Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Mechanical Engineering Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2010)
Focus Specialization
Design, Mechanics and Materials
Focus Coordinator: Prof. Kristina Shea
In order to achieve the required 20 credit points for the Focus Specialization Design, Mechanics and Material you are free to choose any of the courses offered within the focus and are encouraged to select among those recommended. If you wish to take one of the Master level courses, you must get approval from the lecturer.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0364-00LLightweight Structures Laboratory Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.
W+4 credits5AM. Zogg, P. Ermanni
AbstractTeams of 2 to 3 students have to design, size, and manufacture a lightweight structre complying with given specifications. An aircraft wing spar prototype as well as later a second improved spar will be tested and assessed regarding to design and to structural mechanical criteria.
ObjectiveTo develop the skills to identify and solve typical problems of the structure mechanics on a real application. Other important aspects are to foster team work and team spirit, to link theoretical knowledge and practice, to gather practical experiences in various fields related to lightweight structures such as design, different CAE-methods and structural testing.
ContentThe task of each team (typically 2-2 students) is the realization of a reduced-scale aircraft wing spar, a typical load-carrying structure, with selected materials. The teams are free to develop and implement their own ideas. In this context, specified requirements include information about loads, interface to the surrounding structures.

The project is structured as described below:
- Concept development
- design of the component including FEM simulation and stability checks
- manufacturing and structural testing of a prototype in the lab
- manufacturing and structural testing of an improved component in the lab
- cost assessment
- Report

The project work is supported by selected teaching units.
Lecture noteshandouts for selected topics are available
151-3207-00LLightweightW+4 credits2V + 2UP. Ermanni, T. Tancogne-Dejean, M. Zogg
AbstractThe elective course Lightweight includes numerical methods for the analysis of the load carrying and failure behavior of lightweight structures, as well as construction methods and design principles for lightweight design.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to convey substantiated background for the understanding and the design and sizing of modern lightweight structures in mechanical engineering, vehicle and airplane design.
ContentLightweight design
Thin-walled beams and structures
Instability behavior of thin walled structures
Reinforced shell structures
Load introduction in lightweight structures
Joining technology
Sandwich design
Lecture notesScript, Handouts, Exercises
151-3213-00LIntegrative Ski Building Workshop Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

