Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Integrated Building Systems Master Information
Science in Perspective
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-ARCH
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
052-0801-00LGlobal History of Urban Design I Information W2 credits2GT. Avermaete
AbstractThis course focuses on the history of the design of cities, as well as on the ideas, processes and actors that engender and lead their development and transformation. The history of urban design will be approached as a cross-cultural field of knowledge that integrates scientific, economic and technical innovation as well as social and cultural advances.
ObjectiveThe lectures deal mainly with the definition of urban design as an independent discipline, which maintains connections with other disciplines (politics, sociology, geography) that are concerned with the transformation of the city. The aim is to make students conversant with the multiple theories, concepts and approaches of urban design as they were articulated throughout time in a variety of cultural contexts, thus offering a theoretical framework for students' future design work.
ContentIn the first semester the genesis of the objects of study, the city, urban culture and urban design, are introduced and situated within their intellectual, cultural and political contexts:

01. The History and Theory of the City as Project
02. Of Rituals, Water and Mud: The Urban Revolution in Mesopotamia and the Indus
03: The Idea of the Polis: Rome, Greece and Beyond
04: The Long Middle Ages and their Counterparts: From the Towns of Tuscany to Delhi
05: Between Ideal and Laboratory: Of Middle Eastern Grids and European Renaissance Principles
06: Of Absolutism and Enlightenment: Baroque, Defense and Colonization
07: The City of Labor: Company Towns as Cross-Cultural Phenomenon
09: Garden Cities of Tomorrow: From the Global North to the Global South and Back Again
010: Civilized Wilderness and City Beautiful: The Park Movement of Olmsted and The Urban Plans of Burnham
011: The Extension of the European City: From the Viennese Ringstrasse to Amsterdam Zuid
Lecture notesPrior to each lecture a chapter of the reader (Skript) will be made available through the webpage of the Chair. These chapters will provide an introduction to the lecture, the basic visual references of each lecture, key dates and events, as well as references to the compulsory and additional reading.
LiteratureThere are three books that will function as main reference literature throughout the course:

-Ching, Francis D. K, Mark Jarzombek, and Vikramditya Prakash. A Global History of Architecture. Hoboken: Wiley, 2017.
-Ingersoll, Richard. World Architecture: A Cross-Cultural History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018.
-James-Chakraborty, Kathleen. Architecture Since 1400. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

These books will be reserved for consultation in the ETH Baubibliothek, and will not be available for individual loans.

A list of further recommended literature will be found within each chapter of the reader (Skript).
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are required to familiarize themselves with the conventions of architectural drawing (reading and analyzing plans at various scales).
851-0609-06LGoverning the Energy Transition Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Primarily suited for Master and PhD level.
W2 credits2VT. Schmidt
AbstractThis course addresses the role of policy and its underlying politics in the transformation of the energy sector. It covers historical, socio-economic, and political perspectives and applies various theoretical concepts to understand specific aspects of the governance of the energy transition.
Objective- To gain an overview of the history of the transition of large technical systems
- To recognize current challenges in the energy system to understand the theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying transitions
- To gain knowledge on the role of policy and politics in energy transitions
ContentClimate change, access to energy and other societal challenges are directly linked to the way we use and create energy. Both the 2015 United Nations Paris climate change agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals make a fast and extensive transition of the energy system necessary.
This lecture introduces the social and environmental challenges involved in the energy sector and discusses the implications of these challenges for the rate and direction of technical change in the energy sector. It compares the current situation with historical socio-technical transitions and derives the consequences for policy-making. It introduces theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying innovation and transitions. It then focuses on the role of policy and policy change in governing the energy transition, considering the role of political actors, institutions and policy feedback.
The grade will be determined by a final exam.
Lecture notesSlides and reading material will be made available via moodle.ethz.ch (only for registered students).
LiteratureA reading list will be provided via moodle.ethz.ch at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is particularly suited for students of the following programmes: MA Comparative International Studies; MSc Energy Science & Technology; MSc Environmental Sciences; MSc Management, Technology & Economics; MSc Science, Technology & Policy; ETH & UZH PhD programmes.
351-0555-00LOpen- and User Innovation
Not for students belonging to D-MTEC!
W3 credits2GS. Häfliger, S. Spaeth
AbstractThe course introduces the students to the long-standing tradition of actively involving users of technology and other knowledge-intensive products in the development and production process, and through own cases they develop an entrepreneurial understanding of product development under distributed, user-centered, or open innovation strategies.
ObjectiveThe course includes both lectures and exercises alternately. The goal is to understand the opportunity of user innovation for management and develop strategies to harness the value of user-developed ideas and contributions for firms and other organizations.

