Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Geomatics Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2013)
Major Courses
Major in Planning
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0347-00LLandscape Planning and Environmental Systems Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2VA. Grêt-Regamey
AbstractIn the course, students learn about methods for the identification and measurement of landscape characteristics, as well as measures and policies for landscape planning. Landscape planning is put into the context of environmental systems (soil, water, air, climate, flora and fauna) and discussed with regard to socio-political questions of the future.
ObjectiveThe aims of this course are:
1) To illustrate the concept of landscape planning, the economic relevance of landscape and nature in the context of the environmental systems (soil, water, air, climate, flora and fauna).
2) To show landscape planning as an integral information system for the coordination of different instruments by illustrating the aims, methods, instruments and their functions in landscape planning.
3) To show the importance of ecosystem services.
4) To learn basics about nature and landscape: Analysis and assessment of the complex interactions between landscape elements, effects of current and future land use (ecosystem goods and services, landscape functions).
5) To identify and measure the characteristics of landscape.
6) Learn how to use spatial data in landscape planning.
ContentIn this course, the following topics are discussed:
- Definition of the concept of landscape
- Relevance of landscape planning
- Landscape metrics
- Landscape change
- Methods, instruments and aims of landscape planning (policy)
- Socio-political questions of the future
- Environmental systems, ecological connectivity
- Ecosystem services
- Urban landscape services
- Practice of landscape planning
- Use of GIS in landscape planning
Lecture notesNo script. The documentation, consisting of presentation slides are partly handed out and are provided for download on Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe contents of the course will be illustrated in the associated course 103-0347-01 U (Landscape Planning and Environmental Systems (GIS Exercises)) or in Project LAND within the Experimental and Computer Lab (for Environmental Engineers). A combination of courses is recommended.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
103-0337-00LSite and Project Development Information W3 credits2GA. Gonzalez Martinez, J. Van Wezemael
AbstractThe focus of the lecture Site & Project Development is on larger contiguous areas or sites and their urban, open space and infrastructural development. In this course, students work on a semester exercise in which they "develop" a specific large-scale project from practice and evaluate it economically, strategically and in terms of feasibility.
ObjectiveStudents in this course will pursue the following learning objectives:

- Investigate and understand a given concrete project area and identify, evaluate and articulate the current problems and relevant issues within this area.

- Consolidate their knowledge in the essential topics of site & project development and apply this in a well-founded, argued and creative manner to address the task at hand.

- Organize and structure themselves while acquiring responsibilities in their interdisciplinary project teams. The teams consist of three to five fellow students that must develop innovative, viable and resilient concepts for a real project development in a given area. Their considerations should be presented in written form (project report) and in linguistic-visual form (final presentation). At the end of the course, the students critically reflect on their experiences with the group work process together with the course instructors.

- Acquire methodological knowledge in location & market analysis, 3D visualization of a project as well as in the financial assessment of a large-scale real estate project and use this knowledge to justify their considerations and evaluate their proposal.

- Development and strengthening of their individual position as planners (spatial, urban, transport planners, etc.) in relation to the questions formulated in the proposed project within the field of Site & Development as well as within their own discipline.
ContentThe lecture is divided into several thematic sections analogous to the essential topics of Site & Project Development. The students are accompanied both in the semester exercise and in the individual lectures by a large number of external guest speakers from the praxis-field, which means that the lecture will not only thematically examine the relevant areas of Site & Project Development, but also will offer the students exclusive, practice-oriented insights. The relevant methodological knowledge for the semester exercise is imparted and, due to the proximity to practice, the students gain exclusive insights into possible professional fields of activity. In this lecture, students apply their already acquired and newly learned skills, especially in interdisciplinary teams, and work on an exciting, motivating and relevant question from the practice.

