Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2022

Civil Engineering Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2020)
Major Courses
Major in Construction and Maintenance Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0579-00LInfrastructure Management 2: Evaluation ToolsW+6 credits2GS. Moghtadernejad
AbstractThis course provides tools to predict the service being provided by infrastructure in situations where the infrastructure is expected to

1) to evolve slowly with relatively little uncertainty over time, e.g. due to the corrosion of a metal bridge, and

2) to change suddenly with relatively large uncertainty, e.g. due to being washed away from an extreme flood.
ObjectiveThe course learning objective is to equip students with tools to be used to the service being provided from infrastructure.
The course increases a student's ability to analyse complex problems and propose solutions and to use state-of-the-art methods of analysis to assess complex problems
ContentReliability
Availability and maintainability
Regression analysis
Event trees
Fault trees
Markov chains
Neural networks
Bayesian networks
Lecture notesAll necessary materials (e.g. transparencies and hand-outs) will be distributed before class.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material will be assigned when necessary.
Prerequisites / NoticeAlthough not an official prerequisite, it is perferred that students have taken the IM1:Process course first. Understanding of the infrastructure management process enables a better understanding of where and how the tools introduced in this course can be used in the management of infrastructure.
101-0588-01LRe-/Source the Built EnvironmentW+3 credits2SG. Habert
AbstractThe course focuses on material choice and energy strategies to limit the environmental impact of construction sector. During the course, specific topics will be presented (construction technologies, environmental policies, social consequences of material use, etc.). The course aims to present sustainable options to tackle the global challenge we are facing and show that "it is not too late".
ObjectiveAfter the lecture series, the students are aware of the main challenges for the production and use of building materials.

They know the different technologies/propositions available, and environmental consequence of a choice.

They understand in which conditions/context one resource/technology will be more appropriate than another
ContentA general presentation of the global context allows to identify the objectives that as engineer, material scientist or architect needs to achieve to create a sustainable built environment.

The course is then conducted as a serie of guest lectures focusing on one specific aspect to tackle this global challenge and show that "it is not too late".

The lecture series is divided as follows:
- General presentation
- Notion of resource depletion, resilience, criticality, decoupling, etc.
- Guest lectures covering different resources and proposing different option to build or maintain a sustainable built environment.
Lecture notesFor each lecture slides will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture series will be conducted in English and is aimed at students of master's programs, particularly the departments ARCH, BAUG, ITET, MAVT, MTEC and USYS.

No lecture will be given during Seminar week.
101-0517-01LProject Management: Pre-Tender to Contract ExecutionW+4 credits2GJ. J. Hoffman
AbstractThis course (PM 2)will provide a comprehensive overview and understanding of the techniques, processes, tools and terminology to manage the Project Triangle (time, cost, quality) and to organize, analyze, control and report a complex project from Pre-Tender stage to Contract signature. This course is part 2 of a 3 part course, see notice below.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course students will have the understanding of the Project Management duties and responsibilities from the Pre-Tender stage of a project to Contract Execution.

The project teams will prepare a project tender proposal base on a request for quotation on a construction project.
Content- Project scope definition and project organization
- Technical specification proposals
- Work Breakdown Structure
- Estimating
- Schedule development
- Interface management
- Resource and cost integration
- Risk and opportunity identification and quantification
- Contract review and analysis
- Project life cycle
- Contract Execution - Project Manager Check List
Lecture notesThe slides will either be distributed at the beginning of the class, or made available online (via Moodle) prior to class. A copy of the appropriate chapter of the script, the assignment and any other assigned reading materials will be available via Moodle.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material (e.g., chapters out of certain textbooks or trade articles) will be assigned when necessary and made available via Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is part 2 of a 3 part course. Part 1 will give the student an introduction to general tools in project management. Part 3 will take the student through Project Execution of the Project.