The students actively participate in discussions during the lectures and contribute presentations of case studies during the exercises. The combination should allow to compare theory with practical cases from various industries.

The course presents and builds upon recent research and challenges the students to devise innovation strategies that take into account the availability of user expertise, free and public knowledge, and the interaction with communities that span beyond one organization.

Performance assessment will be: a written group essay based on the open/user innovation case that participants will research and present during the block seminar (including the slides). Each group will have to hand in a 15-20 page essay, details on the required format and the content will be distributed during the course. Active lass participation is required.
ContentThis course on user innovation extends courses on knowledge management and innovation as well as marketing. The students are introduced to the long-standing tradition of actively involving users of technology and other knowledge-intensive products in the development and production process, and through own cases they develop an entrepreneurial understanding of product development under distributed, user-centered, or open innovation strategies. Theoretical underpinnings taught in the course include models of innovation, the structuration of technology, and an introduction to entrepreneurship.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lectures are made available and updated continuously through the SMI website:
LiteratureRelevant literature for the course includes slides and reading
assignments. Papers will be made available through a corresponding
Moodle group.
860-0023-00LInternational Environmental Politics
Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-USYS
W3 credits2VT. Bernauer
AbstractThis course focuses on the conditions under which problem solving efforts in international environmental politics emerge and evolve, and the conditions under which such efforts and the respective public policies are effective.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to (1) gain an overview of relevant questions in the area of international environmental politics from a social sciences viewpoint; (2) learn how to identify interesting/innovative questions concerning this policy area and how to answer them in a methodologically sophisticated way; (3) gain an overview of important global and regional environmental problems and how they are or could be solved.
ContentThis course deals with how and why international problem solving efforts (cooperation) in environmental politics emerge and evolve, and under what circumstances such efforts are effective. Based on concepts and theories of political economy, political science, and public policy, various examples of international environmental politics are discussed, for example the management of international water resources, political responses to global warming, the protection of the stratospheric ozone layer, the reduction of long-range transboundary air pollution, protection of biodiversity, how to deal with plastic waste, and the prevention of pollution of the oceans.

The course is open to all ETH students and visiting students from other universities. Participation does not require previous coursework in the social sciences.

After passing an end-of-semester test (requirement: grade 4.0 or higher) students will receive 3 ECTS credit points. The workload is around 90 hours (meetings, reading assignments, preparation of test).

Visiting students (e.g., from the University of Zurich, exchange students) are subject to the same conditions. Registration of visiting students in the web-based system of ETH is compulsory.