Major topics covered in the lecture include:
- Urban planning
- Location and market analysis
- Real estate development, financing and valuation
- Project development and decision-making from the perspective of investors
- Open space design and landscape architecture
- Sustainable building and sustainability certification
- Mobility, parking issues, travel models
- Cooperative planning and participation processes, mediation
- Gendered planning in project development
- Inner development & urban quality

Parallel to the lecture series, students work in interdisciplinary teams on a real-life task. In the course of the semester exercise, the lecture material is deepened and what has been learned is applied. The students visit the project area at the beginning of the semester as part of an excursion. Specific large-scale projects such as the Gaswerkareal Bern, the Sihl-Manegg Areal Zurich (Greencity) or the Areal Alter Pilatusmarkt (Nidfeld) Lucerne will be dealt with. For the possible development of the given site, visions are developed by the students on the basis of a comprehensive location and market analysis and a utilization concept is developed. In the process, the students are accompanied by experts and regularly discuss their ideas and proposed solutions with their supervisors.
Lecture notes-Handouts of the lectures
-Extracts from relevant scientific articles and theory literature
-Exercise material

Download: Link
LiteratureReferences in the lecture notes
Prerequisites / Noticenone
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
103-0317-00LSpatial Planning and Development
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
O3 credits2GD. Kaufmann, A. Kuitenbrouwer
AbstractThe course deals with important theoretical, material and methodical foundations for action and decision-making of spatial relevance. This course discusses central tasks and possible solutions for current and future challenges of spatial development in Switzerland and Europe.
ObjectiveSpatial development deals with the development, formation and arrangement of our environment. In order to be able to mediate between the different demands, interests and projects of multiple actors, a forward-looking, action-oriented and robust planning is necessary. It is committed - in the sense of a sustainable spatial development - to the economical handling of resources, in particular of the non-replicable resource soil.
The lecture introduces necessary basic knowledge and is based on the following main topics:
– Inward development and challenges of spatial transformation
– Planning approaches and The (political) steering of spatial development
– Interplay of formal and informal processes and processes across different scales of spatial development
– Methods of action-oriented planning in situations of insecurity
– Integrated space and infrastructure development
– Different types of participation in spatial development
By taking up the lecture, the students are able to recognize cross-scale, complex tasks of spatial development and transformation and to use their theoretical, methodical and professional knowledge to clarify them.
Content- Planning approaches and political organization in Switzerland
- Tasks of spatial relevance
- Key figures and ratios
- Drivers of spatial development
- Steering spatial development I: Policy
- Steering spatial development II : Formal and informal instruments
- Organizing spatial development I: Governance
- Organizing spatial development II: 
Processes and organization
- Methods in spatial planning I
- Methods in spatial planning II
- Planning in complex situations
- Participation in spatial development
- Present and future core tasks of spatial development
Lecture notesFurther information and the documents for the lecture can be found on Moodle

Link
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCooperation and Teamworkfostered
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
103-0417-02LMethodology of Planning Research and Practice
Does not take place this semester.
Only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
W3 credits2GA. Peric Momcilovic, T. Hug, R. Streit
AbstractThis course deals with scientific and applied methods and the ways of thinking that are useful in planning practice as well as in scientific research. Students are offered interdisciplinary knowledge from planning practice and research, behavioural economics and social sciences. New perspectives on planning are opened up, which can lead to better results in future projects and research.
ObjectiveKeeping the general aim of exploring the basic methodologies in spatial planning research and practice, the specific course learning objectives are as follows:
- to address complex real-world spatial problems in adequate ways
- to know relevant theories and maxims that are subject to specific methods of problem solving
- to identify key questions and key concepts in contemporary planning research
- to select appropriate research methods to properly address the research questions

In practical terms, students:
- learn to deal with uncertainties and estimate quantities
- improve their ability to take decisions based on incomplete data and information
- are informed about different (qualitative and quantitative) methods and techniques for spatial research
- learn about different types of research (theoretical, empirical, action-oriented, qualitative, quantitative)
- get skilled for writing simple research essays
- are urged to question their own knowledge and challenge the course of action taken in planning processes
ContentThe course is based on the following questions:

How do we deal with complex issues in planning?
- Forms of knowledge, half-knowledge and not knowing
- Occurrence and explanation patterns for irrational behaviour
- Spatial research and planning practice
- Planning maxims
- Mapping complex topics in research questions

How do we generate knowledge about complex issues?
- Methods for scientific data generation
- Applied handling of quantities and probabilities
- Estimating despite uncertainties
- Opportunities of digitisation in planning (Participation, BigData)