The students will be randomly assigned to teams of 5 max. Students will be graded as a team based on the final Project report and the in-class or on line oral presentation of the Project Proposal as well as a final exam (50% exam and 50% project report and presentation). Homework will not be graded but your final report and presentation will consist mostly of your homework assignments consolidated and put in a report and presentation format.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
102-0348-00LProspective Environmental Assessments
Prerequisite for this lecture is basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools, such as material flow analysis, risk assessment and life cycle assessment.
Students without previous knowledge in these areas need to read according textbooks prior to or at the beginning of the lecture.
W3 credits2GS. Hellweg, N. Heeren, A. Spörri
AbstractThis lecture deals with prospective assessments of emerging technologies as well as with the assessment of long-term environmental impact caused by today's activities.
Objective- Understanding prospective environmental assessments, including scenario analysis techniques, prospective emission models, dynamic MFA and LCA.
- Ability to properly plan and conduct prospective environmental assessment studies, for example on emerging technologies or on technical processes that cause long-term environmental impacts.
- Being aware of the uncertainties involved in prospective studies.
- Getting to know measures to prevent long-term emissions or impact in case studies
- Knowing the arguments in favor and against a temporally differentiated weighting of environmental impacts (discounting)
Content- Scenario analysis
- Dynamic material flow analysis
- Temporal differentiation in LCA
- Systems dynamics tools
- Assessment of future and present environmental impact
- Case studies
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be made available on Moodle.
102-0248-00LInfrastructure Systems in Urban Water Management Information
Prerequisites: 102-0214-02L Urban Water Management I and 102-0215-00L Urban Water Management II.
W3 credits2GJ. P. Leitão Correia , M. Maurer, A. Scheidegger
AbstractAn increasing demand for infrastructure management skills can be observed in the environmental engineering practice. This course gives an introductory overview of infrastructure management skills needed for urban water infrastructures, with a specific focus on performance, risk and engineering economics analyses.
ObjectiveAfter successfully finishing the course, the participants will have the following skills and knowledge:
- Know the key principles of infrastructure management
- Know the basics of performance and risk assessment
- Can perform basic engineering economic analysis
- Know how to quantify the future rehabilitation needs
ContentThe nationwide coverage of water distribution and wastewater treatment is one of the major public works achievements in Switzerland and other countries. Annually and per person, 135,000 L of drinking water is produced and distributed and over 535,000 L of stormwater and wastewater is drained. These impressive services are done with a pipe network with a length of almost 200,000 km and a total replacement value of 30,000 CHF per capita.

Water services in Switzerland are moving from a phase of new constructions into one of maintenance and optimization. The aim today must be to ensure that existing infrastructure is professionally maintained, to reduce costs, and to ensure the implementation of modern, improved technologies and approaches. These challenging tasks call for sound expertise and professional management.

This course gives an introduction into basic principles of water infrastructure management. The focus is primarily on Switzerland, but most methods and conclusions are valid for many other countries.
Lecture notesThe script 'Engineering Economics for Public Water Utilities' can be downloaded from the moodle course page.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
101-0523-00LIndustrialized Construction Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3GD. Hall
AbstractThis course offers an introduction and overview to Industrialized Construction, a rapidly-emerging concept in the construction industry. The course will present the driving forces, concepts, technologies, and managerial aspects of Industrialized Construction, with an emphasis on current industry applications and future entrepreneurial opportunities in the field.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, students should be able to:
1. Describe the characteristics of the nine integrated areas of industrialized construction: planning and control of processes; developed technical systems; prefabrication; long-term relations; logistics; use of ICT; re-use of experience and measurements; customer and market focus; continuous improvement.
2. Assess case studies on successful or failed industry implementations of industrialized construction in Europe, Japan and North America.
3. Propose a framework for a new industrialized construction company for a segment of the industrialized construction market (e.g. housing, commercial, schools) including the company’s business model, technical platform, and supply chain strategy.
4. Identify future trends in industrialized construction including the use of design automation, digital fabrication, and Industry 4.0.
ContentThe application of Industrialized Construction - also referred to as prefabrication, offsite building, or modular construction – is rapidly increasing in the industry. Although the promise of industrialized construction has long gone unrealized, several market indicators show that this method of construction is quickly growing around the world. Industrialized Construction offers potential for increased productivity, efficiency, innovation, and safety on the construction site. The course will present the driving forces, concepts, technologies, and managerial aspects of Industrialized Construction. The course unpacks project-orientated vs. product-oriented approaches while showcasing process and technology platforms used by companies in Europe, the UK, Japan, and North America. The course highlights future business models and entrepreneurial opportunities for new industrialized construction ventures.