This course will take place on campus (ETH Main Building, HF F.3).
There will be no live-streaming, and the course is NOT in hybrid (on-campus plus online) format. However, the lecture will be recorded and the recordings will be made available via the Moodle platform for this course 1-2 days after the respective lecture for students who are unable to attend in person.
Lecture notesReading materials and slides will be available via Moodle.
LiteratureReading materials and slides will be available via Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course will take place on campus (ETH Main Building, HF F.3).
There will be no live-streaming, and the course is NOT in hybrid (on-campus plus online) format. However, the lecture will be recorded and the recordings will be made available via the Moodle platform for this course 1-2 days after the respective lecture for students who are unable to attend in person.
851-0101-74LSustainable Development - Bridging Art and Science Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2GS. Patel, J. Neve
AbstractIn this course students deepen their knowledge about global development and sustainability issues. We will show five movies each of them linked to one of the five P`s (Planet, People, Prosperity, Peace and Partnerships) reflecting the topics of the 2030 Agenda. Afterwards the movie will be critically discussed with researchers and relevant stakeholders from the broader society.
Objective• Students get a broad understanding of some of the most important issues and discussions related to sustainable development.
• Students get exposed to diverse realities of young people in developing countries
• Students can critically reflect upon the information that is presented to them in the movies and relate it to the broader discussions around sustainable development.
• Students reflect on issues concerning communicating research and the realities of low-income settings to a wider public.
ContentThe aim of the course is to deepen student`s knowledge about global issues and to inspire them to reflect critically upon complex topics, which are related to the broader discourse on sustainable development. In each class, we show a documentary film, which is linked to one of the five critical areas of the 2030 Agenda (Planet, People, Prosperity, Peace and Partnerships), putting specific focus on realties in developing countries. Following the movie screenings, we will discuss the topic of the film in the light of sustainable development with an expert from academia and/or a practitioner from the field of development cooperation. In preparation for each class, the students read an academic paper, which will also be considered in the discussion. The idea of “Bridging Art and Science” is to expose an interdisciplinary group of students to artistic and scientific perspectives alike and to challenge them to deal with bias and polarization, and the role that the media and films play in that regard. The participants of the course will be given the chance to embrace the complexity of sustainable global development.
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 35.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-INFK, D-ITET
W3 credits2SH. Zhao, S. Credé, C. Hölscher
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students form work groups that first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
363-0311-00LPsychological Aspects of Risk Management and Technology Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 65.
W3 credits2VG. Grote, N. Bienefeld-Seall, R. Schneider, M. Zumbühl
AbstractUsing uncertainty management by organizations and individuals as conceptual framework, risk management and risk implications of new technologies are treated. Three components of risk management (risk identification/evaluation, risk mitigation, risk communication) and underlying psychological and organizational processes are discussed, using company case studies to promote in-depth understanding.
Objective- You know how risk and risk management is defined and applied in different industries
- You know the challenges of decision making under risk and uncertainty and its effects on organisations
- Know about and (partially) apply some risk management tools
- Gain some more in-depth knowledge in a selected field within risk management through the semester project (e.g. transport systems, IT, insurance)

This course consists of three main elements:

A) Attendance of lectures that provide the theoretical foundations of “Psychological Aspects of Risk Management and Technology” together with reading assignments for each lecture.

B) Attendance of guest lectures that provide a rich source of practical insights and enable the transfer of theory into practice by discussing real-life cases with experts from various industries.

C) Furthermore, this course enables you to apply what you have learned in the classroom into practice by participating in a group assignment in which you gain insights into various risk industries (e.g., aviation, healthcare, insurance) and topics (e.g., risks in cyber-attacks, mountaineering, autonomous vehicles). These projects help students understand key aspects through in-depth application of the course material on real-life topics. Each group project will be mentored and graded by one of the lecturers (70% of course grade). To round off the course at the end of the year, you will have the opportunity to present your group’s findings to the lecturers and to your peers (30% of course grade).
ContentThe course is organized into fourteen sessions. Sessions comprise a mixture of (guest) lectures, case discussions, and presentations. Through class discussion we will further deepen understanding of the topics and themes of the class. For each session you are required to prepare by reading the assigned literature or case material provided on the Moodle e-learning platform. Topics covered include:

- Elements of risk management:
o Risk identification and evaluation
o Risk mitigation
o Risk communication

- Psychological and organizational concepts relevant in risk management
o Decision-making under uncertainty
o Risk perception
o Resilient organizational processes for managing uncertainty

- Case studies on different elements of risk management (e.g., rule-making, training, managing project risks, automation)

- Group projects related to company case studies
Lecture notesThere is no script, but slides will be made available before the lectures.
LiteratureThere are texts for each of the course topics made available before the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is restricted to 40 participants who will work closely with the lecturers on case studies prepared by the lecturers on topics relevant in their own companies (SWICA, SWISS, University Hospital Zurich).
851-0742-00LContract Design I Restricted registration - show details
This course is taught by Professor Alexander Stremitzer (Link). Using practical examples, you will learn the connections between economic contract theory, contract law, and contract drafting. Further, you will apply this knowledge to practical cases to analyze contracts, recognize contractual problems, and develop suitable solutions.

It is NOT a legal drafting class focused on contractual language.

You can find all course materials and the most recent announcements on Moodle. Please log in to Moodle using your ETH or UZH credentials. Then search for "Contract Design I (851-0742-00L; Fall 2022)" and enroll. The password is "ContractDesign01".

