Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialisation in General Medical Physics
Major in Bioengineering
Electives
376-1622-00L Practical Methods in Tissue Engineering (offered in the Autumn Semester) and 376-1624-00L Practical Methods in Biofabrication (offered in the Spring Semester) are mutually exclusive to be eligible for credits.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information W4 credits3GB. Nelson
AbstractMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course, the students apply these concepts in assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
ContentMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be made available as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be taught in English.
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the basic vocabulary of biomedical engineering and getting familiar with concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations. It also serves as an introduction to the field for students of the ITET, MAVT, HEST and other bachelor programs.
In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ContentHistory of BME and the role of biomedical engineers. Ethical issues related to BME.
Biomedical sensors both wearable and also biochemical sensors.
Bioelectronics: Nernst equation, Donnan equilibrium, equivalent circuits of biological membranes and bioelectronic devices.
Bioinformatics: genomic and proteomic tools, databases and basic calculations.
Equations describing basic reactions and enzyme kinetics.
Medical optics: Optical components and systems used in hospitals.
Basic concepts of tissue engineering and organ printing.
Biomaterials and their medical applications.
Function of the heart and the circulatory system.
Transport and exchange of substances in the human body, compartment modeling.
The respiratory system.
Bioimaging.
Orthopedic biomechanics.
Lectures (2h), discussion of practical exercises (1h) and homework exercises.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

moodle page of the course
Prerequisites / NoticeNo specific requirements, BUT
ITET, MAVT, PHYS students will have to learn a lot of new words related to biochemistry, biology and medicine, while
HEST and BIOL students will have to grasp basic engineering concepts (circuits, equations, etc.).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingfostered
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
327-1101-00LBiomineralizationW2 credits2VK.‑H. Ernst
AbstractThe course addresses undergraduate and graduate students interested in getting introduced into the basic concepts of biomineralization.
ObjectiveThe course aims to introduce the basic concepts of biomineralization and the underlying principles, such as supersaturation, nucleation and growth of minerals, the interaction of biomolecules with mineral surfaces, and cell biology of inorganic materials creation. An important part of this class is the independent study and the presentation of original literature from the field.
ContentBiomineralization is a multidisciplinary field. Topics dealing with biology, molecular and cell biology, solid state physics, mineralogy, crystallography, organic and physical chemistry, biochemistry, dentistry, oceanography, geology, etc. are addressed. The course covers definition and general concepts of biomineralization (BM)/ types of biominerals and their function / crystal nucleation and growth / biological induction of BM / control of crystal morphology, habit, shape and orientation by organisms / strategies of compartmentalization / the interface between biomolecules (peptides, polysaccharides) and the mineral phase / modern experimental methods for studying BM phenomena / inter-, intra, extra- and epicellular BM / organic templates and matrices for BM / structure of bone, teeth (vertebrates and invertebrates) and mollusk shells / calcification / silification in diatoms, radiolaria and plants / calcium and iron storage / impact of BM on lithosphere and atmosphere/ evolution / taxonomy of organisms.

1. Introduction and overview
2. Biominerals and their functions
3. Chemical control of biomineralization
4. Control of morphology: Organic templates and additives
5. Modern methods of investigation of BM
6. BM in matrices: bone and nacre
7. Vertebrate teeth
8. Invertebrate teeth
9. BM within vesicles: calcite of coccoliths
10. Silica
11. Iron storage and mineralization
Lecture notesScript with more than 600 pages with many illustrations will be distributed free of charge.
Literature1) S. Mann, Biomineralization, Oxford University Press, 2001, Oxford, New York
2) H. Lowenstam, S. Weiner, On Biomineralization, Oxford University Press, 1989, Oxford
3) P. M. Dove, J. J. DeYoreo, S. Weiner (Eds.) Biomineralization, Reviews in Mineralogoy & Geochemistry Vol. 54, 2003
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special requirements are needed for attending. Basic knowledge in chemistry and cell biology is expected.
376-1622-00LPractical Methods in Tissue Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PM. Zenobi-Wong, S. J. Ferguson, S. Grad, S. Schürle-Finke
AbstractThe goal of this course is to teach MSc students the necessary skills for doing research in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
ObjectivePractical exercises on topics including sterile cell culture, light microscopy and histology, and biomaterials are covered. Practical work on manufacturing and evaluating hydrogels and scaffolds for tissue engineering will be performed in small groups. In addition to practical lab work, the course will teach skills in data acquisition/analysis.
Prerequisites / NoticeA Windows laptop (or Windows on Mac) is required for certain of the lab modules.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. Recently, ellipsometry has been introduced to on-line monitor film thickness, and roughness with sub-nanometer precision. These characterisation techniques are vital for optimising the preparation of medical implants.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

