Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2022

Computer Science Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2020)
Minors
Minor in Information Security
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-0408-00LCryptographic Protocols Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AM. Hirt
AbstractThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
ObjectiveIndroduction to a very active research area with many gems and paradoxical
results. Spark interest in fundamental problems.
ContentThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
Lecture notesWe provide short lecture notes and handouts of the slides.
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic understanding of fundamental cryptographic concepts
(as taught for example in the course Information Security or
in the course Cryptography Foundations) is useful, but not required.
263-2925-00LProgram Analysis for System Security and Reliability Information W7 credits2V + 1U + 3AM. Vechev
AbstractSecurity issues in modern systems (blockchains, datacenters, deep learning, etc.) result in billions of losses due to hacks and system downtime. This course introduces fundamental techniques (ranging over automated analysis, machine learning, synthesis, zero-knowledge, differential privacy, and their combinations) that can be applied in practice so to build more secure and reliable modern systems.
Objective* Understand the fundamental techniques used to create modern security and reliability analysis engines that are used worldwide.

* Understand how symbolic techniques are combined with machine learning (e.g., deep learning, reinforcement learning) so to create new kinds of learning-based analyzers.

* Understand how to quantify and fix security and reliability issues in modern deep learning models.

* Understand open research questions from both theoretical and practical perspectives.
ContentPlease see: Link for detailed course content.
263-4600-00LFormal Methods for Information Security Information W5 credits2V + 1U + 1AS. Krstic, R. Sasse, C. Sprenger
AbstractThe course focuses on formal methods for the modeling and analysis of security protocols for critical systems, ranging from authentication protocols for network security to electronic voting protocols and online banking. In addition, we will also introduce the notions of non-interference and runtime monitoring.
ObjectiveThe students will learn the key ideas and theoretical foundations of formal modeling and analysis of security protocols. The students will complement their theoretical knowledge by solving practical exercises, completing a small project, and using state-of-the-art tools. The students also learn the fundamentals of non-interference and runtime monitoring.
ContentThe course treats formal methods mainly for the modeling and analysis of security protocols. Cryptographic protocols (such as SSL/TLS, SSH, Kerberos, SAML single-sign on, and IPSec) form the basis for secure communication and business processes. Numerous attacks on published protocols show that the design of cryptographic protocols is extremely error-prone. A rigorous analysis of these protocols is therefore indispensable, and manual analysis is insufficient. The lectures cover the theoretical basis for the (tool-supported) formal modeling and analysis of such protocols. Specifically, we discuss their operational semantics, the formalization of security properties, and techniques and algorithms for their verification.

The second part of this course will cover a selection of advanced topics in security protocols such as abstraction techniques for efficient verification, secure communication with humans, the link between symbolic protocol models and cryptographic models as well as RFID protocols (a staple of the Internet of Things) and electronic voting protocols, including the relevant privacy properties.

Moreover, we will give an introduction to two additional topics: non-interference as a general notion of secure systems, both from a semantic and a programming language perspective (type system), and runtime verification/monitoring to detect violations of security policies expressed as trace properties.
263-4656-00LDigital Signatures Information W5 credits2V + 2AD. Hofheinz
AbstractDigital signatures as one central cryptographic building block. Different security goals and security definitions for digital signatures, followed by a variety of popular and fundamental signature schemes with their security analyses.
ObjectiveThe student knows a variety of techniques to construct and analyze the security of digital signature schemes. This includes modularity as a central tool of constructing secure schemes, and reductions as a central tool to proving the security of schemes.
ContentWe will start with several definitions of security for signature schemes, and investigate the relations among them. We will proceed to generic (but inefficient) constructions of secure signatures, and then move on to a number of efficient schemes based on concrete computational hardness assumptions. On the way, we will get to know paradigms such as hash-then-sign, one-time signatures, and chameleon hashing as central tools to construct secure signatures.
LiteratureJonathan Katz, "Digital Signatures."
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have taken the D-INFK Bachelors course "Information Security" or an equivalent course at Bachelors level.
263-4660-00LApplied Cryptography Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 150.
W8 credits3V + 2U + 2PK. Paterson
AbstractThis course will introduce the basic primitives of cryptography, using rigorous syntax and game-based security definitions. The course will show how these primitives can be combined to build cryptographic protocols and systems.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to put students' understanding of cryptography on sound foundations, to enable them to start to build well-designed cryptographic systems, and to expose them to some of the pitfalls that arise when doing so.
ContentBasic symmetric primitives (block ciphers, modes, hash functions); generic composition; AEAD; basic secure channels; basic public key primitives (encryption,signature, DH key exchange); ECC; randomness; applications.
LiteratureTextbook: Boneh and Shoup, “A Graduate Course in Applied Cryptography”, Link.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should have taken the D-INFK Bachelor's course “Information Security" (252-0211-00) or an alternative first course covering cryptography at a similar level. / In this course, we will use Moodle for content delivery: Link.
  •  Page  1  of  1