How do we react to complex questions in planning?
- Methods of scientific data analysis
- Making decisions despite incomplete information
- Dealing with robustness and fragility

More specifically, the lectures focus on the following topics (NB: Some content units will be presented in English, they are marked with *asterisk below)
- (Half-) knowledge/behaviour/irrationalities
- Initial situation: Solving complex problems
- Forms of knowledge, knowing of not knowing something, not knowing of not knowing something
- Behavioural patterns, occurrence and explanation patterns for irrational behaviour
- Methods for solving complex tasks in planning practice
- Spatial research and planning practice - connections, differences, overlaps
- Challenges in the solution of complex tasks: System delimitation, interdisciplinarity, retrospective vs. prospective approach (descriptive vs. action-oriented, "reflected scenario building")
- Planning maxims
- *Methodology in spatial research
- *Research design
- *Research questions (types of research questions; research questions, hypotheses and theories); justification of research question
- Data generation methods (interviews and questionnaires, ethnography and observation, documents, official statistics)
- Dealing with quantities, estimations, anchor effect
- Importance of scales and key figures in planning
- Estimation methods
- Danger of the anchor effect
- Digitization in planning
- New data sources and sizes
- Opportunities and challenges through digitisation in planning
- Data analysis methods (quantitative and qualitative data; quantitative analysis of survey data; qualitative analysis - content analysis, discourse analysis, case study, comparative research)
- *Research ethics
- Decisions based on incomplete information
- Dealing with complex systems/roughness
- *Role of science in planning - the perspective of both research and practice
Lecture notesLearning materials: available online (Moodle) before corresponding lecture.
LiteratureFarthing, S. (2015). Research Design in Urban Planning: A Student’s Guide. London: Sage.
Schönwandt W., Voermanek K., Utz J., et al. (2013): Solving Complex Problems. A Handbook. Jovis, Berlin
Kahnemann, D. (2013). Thinking, Fast and Slow. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
101-0427-01LPublic Transport Design and OperationsW6 credits4GF. Corman, T.‑H. Yan
AbstractThis course aims at analyzing, designing, improving public transport systems, as part of the overall transport system.
ObjectivePublic transport is a key driver for making our cities more livable, clean and accessible, providing safe, and sustainable travel options for millions of people around the globe. Proper planning of public transport system also ensures that the system is competitive in terms of speed and cost. Public transport is a crucial asset, whose social, economic and environmental benefits extend beyond those who use it regularly; it reduces the amount of cars and road infrastructure in cities; reduces injuries and fatalities associated to car accidents, and gives transport accessibility to very large demographic groups.

Goal of the class is to understand the main characteristics and differences of public transport networks.
Their various performance criteria based on various perspective and stakeholders.
The most relevant decision making problems in a planning tactical and operational point of view
At the end of this course, students can critically analyze existing networks of public transport, their design and use; consider and substantiate possible improvements to existing networks of public transport and the management of those networks; optimize the use of resources in public transport.

General structure:
general introduction of transport, modes, technologies,
system design and line planning for different situations,
mathematical models for design and line planning
timetabling and tactical planning, and related mathematical approaches
operations, and quantitative support to operational problems,
evaluation of public transport systems.
ContentBasics for line transport systems and networks
Passenger/Supply requirements for line operations
Objectives of system and network planning, from different perspectives and users, design dilemmas
Conceptual concepts for passenger transport: long-distance, urban transport, regional, local transport

Planning process, from demand evaluation to line planning to timetables to operations
Matching demand and modes
Line planning techniques
Timetabling principles

Allocation of resources
Management of operations
Measures of realized operations
Improvements of existing services
Lecture notesLecture slides are provided.
LiteratureCeder, Avi: Public Transit Planning and Operation, CRC Press, 2015, ISBN 978-1466563919 (English)

Holzapfel, Helmut: Urbanismus und Verkehr – Bausteine für Architekten, Stadt- und Verkehrsplaner, Vieweg+Teubner, Wiesbaden 2012, ISBN 978-3-8348-1950-5 (Deutsch)

