Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Biomedical Engineering Master Information
Track Courses
Molecular Bioengineering
Recommended Elective Courses
These courses are particularly recommended for the Molecular Bioengineering track. Please consult your track advisor if you wish to select other subjects.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0604-00LMicrorobotics Information W4 credits3GB. Nelson
AbstractMicrorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that combines aspects of robotics, micro and nanotechnology, biomedical engineering, and materials science. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of this emerging field. Throughout the course, the students apply these concepts in assignments. The course concludes with an end-of-semester examination.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamental aspects of the emerging field of microrobotics. This includes a focus on physical laws that predominate at the microscale, technologies for fabricating small devices, bio-inspired design, and applications of the field.
ContentMain topics of the course include:
- Scaling laws at micro/nano scales
- Electrostatics
- Electromagnetism
- Low Reynolds number flows
- Observation tools
- Materials and fabrication methods
- Applications of biomedical microrobots
Lecture notesThe powerpoint slides presented in the lectures will be made available as pdf files. Several readings will also be made available electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be taught in English.
151-0905-00LMedical Technology Innovation - From Concept to Clinics Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3GI. Herrmann
AbstractProject-oriented learning on how to develop technological solutions to address unmet clinical needs.
ObjectiveAfter completing the course, you will be able to effectively collaborate with medical doctors in order to identify important unmet clinical needs. You will be able to ideate and develop appropriate engineering solutions and implementation strategies for real-world clinical problems. This lecture aims to prepare you for typical engineering challenges in the real-world where - in addition to the development of an elegant solution -interdisciplinary team work and effective communication play a key role.
Lecture noteswill be available on the moodle.
Literaturewill be available on the moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeOn site presence during (most) of the lectures highly encouraged!
Graded innovation project will require on-site presence.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
227-0311-00LQubits, Electrons, PhotonsW6 credits3V + 2UT. Zambelli
AbstractIn-depth analysis of the quantum mechanics origin of nuclear magnetic resonance (qubits, two-level systems), of LASER (quantization of the electromagnetic field, photons), and of electron transfer (from electrochemistry to photosynthesis).
ObjectiveBeside electronics nanodevices, D-ITET is pushing its research in the fields of NMR (MRI), electrochemistry, bioelectronics, nano-optics, and quantum information, which are all rationalized in terms of quantum mechanics.

Starting from the axioms of quantum mechanics, we will derive the fascinating theory describing spin and qubits, electron transitions and transfer, photons and LASER: quantum mechanics is different because it mocks our daily Euclidean intuition!

In this way, students will work out a robust quantum mechanics (theoretical!!!) basis which will help them in their advanced studies of the following masters: EEIT (batteries), Biomedical Engineering (NMR, bioelectronics), Quantum Engineering, Micro- and Nanosystems.

IMPORTANT: "qubits" from the point of view of NMR (and NOT from that of quantum computing!).
Content• Lagrangian and Hamiltonian: Symmetries and Poisson Brackets
• Postulates of QM: Hilbert Spaces and Operators
• Heisenberg’s Matrix Mechanics: Hamiltonian and Time Evolution Operator
• Density Operator
• Spin: Qubits, Bloch Equations, and NMR
• Entanglement
• Symmetries and Corresponding Operators
• Schrödinger's Wave Mechanics: Electrons in a Periodic Potential and Energy Bands
• Harmonic Oscillator: Creation and Annihilation Operators
• Identical Particles: Bosons and Fermions
• Quantization of the Electromagnetic Field: Photons, Absorption and Emission, LASER
• Electron Transfer: Marcus Theory via Born-Oppenheimer, Franck-Condon, Landau-Zener
Lecture notesNo lecture notes because the proposed textbooks together with the provided supplementary material are more than exhaustive!

!!!!! I am using OneNote. All lectures and exercises will be broadcast via ZOOM and correspondingly recorded (link in Moodle) !!!!!
Literature• J.S. Townsend, "A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics", Second Edition, 2012, University Science Books

• M. Le Bellac, "Quantum Physics", 2011, Cambridge University Press

• (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian) L. Susskind, G. Hrabovsky, "Theoretical Minimum: What You Need to Know to Start Doing Physics", 2014, Hachette Book Group USA

Supplementary material will be uploaded in Moodle.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

+ (as rigorous and profound presentation of the mathematical framework) G. Dell'Antonio, "Lectures on the Mathematics of Quantum Mechanics I", 2015, Springer

+ (as account of those formidable years) G. Gamow, "Thirty Years that Shook Physics", 1985, Dover Publications Inc.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course has been intentionally conceived to be self-consistent with respect to QM for those master students not having encountered it in their track yet. Therefore, a presumably large overlapping has to be expected with a (welcome!) QM introduction course like the D-ITET "Physics II".