The course is organized around a group project carried out in teams of 3-4. Each specific class will include some theory about industrialized construction from a strategic and/or technological perspective. There will be several external guest lectures as well. During the last hour of the course, students will work in project teams to propose a framework for a new industrialized construction venture. The teams will need to determine their new company’s product offering, business model, technical platform, technology solutions, and supply chain strategy.

It is intended to hold a group excursion to a factory for a 1/2 day visit. However in 2021, this will be determined pending the status of COVID-19 restrictions. planned course activities include a 1/2 day factory visit Students who are unable to attend the visit can make up participation through independent research and the writing of a short paper.
LiteratureA full list of required readings will be made available to the students via Moodle.
103-0448-01LTransformation of Urban Landscapes
Only for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
W3 credits2GJ. Van Wezemael, A. Gonzalez Martinez
AbstractThe lecture course addresses the transformation of urban landscapes towards sustainable inward development. The course reconnects two largely separated complexity approaches in «spatial planning» and «urban sciences» as a basic framework to look at a number of spatial systems considering economic, political, and cultural factors. Focus lies on participation and interaction of students in groups.
Objective- Understand cities as complex adaptive systems
- Understand planning in a complex context and planning competitions as decision-making
- Seeing cities through big data and understand (Urban) Governance as self-organization
- Learn Design-Thinking methods for solving problems of inward development
- Practice presentation skills
- Practice argumentation and reflection skills by writing critiques
- Practice writing skills in a small project
- Practice teamwork
ContentStarting point and red thread of the lecture course is the transformation of urban landscapes as we can see for example across the Swiss Mittelland - but in fact also globally. The lecture course presents a theoretical foundation to see cities as complex systems. On this basis it addresses practical questions as well as the complex interplay of economic, political or spatial systems.

While cities and their planning were always complex the new era of globalization exposed and brought to the fore this complexity. It created a situation that the complexity of cities can no longer be ignored. The reason behind this is the networking of hitherto rather isolated places and systems across scales on the basis of Information and Communication Technologies. «Parts» of the world still look pretty much the same but we have networked them and made them strongly interdependent. This networking fuels processes of self-organization. In this view regions emerge from a multitude of relational networks of varying geographical reach and they display intrinsic timescales at which problems develop. In such a context, an increasing number of planning problems remain unaffected by either «command-and-control» approaches or instruments of spatial development that are one-sidedly infrastructure- or land-use orientated. In fact, they urge for novel, more open and more bottom-up assembling modes of governance and a «smart» focus on how space is actually used. Thus, in order to be effective, spatial planning and governance must be reconceptualised based on a complexity understanding of cities and regions, considering self-organizing and participatory approaches and the increasingly available wealth of data.
LiteratureA reader with original papers will be provided via the ILIAS system.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
101-0526-00LIntroduction to Visual Machine Perception for Architecture, Construction and Facility Management Information W3 credits2GI. Armeni
AbstractThe course is an introduction to Visual Machine Perception technology, and specifically Computer Vision and Machine Learning, for Architecture, Construction, and Facility Management (ACFM). It will explore fundamentals in these Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies in a tight reference to three applications in ACFM, namely architectural design, construction renovation, and facility management.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course students will develop computational thinking related to visual machine perception applications for the ACFM domain. Specifically, they will:

-Gain a fundamental understanding of how this technology works and the impact it can have in the ACFM industry by being exposed to example applications.
-Be able to identify limitations, pitfalls, and bottlenecks in these applications.
-Critically think on solutions for the above issues.
-Acquire hands-on experience in creatively thinking and designing an application given a base system.
-Use this course as a “stepping-stone” or entry-point to Machine Learning-intensive courses offered in D-BAUG and D-ARCH.
ContentThe past few years a lot of discussion has been sparked on AI in the Architecture, Construction, and Facility Management (ACFM) industry. Despite advancements in this interdisciplinary field, we still have not answered fundamental questions about adopting and adapting AI technology for ACFM. In order to achieve this, we need to be equipped with rudimentary knowledge of how this technology works and what are essential points to consider when applying AI to this specific domain.

In addition, the availability of sensors that collect visual data in commodity hardware (e.g., mobile phone and tablet), is creating an even bigger pressure in identifying ways that new technology can be leveraged to increase efficiency and decrease risk in this trillion-dollar industry. However, cautious and well-thought steps need to be taken in the right direction, in order for such technologies to thrive in an industry that showcases inertia in technological adoption.