Hull, Angela: Transport Matters – Integrated approaches to planning city-regions, Routledge / Taylor & Francis Group, London / New York 2011, ISBN 978-0-415-48818-4 (English)

Vuchic, Vukan R.: Urban Transit – Operations, Planning, and Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken / New Jersey 2005, ISBN 0-471-63265-1 (English)

Walker, Jarrett: Human Transit – How clearer thinking about public transit can enrich our communities and our lives, ISLAND PRESS, Washington / Covelo / London 2012, ISBN 978-1-59726-971-1 (English)

White, Peter: Public Transport - Its Planning, Management and Operation, 5th edition, Routledge, London / New York 2009, ISBN 978-0415445306 (English)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
101-0417-00LTransport Planning MethodsW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting and also evaluating the solution of given planning problems.
The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and an applied part in which students develop their own models in order to evaluate a transport project/ policy by means of cost-benefit analysis.
Objective- Knowledge and understanding of statistical methods and algorithms commonly used in transport planning
- Comprehend the reasoning and capabilities of transport models
- Ability to independently develop a transport model able to solve / answer planning problem
- Getting familiar with cost-benefit analysis as a decision-making supporting tool
ContentThe course provides the necessary knowledge to develop models supporting the solution of given planning problems and also introduces cost-benefit analysis as a decision-making tool. Examples of such planning problems are the estimation of traffic volumes, prediction of estimated utilization of new public transport lines, and evaluation of effects (e.g. change in emissions of a city) triggered by building new infrastructure and changes to operational regulations.

To cope with that, the problem is divided into sub-problems, which are solved using various statistical models (e.g. regression, discrete choice analysis) and algorithms (e.g. iterative proportional fitting, shortest path algorithms, method of successive averages).

The course is composed of a lecture part, providing the theoretical knowledge, and an applied part in which students develop their own models in order to evaluate a transport project/ policy by means of cost-benefit analysis. Interim lab session take place regularly to guide and support students with the applied part of the course.
Lecture notesMoodle platform (enrollment needed)
LiteratureWillumsen, P. and J. de D. Ortuzar (2003) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.

Cascetta, E. (2001) Transportation Systems Engineering: Theory and Methods, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.

Sheffi, Y. (1985) Urban Transportation Networks: Equilibrium Analysis with Mathematical Programming Methods, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs.

Schnabel, W. and D. Lohse (1997) Verkehrsplanung, 2. edn., vol. 2 of Grundlagen der Strassenverkehrstechnik und der Verkehrsplanung, Verlag für Bauwesen, Berlin.

McCarthy, P.S. (2001) Transportation Economics: A case study approach, Blackwell, Oxford.
103-0347-01LLandscape Planning and Environmental Systems (GIS Exercises) Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2UA. Grêt-Regamey, C. Brouillet, M. Galleguillos Torres, N. Klein
AbstractThe course content of the lecture Landscape Planning and Environmental Systems (103-0347-00 V) will be illustrated in practical GIS exercises (e.g. habitat modelling, land use change, ecosystem services, connectivity).
Objective- Practical application of theory from the lectures
- Quantitative assessment and evaluation of landscape characteristics
- Learning useful applications of GIS for landscape planning
- Developing landscape planning measures for practical case studies
Content- Applications of GIS in landscape planning
- Landscape analysis
- Landscape structural metrics
- Modelling habitats and land use change
- Calculating urban ecosystem services
- Ecological connectivity
Lecture notesA script and presentation slides for each exercise will be provided on Moodle.
LiteratureWill be named in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic GIS skills are strongly recommended.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesfostered
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
103-0569-00LEuropean Aspects of Spatial DevelopmentW3 credits2GA. Peric Momcilovic
AbstractFollowing the insight into historical perspective and contemporary models of governance and planning, the course focuses on the international dimension of spatial planning in Europe. This includes a discussion of how European spatial policy is made and by whom, how planners can participate in such process and how they can address transnational challenges of spatial development cooperatively.
ObjectiveKeeping the general aim of exploring the European dimension of spatial planning in mind, the specific course learning objectives are as follows:
- to interpret the history of spatial planning at the transnational scale
- to understand and explain the content of the European spatial policy agenda
- to describe and analyse the role of territorial cooperation in making European spatial development patterns and planning procedures
- to discuss the changing role of planners and evaluate the ways of their engagement in European spatial policy-making
Content- European spatial policy agenda: introduction and basic directives
- governance models
- planning models; collaborative planning model (main concepts & critics)
- post-positivist approach to spatial planning
- transnational spatial planning in Europe; questioning the European spatial planning; spatial development trends in Europe
- EU as a political system: EU institutions & non-EU actors
- planning families in Europe; the European spatial planning agenda
- spatial planning strategies and programmes on territorial cooperation
- the notion of planning culture and planning system; planning cultures in Europe
- basic characteristics of planning systems in Europe
- the relevance of European transnational cooperation for spatial planning
- European transnational initiatives
Lecture notesThe documents for the lecture will be provided at the moodle.
LiteratureObligatory literature:
- Dühr, S., Colomb, C. & Nadin, V. (2010). European Spatial Planning and Territorial Cooperation. London: Routledge.