Number of participants limited to 160.
Max 80 ETHZ and 80 UZH Students
W3 credits2VA. Stremitzer
AbstractContract Design I aims to bridge the gap between economic contract theory, contract law, and the writing of real-world contracts. In this course, we take a systematic approach to contract design. This means we first analyze the economic environment in which a transaction takes place, and then engineer contracts that achieve the desired outcome.
ObjectiveContracts are agreements between parties to engage in transactions. A good contract creates value by giving parties the right incentives to meet their objectives. A good contract designer scrutinizes the economic situation in which parties find themselves and tailors the contract to the challenges at hand. To help you become sophisticated contract designers, we draw from insights for which more than half a dozen Nobel Prizes were awarded in the past two decades and transfer them to the art of writing real-world contracts. In other words, Integrative Course Contract Design will provide you with analytical tools related to contracting that are invaluable to successful lawyers, business leaders, and startup founders.

We will cover topics such as moral hazard, adverse selection, elicitation mechanisms, relationship-specific investments, and relational contracting and apply the theoretical insights to real-life case studies ranging from purchases & sales of assets, oil & gas exploration, movie production & distribution, construction & development, M&A deals, to executive compensation and many other types of transactions.

The course will be held in a flipped class-room model: This means that you will watch learning videos specifically produced for this course ahead of the lecture and we will use the class time to discuss real-world case studies.

ETH students: Your grade will consist of two parts:
1) You are required to take weekly computer-based quizzes during class time. Thus, it is imperative that you attend the lectures to be able to finish the quizzes and pass this course.
2) You have to compose short responses to take-home questions on the case studies we discussed in class and upload them.

Note that UZH and HSG students enrolling in this course earn more ECTS on completing this course than ETH students. This is because UZH and HSG students must hand in an extensive group project in addition to the weekly quizzes and take-home questions.
Lecture notesHandouts, prerecorded videos, slides, and other materials
Prerequisites / NoticeAttendance is mandatory. You are only allowed to miss two lectures absent special reasons.

Contract Design I is available to ETH students through the Science in Perspective (SiP) Program of D-GESS. This course is particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BAUG, D-CHAB, DMATH, D-MTEC, D-INFK, and D-MAVT. If you have any questions regarding the course, please write an email to the teaching assistants, Lucas Gericke (Link) or Serge von Steiger (Link).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
851-0252-15LNetwork Analysis
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-MATH
W3 credits2VU. Brandes
AbstractNetwork science is a distinct domain of data science that is characterized by a specific kind of data being studied.
While areas of application range from archaeology to zoology, we concern ourselves with social networks for the most part.
Emphasis is placed on descriptive and analytic approaches rather than theorizing, modeling, or data collection.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to identify and categorize research problems
that call for network approaches while appreciating differences across application domains and contexts.
They will master a suite of mathematical and computational tools,
and know how to design or adapt suitable methods for analysis.
In particular, they will be able to evaluate such methods in terms of appropriateness and efficiency.
ContentThe following topics will be covered with an emphasis on structural and computational approaches and frequent reference to their suitability with respect to substantive theory:

* Empirical Research and Network Data
* Macro and Micro Structure
* Centrality
* Roles
* Cohesion
Lecture notesLecture notes are distributed via the associated course moodle.
Literature* Hennig, Brandes, Pfeffer & Mergel (2012). Studying Social Networks. Campus-Verlag.
* Borgatti, Everett & Johnson (2013). Analyzing Social Networks. Sage.
* Robins (2015). Doing Social Network Research. Sage.
* Brandes & Erlebach (2005). Network Analysis. Springer LNCS 3418.
* Wasserman & Faust (1994). Social Network Analysis. Cambridge University Press.
* Kadushin (2012). Understanding Social Networks. Oxford University Press.
851-0101-86LComplex Social Systems: Modeling Agents, Learning, and Games Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 100.