The course will unfold as two parallel storylines that intersect in multiple places:
1) The first storyline will introduce fundamentals in computer vision and machine learning technology, as building blocks that one should consider when developing related applications. These blocks will be discussed with respect to latest developments (e.g., deep neural networks), pointing out their impact in the final solution.

2) The second storyline consists of 3 ACFM processes, namely architectural design, construction renovation, and facility management. These processes will serve as application examples of the technological storyline.
In the points of connection students will see the importance of taking into account the application requirements when designing an AI system, as well as their impact on the building blocks. Guest speakers from both the AI and ACFM domains will complement the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course does not require any background in AI, Computer Science, coding, or the ACFM domain. It is designed for students of any background and knowledge on these topics. Despite being an introductory class, it will still engage advanced students in the aforementioned topics.
101-0531-00LDigitalization for Circular Construction (D4C^2) Restricted registration - show details
All students who register go onto a waiting list and 25 of them will be selected by the lecturer
W4 credits9PC. De Wolf
AbstractStudents will learn about digital innovations for circular construction (e.g. reuse of materials) through hands-on learning: they will be accompanied on demolition sites to recover and reclaim building materials, they will learn how to use computational tools to design structures with an available stock of materials, and they will use digital fabrication techniques to build a dome on campus.
ObjectiveThe project has several goals:
•Teach students about the challenges of reuse in the built environment and how to overcome them in order to transition the construction sector from a linear to a circular economy – this can only be done through the proposed industry collaboration and hands-on, on-site learning.
•Show students how to design and built from A to Z: many engineering and architecture students end up acquiring amazing design skills, but have never been on a demolition site to disassemble the structure themselves – this course will offer this experience to them.
•Demonstrate how we can bring together two worlds that are often too distinct: low-impact construction and digital innovation – this course will explore which digital tools already used in other sectors could be beneficial for reuse and low-carbon construction.
ContentThis is a workshop-based course on circular construction on-site. During the first workshop, students will use photogrammetry from drone imagery and LiDAR scanning to capture data on building materials; Scan-to-BIM techniques for geometric reconstruction based on point-clouds; and computer-vision techniques for identifying material geometries, types, and conditions in order to make an inventory of available materials. During the second workshop, my industry partners (e.g., Baubüro in situ, Materiuum, Rotor) and I will work with the students on the disassembly of the building in a non-destructive way. During the third workshop, students will learn to use computational design tools to structurally optimize their structure’s shape with the available stock of materials. Finally, during the fourth workshop, students will build a dome structure with the reclaimed materials on the ETH campus. This class will enable students to explore all digital tools available (assessment, disassembly, design, and reassembly) for circular construction on a real-world case study.
Lecture notesWorkshop-based course & hands-on learning.
LiteratureSustainability – Circular Economy in the Digital Age special issue
Çetin, S., De Wolf, C., Bocken, N. “Circular Digital Built Environment: An Emerging Framework.” 13, 6348, DOI: 10.3390/su13116348
Prerequisites / NoticeInterest in Digitalisation and Construction.
MIBS students: 3rd semester on higher are eligible to apply.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
101-0529-00LIntroduction to Extended Reality (XR) for Architecture, Engineering, Construction, and OperationsW3 credits2GR. Kuttantharappel Soman
AbstractThe course introduces Extended Reality (XR) applied to Architecture, Engineering, Construction, and Operations (AECO). It will explore the fundamentals of XR (Virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality) in a tight reference to three applications in AECO, namely design, construction, and operations.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, students will learn the fundamentals of XR, its applications in the AECO sector, and the skills to identify, develop, and deploy XR applications for the AECO problems. Specifically, they will:
-Gain a fundamental understanding of XR, including virtual reality continuum, characteristics of XR systems, perceiving digital information, etc.
-Be able to identify the opportunities for application of XR in different stages of a project such as conception, design, construction.
-Critically think about existing solutions and identify limitations, pitfalls, and bottlenecks in existing solutions.
-Acquire hands-on experience in creative thinking and designing an XR application.
-Be able to communicate with technology developers and translate AECO end-user requirements into system requirements for application development.
ContentOver the past decade, the Architecture, Engineering, Construction, and Operations (AECO) sector has undergone significant digital transformation. It has changed how AECO professionals have created, shared, and perceived information. The information has evolved from drawings to building information models and building information models to the digital twin. Since this information is in multiple dimensions, new methods are being developed to interact and visualize them in order to exploit it for better data-driven decisions. XR allows construction professionals to visualize, understand, and communicate such complex information easily. It helps AECO professionals “see” digital content in different ways and for different purposes. To utilize this to the full potential, AECO professionals should have the skills and be equipped with the rudimentary knowledge of how this technology works and vital points to consider when applying XR to this specific domain. The course will introduce students to:
•Fundamental concepts of XR
•Emerging practice and problems in AECO domains that could leverage XR
•Developing XR systems to solve problems in the AECO domain