Recommended literature:
Governance models:
- Martens, K. (2007). Actors in a Fuzzy Governance Environment. In G. de Roo & G. Porter (Eds.), Fuzzy Planning: The Role of Actors in a Fuzzy Governance Environment (pp. 43-65). Abingdon, Oxon, GBR: Ashgate Publishing Group.

Planning models:
- Davoudi, S. & Strange, I. (2009). Conceptions of Space and Place in Strategic Spatial Planning. Abingdon, Oxon, GBR: Routledge.
- Allmendinger, P. (2002). The Post-Positivist Landscape of Planning Theory. In P. Allmendinger & M. Tewdwr-Jones (Eds.), Planning Futures: New Directions for Planning Theory (pp. 3-17). London: Routledge.
- Healey, P. (1997). Collaborative Planning - Shaping places in fragmented societies. London: MacMillan Press.

EU as a political context:
- Williams, R. H. (1996). European Union Spatial Policy and Planning. London: Sage.

Territorial cooperation in Europe:
- Dühr, S., Stead, D. & Zonneveld, W. (2007). The Europeanization of spatial planning through territorial cooperation. Planning Practice & Research, 22(3), 291-307.
- Dühr, S. & Nadin, V. (2007). Europeanization through transnational territorial cooperation? The case of INTERREG IIIB North-West Europe. Planning Practice and Research, 22(3), 373-394.
- Faludi, A. (Ed.) (2002). European Spatial Planning. Cambridge, Mass.: Lincoln institute of land policy.
- Faludi, A. (2010). Cohesion, Coherence, Cooperation: European Spatial Planning Coming of Age? London: Routledge.
- Faludi, A. (2014). EUropeanisation or Europeanisation of spatial planning? Planning Theory & Practice, 15(2), 155-169.
- Kunzmann, K. R. (2006). The Europeanisation of spatial planning. In N. Adams, J. Alden & N. Harris (Eds.), Regional Development and Spatial Planning in an Enlarged European Union. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Planning families and cultures:
- Newman, P. & Thornley, A. (1996). Urban Plannning in Europe: international competition, national systems and planning projects. London: Routledge.
- Knieling, J. & Othengrafen, F. (Eds.). (2009). Planning Cultures in Europe: Decoding Cultural Phenomena in Urban and Regional Planning. Aldershot: Ashgate.
- Stead, D., de Vries, J. & Tasan-Kok, T. (2015). Planning Cultures and Histories: Influences on the Evolution of Planning Systems and Spatial Development Patterns. European Planning Studies, 23(11), 2127-2132.
- Scholl, B. (Eds.) (2012). Spaces and Places of National Importance. Zurich: ETH vdf Hochschulverlag.

Planning systems in Europe:
- Nadin, V. & Stead, D. (2008). European Spatial Planning Systems, Social Models and Learning. disP - The Planning Review, 44(172), 35-47.
- Commission of the European Communities. (1997). The EU compendium of spatial planning systems and policies. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly for master students, otherwise a special permission by the lecturer is required.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
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