Prerequisites: Basic programming skills, elementary probability and statistics.
W3 credits2SN. Antulov-Fantulin, D. Carpentras, D. Helbing
AbstractThis course introduces mathematical and computational models to study techno-socio-economic systems and the process of scientific research. Students develop a significant project to tackle techno-socio-economic challenges in application domains of complex systems. They are expected to implement a model and communicating their results through a seminar thesis and a short oral presentation.
ObjectiveThe students are expected to know a programming language and environment (Python, Java or Matlab) as a tool to solve various scientific problems. The use of a high-level programming environment makes it possible to quickly find numerical solutions to a wide range of scientific problems. Students will learn to take advantage of a rich set of tools to present their results numerically and graphically.

The students should be able to implement simulation models and document their skills through a seminar thesis and finally give a short oral presentation.
ContentStudents are expected to implement themselves models of various social processes and systems, including agent-based models, complex networks models, decision making, group dynamics, human crowds, or game-theoretical models.

Part of this course will consist of supervised programming exercises. Credit points are finally earned for the implementation of a mathematical or empirical model from the complexity science literature and the documentation in a seminar thesis.
Lecture notesThe lecture slides will be presented on the course web page after each lecture.
LiteratureAgent-Based Modeling
Link

Social Self-Organization
Link

Traffic and related self-driven many-particle systems
Reviews of Modern Physics 73, 1067
Link

An Analytical Theory of Traffic Flow (collection of papers)
Link

Pedestrian, Crowd, and Evacuation Dynamics
Link

The hidden geometry of complex, network-driven contagion phenomena (relevant for modeling pandemic spread)
Link

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe number of participants is limited to the size of the available computer teaching room. The source code related to the seminar thesis should be well enough documented.

Substantial programming skills and knowledge of statistical methods are expected.

We recommend this course for students in the 4th semester or above.

Students need to present a new subject, for which they have not earned any credit points before.

Good scientific practices, in particular citation and quotation rules, must be properly complied with.

Chatham House rules apply to this course. Materials may not be shared without previous written permission.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
851-0467-00LFrom Traffic Modeling to Smart Cities and Digital Democracies Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.
W3 credits2SD. Helbing, S. Mahajan
AbstractThis seminar will present speakers who discuss the challenges and opportunities arisinig for our cities and societies with the digital revolution. Besides discussing questions of automation using Big Data, AI and other digital technologies, we will reflect on the question of how democracy could be digitally upgraded to promote innovation, sustainability, and resilience.
ObjectiveTo collect credit points, students will have to give a 30-40 minute presentation in the seminar, after which the presentation will be
discussed. The presentation will be graded.
ContentThis seminar will present speakers who discuss the challenges and opportunities arisinig for our cities and societies with the digital revolution. Besides discussing questions of automation using Big Data, AI and other digital technologies, we will also reflect on the question of how democracy could be digitally upgraded, and how citizen participation could contribute to innovation, sustainability, resilience, and quality of life. This includes questions around collective intelligence and digital platforms that support creativity, engagement, coordination and cooperation.
LiteratureMartin Treiber and Arne Kesting
Traffic Flow Dynamics: Data, Models and Simulation
Link

Dirk Helbing
Traffic and related self-driven many-particle systems
Reviews of Modern Physics 73, 1067
Link

Dirk Helbing
An Analytical Theory of Traffic Flow (collection of papers)
Link

Michael Batty, Kay Axhausen et al.
Smart cities of the future

Books by Michael Batty
Link

How social influence can undermine the wisdom of crowd effect
Link

Evidence for a collective intelligence factor in the performance of human groups
Link

Optimal incentives for collective intelligence
Link

Collective Intelligence: Creating a Prosperous World at Peace
Link

Big Mind: How Collective Intelligence Can Change Our World
Link

Programming Collective Intelligence
Link

Urban architecture as connective-collective intelligence. Which spaces of interaction?
Link

Build digital democracy
Link

How to make democracy work in the digital age
Link

Digital Democracy: How to make it work?
Link

Proof of witness presence: Blockchain consensus for augmented democracy in smart cities
Link

Iterative Learning Control for Multi-agent Systems Coordination
Link

Decentralized Collective Learning for Self-managed Sharing Economies
Link

Further literature will be recommended in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents need to present a new subject, for which they have not earned any credit points before.

Good scientific practices, in particular citation and quotation rules, must be properly complied with.

Chatham House rules apply to this course. Materials may not be shared without previous written permission.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
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