The course will unfold as two parallel tracks with numerous overlaps:
1) The first track will introduce fundamentals of XR, including but not limited to the virtual reality continuum, XR devices, perception, development of the virtual world, the interaction between real and virtual world, and development of XR systems.
2) The second track consists of the applications of XR in the AECO sector. It will discuss the evolution of information in the AECO sector and introduce digital twin concepts and how XR helps to interact with digital twins during design, construction, and operations. Finally, it will present the state-of-the-art in the industry (through guest speakers) and the future of XR in AECO (through research paper discussions).
The overlap will help the students understand the importance of considering the application requirements when designing an XR system and the opportunities and limitations of the technology when envisioning a new application.
Lecture notesThroughout the course, students will be asked to solve assignments and mini-exercises that would require critical thinking, research in prior work, and critical review of the existing state-of-the-art.

The course also includes a final group project. Students will be asked to creatively design and develop an application based on the material covered in the course lectures. The mini exercises throughout the semester are designed to complement the final project. In addition, slides and other material will be made available online.
Prerequisites / NoticeAlthough desirable, the course does not require any background in coding. It is designed for students of any background and knowledge on these topics. Despite being an introductory class, it will still engage advanced students in the topics mentioned above.
Major in Geotechnical Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0318-01LTunnelling II
Prerequisite: Tunnelling I
W+3 credits2GG. Anagnostou, M. Ramoni
AbstractGeotechnical aspects of mechanized tunnelling in soft ground or hard rock. Tunnelling through squeezing rock. Tunnelling through swelling rock.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the geotechnics of mechanized tunnelling.
Tunnel design and construction for high rock pressures.
ContentClosed shield tunnelling - geotechnical aspects
Tunnelling by hard rockTBMs - geotechnical aspects
Tunnelling through squeezing rock - design and analysis issues
Tunnelling through swelling rock - design and analysis issues
Lecture notesNotes
LiteratureRecommendations
101-0558-00LBlasting Technique Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24
W2 credits3GM. J. Kapp, D. Kohler, U. Streuli, M. A. von Ah
AbstractTransfer of detailled knowledge of efficient blasting techniques for tunnel and open excavation under consideration of modern explosives and firing systems as well as aspects of HSE.
ObjectiveAdvanced knowledge for planning and execution of blasting activities in open excavation or underground.
Content- Detailled theoretical and practical basics of blasting technology
- Application and effectiveness of explosives
- Application and effectiveness of nonel, electrical and electronical firing systems
- Highly effective blasting technology for open and underground excavation
- HSE
Lecture notesA literature list is included in the skript.
LiteratureA literature list is included in the skript.
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Teilnehmer müssen die Prüfungen folgender Lehrveranstaltungen bestanden haben:
•Geologie und Petrographie (1. Sem. BSc)
•Fels- und Untertagbau (6. Sem. BSc)


Der erfolgreiche Abschluss dieses Seminars berechtigt zur Teilnahme an der Prüfung zur Erlangung des Sprengausweises C für Kaderaufgaben.