A solid base of Analysis I & II as well as of Linear Algebra is really helpful.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
227-0385-10LBiomedical ImagingW6 credits5GS. Kozerke, K. P. Prüssmann
AbstractIntroduction to diagnostic medical imaging based on electromagnetic and acoustic fields including X-ray planar and tomographic imaging, radio-tracer based nuclear imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound-based procedures.
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course students are able to:

• Explain the physical and mathematical foundations of diagnostic medical imaging systems
• Characterize system performance based on signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and transfer function
• Design a basic diagnostic imaging system chain including data acquisition and data reconstruction
• Identify advantages and limitations of different imaging methods in relation to medical diagnostic applications
Content• Introduction (intro, overview, history)
• Signal theory and processing (foundations, transforms, filtering, signal-to-noise ratio)
• X-rays (production, tissue interaction, contrast, modular transfer function)
• X-rays (resolution, detection, digital subtraction angiography, Radon transform)
• X-rays (filtered back-projection, spiral computed tomography, image quality, dose)
• Nuclear imaging (radioactive tracer, collimation, point spread function, SPECT/PET)
• Nuclear imaging (detection principles, image reconstruction, kinetic modelling)
• Magnetic Resonance (magnetic moment, spin transitions, excitation, relaxation, detection)
• Magnetic Resonance (plane wave encoding, Fourier reconstruction, pulse sequences)
• Magnetic Resonance (contrast mechanisms, gradient- and spin-echo, applications)
• Ultrasound (mechanical wave generation, propagation in tissue, reflection, transmission)
• Ultrasound (spatial and temporal resolution, phased arrays)
• Ultrasound (Doppler shift, implementations, applications)
• Summary, example exam questions
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts
LiteratureWebb A, Smith N.B. Introduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications; Cambridge University Press 2011
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis, Linear algebra, Physics, Basics of signal theory, Basic skills in Matlab/Python programming
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the basic vocabulary of biomedical engineering and getting familiar with concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations. It also serves as an introduction to the field for students of the ITET, MAVT, HEST and other bachelor programs.
In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ContentHistory of BME and the role of biomedical engineers. Ethical issues related to BME.
Biomedical sensors both wearable and also biochemical sensors.
Bioelectronics: Nernst equation, Donnan equilibrium, equivalent circuits of biological membranes and bioelectronic devices.
Bioinformatics: genomic and proteomic tools, databases and basic calculations.
Equations describing basic reactions and enzyme kinetics.
Medical optics: Optical components and systems used in hospitals.
Basic concepts of tissue engineering and organ printing.
Biomaterials and their medical applications.
Function of the heart and the circulatory system.
Transport and exchange of substances in the human body, compartment modeling.
The respiratory system.
Bioimaging.
Orthopedic biomechanics.
Lectures (2h), discussion of practical exercises (1h) and homework exercises.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

moodle page of the course
Prerequisites / NoticeNo specific requirements, BUT
ITET, MAVT, PHYS students will have to learn a lot of new words related to biochemistry, biology and medicine, while
HEST and BIOL students will have to grasp basic engineering concepts (circuits, equations, etc.).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingfostered
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
227-0393-10LBioelectronics and Biosensors Information W6 credits2V + 2UJ. Vörös, M. F. Yanik
AbstractThe course introduces bioelectricity and the sensing concepts that enable obtaining information about neurons and their networks. The sources of electrical fields and currents in the context of biological systems are discussed. The fundamental concepts and challenges of measuring bioelectronic signals and the basic concepts to record optogenetically modified organisms are introduced.
ObjectiveDuring this course the students will:
- learn the basic concepts in bioelectronics including the sources of bioelectronic signals and the methods to measure them
- be able to solve typical problems in bioelectronics
- learn about the remaining challenges in this field
ContentLecture topics:

1. Introduction

Sources of bioelectronic signals
2. Membrane and Transport
3-4. Action potential and Hodgkin-Huxley

Measuring bioelectronic signals
5. Detection and Noise
6. Measuring currents in solutions, nanopore sensing and patch clamp pipettes
7. Measuring potentials in solution and core conductance model
8. Measuring electronic signals with wearable electronics, ECG, EEG
9. Measuring mechanical signals with bioelectronics