X rays are more and more often used to characterise the human tissues down to the nanometer level. The combination of highly intense beams only some micrometers in diameter with scanning enables spatially resolved measurements and the determination of tissue's anisotropies of biopsies.
535-0423-00LDrug Delivery and Drug Targeting Restricted registration - show details W2 credits1.5VJ.‑C. Leroux
AbstractThe students gain an overview on current principles, methodologies and systems for controlled delivery and targeting of drugs. This enables the students to understand and evaluate the field in terms of scientific criteria.
ObjectiveThe students dispose of an overview on current principles and systems for the controlled delivery and targeting of drugs. The focus of the course lies on developing a capacity to understand the involved technologies and methods, as well as an appreciation of the chances and constraints of their therapeutic usage, with prime attention on anticancer drugs, therapeutic peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and vaccines.
ContentThe course covers the following topics: drug targeting and delivery principles, macromolecular drug carriers, liposomes, micelles, micro/nanoparticles, gels and implants, administration of vaccines, targeting at the gastrointestinal level, synthetic carriers for nucleic acid drugs, ophthalmic devices, novel trends in transdermal and nasal drug delivery and 3D printing of drug delivery systems.
Lecture notesSelected lecture notes, documents and supporting material will be directly provided or may be downloaded from the course website.
LiteratureA.M. Hillery, K. Park. Drug Delivery: Fundamentals & Applications, second edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2017.

B. Wang B, L. Hu, T.J. Siahaan. Drug Delivery - Principles and Applications, second edition, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken NJ, 2016.

Further references will be provided in the course.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
227-0393-10LBioelectronics and Biosensors Information W6 credits2V + 2UJ. Vörös, M. F. Yanik
AbstractThe course introduces bioelectricity and the sensing concepts that enable obtaining information about neurons and their networks. The sources of electrical fields and currents in the context of biological systems are discussed. The fundamental concepts and challenges of measuring bioelectronic signals and the basic concepts to record optogenetically modified organisms are introduced.
ObjectiveDuring this course the students will:
- learn the basic concepts in bioelectronics including the sources of bioelectronic signals and the methods to measure them
- be able to solve typical problems in bioelectronics
- learn about the remaining challenges in this field
ContentLecture topics:

1. Introduction

Sources of bioelectronic signals
2. Membrane and Transport
3-4. Action potential and Hodgkin-Huxley

Measuring bioelectronic signals
5. Detection and Noise
6. Measuring currents in solutions, nanopore sensing and patch clamp pipettes
7. Measuring potentials in solution and core conductance model
8. Measuring electronic signals with wearable electronics, ECG, EEG
9. Measuring mechanical signals with bioelectronics

In vivo stimulation and recording
10. Functional electric stimulation
11. In vivo electrophysiology

Optical recording and control of neurons (optogenetics)
12. Measuring neurons optically, fundamentals of optical microscopy
13. Fluorescent probes and scanning microscopy, optogenetics, in vivo microscopy

14. Measuring biochemical signals
Lecture notesA detailed script is provided to each lecture including the exercises and their solutions.
LiteraturePlonsey and Barr, Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach (Third edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires an open attitude to the interdisciplinary approach of bioelectronics.
In addition, it requires undergraduate entry-level familiarity with electric & magnetic fields/forces, resistors, capacitors, electric circuits, differential equations, calculus, probability calculus, Fourier transformation & frequency domain, lenses / light propagation / refractive index, pressure, diffusion AND basic knowledge of biology and chemistry (e.g. understanding the concepts of concentration, valence, reactants-products, etc.).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
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