular, cellular and systems neuroscience.
ObjectiveThe course gives an introduction to the development and anatomical structure of nervous systems. Furthermore, it discusses the basics of cellular neurophysiology and neuropharmacology. Finally, the nervous system is described on a system level.
Content1) Human Neuroanatomy I&II
2) Comparative Neuroanatomy
3) Building a central nervous system I,II
4) Synapses I,II
5) Glia and more
6) Excitability
7) Circuits underlying Emotion
8) Visual System
9) Auditory & Vestibular System
10) Somatosensory and Motor Systems
11) Learning in artificial and biological neural networks
Prerequisites / NoticeFor doctoral students of the Neuroscience Center Zurich (ZNZ).
227-2037-00LPhysical Modelling and SimulationW6 credits4GJ. Smajic
AbstractThis module consists of (a) an introduction to fundamental equations of electromagnetics, mechanics and heat transfer, (b) a detailed overview of numerical methods for field simulations, and (c) practical examples solved in form of small projects.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. Knowledge of the main concepts of numerical methods for physical modelling and simulation. Ability (a) to develop own simple field simulation programs, (b) to select an appropriate field solver for a given problem, (c) to perform field simulations, (d) to evaluate the obtained results, and (e) to interactively improve the models until sufficiently accurate results are obtained.
ContentThe module begins with an introduction to the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. After the introduction follows a detailed overview of the available numerical methods for solving electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical boundary value problems. This part of the course contains a general introduction into numerical methods, differential and integral forms, linear equation systems, Finite Difference Method (FDM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM), Multiple Multipole Program (MMP) and Finite Element Method (FEM). The theoretical part of the course finishes with a presentation of multiphysics simulations through several practical examples of HF-engineering such as coupled electromagnetic-mechanical and electromagnetic-thermal analysis of MEMS.
In the second part of the course the students will work in small groups on practical simulation problems. For solving practical problems the students can develop and use own simulation programs or chose an appropriate commercial field solver for their specific problem. This practical simulation work of the students is supervised by the lecturers.
227-1051-00LSystems Neuroscience (University of Zurich) Information
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH as an incoming student.
UZH Module Code: INI415

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
Link
W6 credits2V + 1UD. Kiper
AbstractThis course focuses on basic aspects of central nervous system physiology, including perception, motor control and cognitive functions.
ObjectiveTo understand the basic concepts underlying perceptual, motor and cognitive functions.
ContentMain emphasis sensory systems, with complements on motor and cognitive functions.
Lecture notesNone
Literature"The senses", ed. H. Barlow and J. Mollon, Cambridge.
"Principles of Neural Science", Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel
Prerequisites / Noticenone
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