In vivo stimulation and recording
10. Functional electric stimulation
11. In vivo electrophysiology

Optical recording and control of neurons (optogenetics)
12. Measuring neurons optically, fundamentals of optical microscopy
13. Fluorescent probes and scanning microscopy, optogenetics, in vivo microscopy

14. Measuring biochemical signals
Lecture notesA detailed script is provided to each lecture including the exercises and their solutions.
LiteraturePlonsey and Barr, Bioelectricity: A Quantitative Approach (Third edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires an open attitude to the interdisciplinary approach of bioelectronics.
In addition, it requires undergraduate entry-level familiarity with electric & magnetic fields/forces, resistors, capacitors, electric circuits, differential equations, calculus, probability calculus, Fourier transformation & frequency domain, lenses / light propagation / refractive index, pressure, diffusion AND basic knowledge of biology and chemistry (e.g. understanding the concepts of concentration, valence, reactants-products, etc.).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
227-0965-00LMicro and Nano-Tomography of Biological TissuesW4 credits3GM. Stampanoni, F. Marone Welford
AbstractThe lecture introduces the physical and technical know-how of X-ray tomographic microscopy. Several X-ray imaging techniques (absorption-, phase- and darkfield contrast) will be discussed and their use in daily research, in particular biology, is presented. The course discusses the aspects of quantitative evaluation of tomographic data sets like segmentation, morphometry and statistics.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the basic concepts of X-ray tomographic imaging, image analysis and data quantification at the micro and nano scale with particular emphasis on biological applications
ContentSynchrotron-based X-ray micro- and nano-tomography is today a powerful technique for non-destructive, high-resolution investigations of a broad range of materials. The high-brilliance and high-coherence of third generation synchrotron radiation facilities allow quantitative, three-dimensional imaging at the micro and nanometer scale and extend the traditional absorption imaging technique to edge-enhanced and phase-sensitive measurements, which are particularly suited for investigating biological samples.

The lecture includes a general introduction to the principles of tomographic imaging from image formation to image reconstruction. It provides the physical and engineering basics to understand how imaging beamlines at synchrotron facilities work, looks into the recently developed phase contrast methods, and explores the first applications of X-ray nano-tomographic experiments.

The course finally provides the necessary background to understand the quantitative evaluation of tomographic data, from basic image analysis to complex morphometrical computations and 3D visualization, keeping the focus on biomedical applications.
Lecture notesAvailable online
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
227-0981-00LCross-Disciplinary Research and Development in Medicine and Engineering Restricted registration - show details
A maximum of 12 medical degree students and 12 (biomedical) engineering degree students can be admitted, their number should be equal.
W4 credits2V + 2AV. Kurtcuoglu, D. de Julien de Zelicourt, M. Meboldt, M. Schmid Daners, O. Ullrich
AbstractCross-disciplinary collaboration between engineers and medical doctors is indispensable for innovation in health care. This course will bring together engineering students from ETH Zurich and medical students from the University of Zurich to experience the rewards and challenges of such interdisciplinary work in a project based learning environment.
ObjectiveThe main goal of this course is to demonstrate the differences in communication between the fields of medicine and engineering. Since such differences become the most evident during actual collaborative work, the course is based on a current project in physiology research that combines medicine and engineering. For the engineering students, the specific aims of the course are to:

- Acquire a working understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the investigated system;
- Identify the engineering challenges in the project and communicate them to the medical students;
- Develop and implement, together with the medical students, solution strategies for the identified challenges;
- Present the found solutions to a cross-disciplinary audience.
ContentAfter a general introduction to interdisciplinary communication and detailed background on the collaborative project, the engineering students will team up with medical students to find solutions to a biomedical challenge. In the process, they will be supervised both by lecturers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, receiving coaching customized to the project. The course will end with each team presenting their solution to a cross-disciplinary audience.
Lecture notesHandouts and relevant literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeIMPORTANT: Note that a special permission from the lecturers is required to register for this course. Contact the head lecturer to that end.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
327-0505-00LSurfaces, Interfaces and their Applications IW3 credits2V + 1UN. Spencer, M. P. Heuberger, L. Isa
AbstractAfter being introduced to the physical/chemical principles and importance of surfaces and interfaces, the student is introduced to the most important techniques that can be used to characterize surfaces. Later, liquid interfaces are treated, followed by an introduction to the fields of tribology (friction, lubrication, and wear) and corrosion.
ObjectiveTo gain an understanding of the physical and chemical principles, as well as the tools and applications of surface science, and to be able to choose appropriate surface-analytical approaches for solving problems.
ContentIntroduction to Surface Science
Physical Structure of Surfaces
Surface Forces (static and dynamic)
Adsorbates on Surfaces
Surface Thermodynamics and Kinetics
The Solid-Liquid Interface
Electron Spectroscopy
Vibrational Spectroscopy on Surfaces
Scanning Probe Microscopy
Introduction to Tribology
Introduction to Corrosion Science
Lecture notesScript Download:
Link
LiteratureScript Download:
Link
Book: "Surface Analysis--The Principal Techniques", Ed. J.C. Vickerman, Wiley, ISBN 0-471-97292
Prerequisites / NoticeChemistry:
General undergraduate chemistry
including basic chemical kinetics and thermodynamics

