Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Physics Master Information
Electives
Electives: Physics and Mathematics
Selection: Neuroinformatics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.

Information for UZH students:
Enrolment to this course unit only possible at ETH. No enrolment to module INI404 at UZH.
Please mind the ETH enrolment deadlines for UZH students: Link
W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
227-1037-00LIntroduction to Neuroinformatics Information W6 credits2V + 1U + 1AV. Mante, M. Cook, B. Grewe, G. Indiveri, D. Kiper, W. von der Behrens
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the functional properties of neurons. Particularly the description of membrane electrical properties (action potentials, channels), neuronal anatomy, synaptic structures, and neuronal networks. Simple models of computation, learning, and behavior will be explained. Some artificial systems (robot, chip) are presented.
ObjectiveUnderstanding computation by neurons and neuronal circuits is one of the great challenges of science. Many different disciplines can contribute their tools and concepts to solving mysteries of neural computation. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce the monocultures of physics, maths, computer science, engineering, biology, psychology, and even philosophy and history, to discover the enchantments and challenges that we all face in taking on this major 21st century problem and how each discipline can contribute to discovering solutions.
ContentThis course considers the structure and function of biological neural networks at different levels. The function of neural networks lies fundamentally in their wiring and in the electro-chemical properties of nerve cell membranes. Thus, the biological structure of the nerve cell needs to be understood if biologically-realistic models are to be constructed. These simpler models are used to estimate the electrical current flow through dendritic cables and explore how a more complex geometry of neurons influences this current flow. The active properties of nerves are studied to understand both sensory transduction and the generation and transmission of nerve impulses along axons. The concept of local neuronal circuits arises in the context of the rules governing the formation of nerve connections and topographic projections within the nervous system. Communication between neurons in the network can be thought of as information flow across synapses, which can be modified by experience. We need an understanding of the action of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, so that the dynamics and logic of synapses can be interpreted. Finally, simple neural architectures of feedforward and recurrent networks are discussed in the context of co-ordination, control, and integration of sensory and motor information.

Connections to computer science and artificial intelligence are discussed, but the main focus of the course is on establishing the biological basis of computations in neurons.
  •  Page  1  of  1