To apply, please send the following information to Link by 31.08.2022: Letter of Motivation (one page) , CV, Transcript of Records.
W+4 credits9PK. Shea
AbstractThis course introduces students to engineering design and fabrication by building their own skis or snowboard. Theoretical and applied engineering design skills like CAD, analysis and engineering of mechanical properties, 3D printing, laser cutting and practical handcrafting skills are acquired in the course.
ObjectiveThe objectives of the course are to use the practical ski/board design and building exercise to gain hands-on experience in design, mechanics and materials. A selection of sustainable materials are also used to introduce students to sustainable design. The built skis/board will be mechanically tested in the lab as well as together out in the field on a ski day and evaluated from various perspectives. Students can keep their personal built skis/boards after the course.
ContentThis practical ski/board design and building workshop consists of planning, designing, engineering and building your own alpine ski or snowboard. Students learn and execute all the needed steps in the process, such as engineering design, CAD, material selection, analysis of the mechanical properties of a composite layup, fabrication, routing wood cores, 3D printing of plastic protectors, milling side walls from wood or ABS plastic, laying up the fibers from carbon, glas, basalt or flax, laminating with resins, sanding and finishing, as well as laser engraving and veneer wood inlays.
Lecture notesavailable on Moodle
Prerequisites / NoticeWillingness to engage in the practical building of your ski/board also beyond the course hours in the evening.
151-0509-00LAcoustics in Fluid Media: From Robotics to Additive Manufacturing
Note: The previous course title until HS21 "Microscale Acoustofluidics"
W4 credits3GD. Ahmed
AbstractThe course will provide you with the fundamentals of the new and exciting field of ultrasound-based microrobots to treat various diseases. Furthermore, we will explore how ultrasound can be used in additive manufacturing for tissue constructs and robotics.
ObjectiveThe course is designed to equip students with skills in the design and development of ultrasound-based manipulation devices and microrobots for applications in medicine and additive manufacturing.
ContentLinear and nonlinear acoustics, foundations of fluid and solid mechanics and piezoelectricity, Gorkov potential, numerical modelling, acoustic streaming, applications from ultrasonic microrobotics to surface acoustic wave devices
Lecture notesYes, incl. Chapters from the Tutorial: Microscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
LiteratureMicroscale Acoustofluidics, T. Laurell and A. Lenshof, Ed., Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
Prerequisites / NoticeSolid and fluid continuum mechanics. Notice: The exercise part is a mixture of presentation, lab sessions ( both compulsary) and hand in homework.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
151-0524-00LContinuum Mechanics IW4 credits2V + 1UA. E. Ehret
AbstractThe lecture deals with constitutive models that are relevant for the design and analysis of structures. These include anisotropic linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, plasticity and viscoplasticity. The basic concepts of homogenization and laminate theory are introduced. Theoretical models are complemented by examples of engineering applications and experiments.
ObjectiveBasic theories for solving continuum mechanics problems of engineering applications, with particular focus on constitutive models.
ContentAnisotropic elasticity, Linear elastic and linear viscous material behavior, Viscoelasticity, Micro-macro modelling, Laminate theory, Plasticity, Viscoplasticity, Examples of engineering applications, Comparison with experiments
Lecture notesyes
151-0544-00LMetal Additive Manufacturing - Mechanical Integrity and Numerical AnalysisW4 credits3GE. Hosseini
AbstractAn introduction to Metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM) (e.g. different techniques, the metallurgy of common alloy-systems, existing challenges) will be given. The focus of the lecture will be on the employment of different simulation approaches to address MAM challenges and to enable exploiting the full advantage of MAM for the manufacture of structures with desired property and functionality.
ObjectiveThe main objectives of this lecture are:
- Acknowledging the possibilities and challenges for MAM (with a particular focus on mechanical integrity aspects),
- Understanding the importance of material science and metallurgical considerations in MAM,
- Appreciating the importance of thermal, fluid, mechanical and microstructural simulations for efficient use of MAM technology,
- Using different commercial analysis tools (COMSOL, ANSYS, ABAQUS) for simulation of the MAM process.
Content- Introduction to MAM (concept, application examples, pros & cons),
- Powder-bed and powder-blown metal additive manufacturing,
- Thermo-fluid analysis of additive manufacturing,
- Continuum-based thermal modelling and experimental validation techniques,
- Residual stress and distortion simulation and verification methods,
- Microstructural simulation (basics, analytical, kinetic Monte Carlo, cellular automata, phase-field),
- Mechanical property prediction for MAM,
- Microstructure and mechanical response of MAM material (steels, Ti6Al4V, Inconel, Al alloys),
- Design for additive manufacturing
- Artificial intelligence for AM
Exercise sessions use COMSOL, ANSYS, ABAQUS packages for analysis of MAM process. Detailed video instructions will be provided to enable students to set up their own simulations. COMSOL, ANSYS and ABAQUS agreed to support the course by providing licenses for the course attendees and therefore the students can install the packages on their own systems.
Lecture notesHandouts of the presented slides.
LiteratureNo textbook is available for the course (unfortunately), since it is a dynamic and relatively new topic. In addition to the material presented in the course slides, suggestions/recommendations for additional literature/publications will be given (for each individual topic).
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic knowledge of mechanical analysis, metallurgy, thermodynamics is recommended.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
151-3209-00LEngineering Design Optimization Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits4GK. Shea, T. Stankovic
AbstractThe course covers fundamentals of computational optimization methods in the context of engineering design. It develops skills to formally state and model engineering design tasks as optimization problems and select appropriate methods to solve them.
ObjectiveThe lecture and exercises teach the fundamentals of optimization methods in the context of engineering design. After taking the course students will be able to express engineering design problems as formal optimization problems. Students will also be able to select and apply a suitable optimization method given the nature of the optimization model. They will understand the links between optimization and engineering design in order to design more efficient and performance optimized technical products. The exercises are MATLAB based.
Content1. Optimization modeling and theory 2. Unconstrained optimization methods 2. Constrained optimization methods - linear and non-linear 4. Direct search methods 5. Stochastic and evolutionary search methods 6. Multi-objective optimization
Lecture notesavailable on Moodle
327-1204-00LMaterials at Work IW4 credits4SR. Spolenak, E. Dufresne, R. Koopmans
AbstractThis course attempts to prepare the student for a job as a materials engineer in industry. The gap between fundamental materials science and the materials engineering of products should be bridged. The focus lies on the practical application of fundamental knowledge allowing the students to experience application related materials concepts with a strong emphasis on case-study mediated learning.
ObjectiveTeaching goals:

to learn how materials are selected for a specific application

to understand how materials around us are produced and manufactured

to understand the value chain from raw material to application

to be exposed to state of the art technologies for processing, joining and shaping

to be exposed to industry related materials issues and the corresponding language (terminology) and skills

to create an impression of how a job in industry "works", to improve the perception of the demands of a job in industry
ContentThis course is designed as a two semester class and the topics reflect the contents covered in both semesters.

Lectures and case studies encompass the following topics:

Strategic Materials (where do raw materials come from, who owns them, who owns the IP and can they be substituted)
Materials Selection (what is the optimal material (class) for a specific application)
Materials systems (subdivisions include all classical materials classes)
Processing
Joining (assembly)
Shaping
Materials and process scaling (from nm to m and vice versa, from mg to tons)
Sustainable materials manufacturing (cradle to cradle) Recycling (Energy recovery)

After a general part of materials selection, critical materials and materials and design four parts consisting of polymers, metals, ceramics and coatings will be addressed.

In the fall semester the focus is on the general part, polymers and alloy case studies in metals. The course is accompanied by hands-on analysis projects on everyday materials.
LiteratureManufacturing, Engineering & Technology
Serope Kalpakjian, Steven Schmid
ISBN: 978-0131489653
Prerequisites / NoticeProfound knowledge in Physical Metallurgy and Polymer Basics and Polymer Technology required (These subjects are covered at the Bachelor Level by the following lectures: Metalle 1, 2; Polymere 1,2)
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