Physics:
General undergraduate physics
including basic theory of diffraction and basic knowledge of crystal structures
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
327-1101-00LBiomineralizationW2 credits2VK.‑H. Ernst
AbstractThe course addresses undergraduate and graduate students interested in getting introduced into the basic concepts of biomineralization.
ObjectiveThe course aims to introduce the basic concepts of biomineralization and the underlying principles, such as supersaturation, nucleation and growth of minerals, the interaction of biomolecules with mineral surfaces, and cell biology of inorganic materials creation. An important part of this class is the independent study and the presentation of original literature from the field.
ContentBiomineralization is a multidisciplinary field. Topics dealing with biology, molecular and cell biology, solid state physics, mineralogy, crystallography, organic and physical chemistry, biochemistry, dentistry, oceanography, geology, etc. are addressed. The course covers definition and general concepts of biomineralization (BM)/ types of biominerals and their function / crystal nucleation and growth / biological induction of BM / control of crystal morphology, habit, shape and orientation by organisms / strategies of compartmentalization / the interface between biomolecules (peptides, polysaccharides) and the mineral phase / modern experimental methods for studying BM phenomena / inter-, intra, extra- and epicellular BM / organic templates and matrices for BM / structure of bone, teeth (vertebrates and invertebrates) and mollusk shells / calcification / silification in diatoms, radiolaria and plants / calcium and iron storage / impact of BM on lithosphere and atmosphere/ evolution / taxonomy of organisms.

1. Introduction and overview
2. Biominerals and their functions
3. Chemical control of biomineralization
4. Control of morphology: Organic templates and additives
5. Modern methods of investigation of BM
6. BM in matrices: bone and nacre
7. Vertebrate teeth
8. Invertebrate teeth
9. BM within vesicles: calcite of coccoliths
10. Silica
11. Iron storage and mineralization
Lecture notesScript with more than 600 pages with many illustrations will be distributed free of charge.
Literature1) S. Mann, Biomineralization, Oxford University Press, 2001, Oxford, New York
2) H. Lowenstam, S. Weiner, On Biomineralization, Oxford University Press, 1989, Oxford
3) P. M. Dove, J. J. DeYoreo, S. Weiner (Eds.) Biomineralization, Reviews in Mineralogoy & Geochemistry Vol. 54, 2003
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special requirements are needed for attending. Basic knowledge in chemistry and cell biology is expected.
376-1622-00LPractical Methods in Tissue Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PM. Zenobi-Wong, S. J. Ferguson, S. Grad, S. Schürle-Finke
AbstractThe goal of this course is to teach MSc students the necessary skills for doing research in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
ObjectivePractical exercises on topics including sterile cell culture, light microscopy and histology, and biomaterials are covered. Practical work on manufacturing and evaluating hydrogels and scaffolds for tissue engineering will be performed in small groups. In addition to practical lab work, the course will teach skills in data acquisition/analysis.
Prerequisites / NoticeA Windows laptop (or Windows on Mac) is required for certain of the lab modules.
402-0341-00LMedical Physics IW6 credits2V + 1UP. Manser
AbstractIntroduction to the fundamentals of medical radiation physics. Functional chain due to radiation exposure from the primary physical effect to the radiobiological and medically manifest secondary effects. Dosimetric concepts of radiation protection in medicine. Mode of action of radiation sources used in medicine and its illustration by means of Monte Carlo simulations.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the functional chain from primary physical effects of ionizing radiation to clinical radiation effects. Dealing with dose as a quantitative measure of medical exposure. Getting familiar with methods to generate ionizing radiation in medicine and learn how they are applied for medical purposes. Eventually, the lecture aims to show the students that medical physics is a fascinating and evolving discipline where physics can directly be used for the benefits of patients and the society.
ContentThe lecture is covering the basic principles of ionzing radiation and its physical and biological effects. The physical interactions of photons as well as of charged particles will be reviewed and their consequences for medical applications will be discussed. The concept of Monte Carlo simulation will be introduced in the excercises and will help the student to understand the characteristics of ionizing radiation in simple and complex situations. Fundamentals in dosimetry will be provided in order to understand the physical and biological effects of ionizing radiation. Deterministic as well as stochastic effects will be discussed and fundamental knowledge about radiation protection will be provided. In the second part of the lecture series, we will cover the generation of ionizing radiation. By this means, the x-ray tube, the clinical linear accelarator, and different radioactive sources in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine will be addressed. Applications in radiolgoy, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy will be described with a special focus on the physics underlying these applications.
Lecture notesA script will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeFor students of the MAS in Medical Physics (Specialization A) the performance assessment is offered at the earliest in the second year of the studies.
529-0041-00LModern Mass Spectrometry, Hyphenated Methods, and ChemometricsW6 credits3GR. Zenobi, B. Hattendorf, P. Sinués Martinez-Lozano
AbstractModern mass spectrometry, hyphenated analytical methods, speciation, chemometrics.
ObjectiveComprehensive knowledge about the analytical methods introduced in this course and their practical applications.
ContentHyphenation of separation with identification methods such as GC-MS, LC-MS, GC-IR, LC-IR, LC-NMR etc.; importance of speciation.
Modern mass spectrometry: time-of-flight, orbitrap and ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, ICP-MS. Soft ionization methods, desorption methods, spray methods. Mass spectrometry imaging.
Use of statistical and computer-assisted methods for processing analytical data (chemometrics).
Lecture notesLecture notes will be made available online.
LiteratureInformation about relevant literature will be available in the lecture & in the lecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises are an integral part of the lecture.
Prerequisites:
529-0051-00 "Analytische Chemie I (3. Semester)"
529-0058-00 "Analytische Chemie II (4. Semester)"
(or equivalent)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
529-0240-00LChemical Biology - PeptidesW6 credits3GH. Wennemers
AbstractAn advanced course on the synthesis, properties and function of peptides in chemistry and biology.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the synthesis, properties and function of peptides in chemistry and biology.
ContentAdvanced peptide synthesis, conformational properties, combinatorial chemistry, therapeutic peptides, peptide based materials, peptides in nanotechnology, peptides in asymmetric catalysis.
Lecture notesCitations from the original literature relevant to the individual lectures will be assigned weekly.
LiteratureNorbert Sewald, Hans Dieter Jakubke "Peptides: Chemistry and Biology", 1st edition, Wiley VCH, 2002.
529-0615-01LBiochemical and Polymer Reaction EngineeringW6 credits3GP. Arosio
AbstractPolymerization reactions and processes. Homogeneous and heterogeneous (emulsion) kinetics of free radical polymerization. Post treatment of polymer colloids. Bioprocesses for the production of molecules and therapeutic proteins. Kinetics and design of aggregation processes of macromolecules and proteins.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to learn how to design polymerization reactors and bioreactors to produce polymers and proteins with the specific product qualities that are required by different applications in chemical, pharmaceutical and food industry. This activity includes the post-treatment of polymer latexes, the downstream processing of proteins and the analysis of their colloidal behavior.
ContentWe will cover the fundamental processes and the operation units involved in the production of polymeric materials and proteins. In particular, the following topics are discussed: Overview on the different polymerization processes. Kinetics of free-radical polymerization and use of population balance models. Production of polymers with controlled characteristics in terms of molecular weight distribution. Kinetics and control of emulsion polymerization. Surfactants and colloidal stability. Aggregation kinetics and aggregate structure in conditions of diffusion and reaction limited aggregation. Modeling and design of colloid aggregation processes. Physico-chemical characterization of proteins and description of enzymatic reactions. Operation units in bioprocessing: upstream, reactor design and downstream. Industrial production of therapeutic proteins. Characterization and engineering of protein aggregation. Protein aggregation in biology and in biotechnology as functional materials.
Lecture notesScripts are available on the web page of the Arosio-group: Link
Additional handout of slides will be provided during the lectures.
LiteratureR.J. Hunter, Foundations of Colloid Science, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, 2001
D. Ramkrishna, Population Balances, Academic Press, 2000
H.W. Blanch, D. S. Clark, Biochemical Engineering, CRC Press, 1995
535-0423-00LDrug Delivery and Drug Targeting Restricted registration - show details W2 credits1.5VJ.‑C. Leroux
AbstractThe students gain an overview on current principles, methodologies and systems for controlled delivery and targeting of drugs. This enables the students to understand and evaluate the field in terms of scientific criteria.
ObjectiveThe students dispose of an overview on current principles and systems for the controlled delivery and targeting of drugs. The focus of the course lies on developing a capacity to understand the involved technologies and methods, as well as an appreciation of the chances and constraints of their therapeutic usage, with prime attention on anticancer drugs, therapeutic peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and vaccines.
ContentThe course covers the following topics: drug targeting and delivery principles, macromolecular drug carriers, liposomes, micelles, micro/nanoparticles, gels and implants, administration of vaccines, targeting at the gastrointestinal level, synthetic carriers for nucleic acid drugs, ophthalmic devices, novel trends in transdermal and nasal drug delivery and 3D printing of drug delivery systems.
Lecture notesSelected lecture notes, documents and supporting material will be directly provided or may be downloaded from the course website.
LiteratureA.M. Hillery, K. Park. Drug Delivery: Fundamentals & Applications, second edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2017.

B. Wang B, L. Hu, T.J. Siahaan. Drug Delivery - Principles and Applications, second edition, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken NJ, 2016.

Further references will be provided in the course.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
551-0223-00LImmunology IIIW4 credits2VM. Kopf, S. B. Freigang, S. R. Leibundgut, F. Mair, A. Oxenius, C. Schneider, E. Slack, R. Spörri, L. Tortola
AbstractThis course provides a detailed understanding of
- development of T and B cells
- the dynamics of a immune response during acute and chronic infection
- mechanisms of immunopathology
- modern vaccination strategies
Key experimental results will be shown to help understanding how immunological text book knowledge has evolved.
ObjectiveObtain a detailed understanding of
- the development, activation, and differentiation of different types of T cells and their effectormechanisms during immune responses,
- Recognition of pathogenic microorganisms by the host cells and molecular events thereafter,
- events and signals for maturation of naive B cells to antibody producing plasma cells and memory B cells.
- Optimization of B cell responses by intelligent design of new vaccines
Contento Development and selection of CD4 and CD8 T cells, natural killer T cells (NKT), and regulatory T cells (Treg)
o NK T cells and responses to lipid antigens
o Differentiation, characterization, and function of CD4 T cell subsets such as Th1, Th2, and Th17
o Overview of cytokines and their effector function
o Co-stimulation (signals 1-3)
o Dendritic cells
o Evolution of the "Danger" concept
o Cells expressing Pattern Recognition Receptors and their downstream signals
o T cell function and dysfunction in acute and chronic viral infections
LiteratureDocuments of the lectures are available for download at:
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeImmunology I and II recommended but not compulsory
636-0507-00LSynthetic Biology II Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Students in the MSc Biotechnology (Programme Regulations 2017) may select Synthetic Biology II instead of the Research Project 1.
W8 credits4AS. Panke, Y. Benenson, J. Stelling
Abstract7 months biological design project, during which the students are required to give presentations on advanced topics in synthetic biology (specifically genetic circuit design) and then select their own biological system to design. The system is subsequently modeled, analyzed, and experimentally implemented. Results are presented at an international student competition at the MIT (Cambridge).
ObjectiveThe students are supposed to acquire a deep understanding of the process of biological design including model representation of a biological system, its thorough analysis, and the subsequent experimental implementation of the system and the related problems.
ContentPresentations on advanced synthetic biology topics (eg genetic circuit design, adaptation of systems dynamics, analytical concepts, large scale de novo DNA synthesis), project selection, modeling of selected biological system, design space exploration, sensitivity analysis, conversion into DNA sequence, (DNA synthesis external,) implementation and analysis of design, summary of results in form of scientific presentation and poster, presentation of results at the iGEM international student competition (Link).
Lecture notesHandouts during course
Prerequisites / NoticeThe final presentation of the project is typically at the MIT (Cambridge, US). Other competing schools include regularly Imperial College, Cambridge University, Harvard University, UC Berkeley, Princeton Universtiy, CalTech, etc.

This project takes place between end of Spring Semester and beginning of Autumn Semester. Registration in April.

Please note that the number of ECTS credits and the actual work load are disconnected.
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