WICHTIG:
Eine alleinige Einschreibung in mystudies gilt NICHT als verbindliche Kursanmeldung. Sämtliche Anmeldeinformationen sind abrufbar unter Link
101-0368-00LConstitutive and Numerical Modelling in Geotechnics Restricted registration - show details
The priority is given to the students with Major in Geotechnics.
W+6 credits4GA. Puzrin, D. Hauswirth
AbstractThis course aims to achieve a basic understanding of conventional continuum mechanics approaches to constitutive and numerical modeling of soils in getechnical problems. We focus on applications of the constitutive models within the available numerical codes. Important issue of derivation of model parameters from the lab tests has also received considerable attention.
ObjectiveThis course targets geotechnical engineers, who face these days more often the necessity of the numerical analysis in their practice. Understanding of the limitations of the built-in constitutive models is crucial for critical assessment of the results of numerical calculations, and, hence, for the conservative and cost efficient design of geotechnical structures.
The purpose of this course has been to bridge the gap between the graduate courses in Geomechanics and those in Numerical Modeling. Traditionally, in many geotechnical programs, Geomechanics is not taught within the rigorous context of Continuum Mechanics. There is a good reason for that – the behavior of soils is very complex: it is more advantageous to explain it at a semi-empirical level, instead of scaring the students away with cumbersome mathematical models. However, when it comes to Numerical Modeling courses, these are often taught using commercially available finite elements (e.g. ABAQUS, PLAXIS) or finite differences (e.g. FLAC) software, which utilize constitutive relationships within the Continuous Mechanics framework. Quite often students have to learn the challenging subject of constitutive modeling from a program manual!
ContentThis course is introductory - by no means does it claim any completeness and state of the art in such a dynamically developing field as constitutive and numerical modeling of soils. Our intention is to achieve a basic understanding of conventional continuum mechanics approaches to constitutive and numerical modeling, which can serve as a foundation for exploring more advanced theories. We focus on applications of the constitutive models within the available numerical codes. Important issue of derivation of model parameters from the lab tests has also received considerable attention.
Lecture notesHandout notes
Example worksheets
Literature- Puzrin, A.M. (2012). Constitutive Modelling in Geomechanics: Introduction. Springer Verlag. Heidelberg, 312 p.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
101-0378-00LSoil Dynamics Information W4 credits2GI. Anastasopoulos, A. Marin, L. Sakellariadis, T. M. Weber
AbstractBasic knowledge to explore soil dynamic problems, introduction into geotechnical earthquake engineering and solve simple problems
ObjectiveGoal of the lecture is to achieve a basic knowledge of soil dynamics, to be able to solve simple problems and to specify the tasks for specialists for more complex problems in different fields involved.
ContentBasics of dynamics:
Differences between soil mechanics and soil dynamics. Repition of spring - mass - damping systems. Wave propagation in ideal and non ideal soil conditions.
Dynamical Soil Properties:
Constitutive Modelling of Soils, Soil parameter for different soil types. Soil liquefaction. Determination of soil parameters in field and laboratory investigation.
Applications: Vibration calculation and isolation, geotechnical earthquake engineering from seismic hazard site amplification towards aspects of design on foundations and geotechnical structures.
Lecture notesbook (in German, see there), supported with paper and notes, which will be made available online
LiteratureTowhata, I. (2008) Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering. Springer Verlag, Berlin

Kramer, S. L. (1996) Geotechnical earthquake engineering. Pearson Education India.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of mechanics and soil mechanics is required
101-0302-00LClays in Geotechnics: Problems and ApplicationsW3 credits2GM. Plötze
AbstractThis course gives a comprehensive introduction in clay mineralogy, properties, characterising and testing methods as well as applied aspects and problems of clays and clay minerals in geotechnics.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course the student is able to:
- Describe clay minerals and their fundamental properties
- Describe/propose methods for characterisation of clays and clay minerals
- Draw conclusion about specific properties of clays with a focus to their potential use, problematics and things to consider in geotechnics and engineering geology.
Content- Introduction to clays and clay minerals (importance and application in geosciences, industry and everyday life)
- Origin of clays (formation of clays and clay minerals, geological origin)
- Clay mineral structure, classification and identification incl. methods for investigation (e.g., XRD)
- Properties of clay materials, characterisation and quantification incl. methods for investigation (e.g., cation exchange, rheology, plasticity, shearing, swelling, permeability, retardation and diffusion)
- Clay Minerals in geotechnics: Problems and applications (e.g. soil mechanics, barriers, slurry walls, tunnelling)
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be provided.
101-0388-00LPlanning of Underground Space Information Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2GA. Cornaro
AbstractUrban underground space is the undiscovered or underutilised asset that can help shape the cities of the future. Planning the urban subsurface calls for multi disciplinary professionals to work together in shaping a new urban tissue beneath our cities. The need to plan the third dimension in the subsurface is critical in making our cities future proof, resilient and sustainable.
ObjectiveGain an appreciation and knowledge of what lies beneath our feet and what an asset the underground is for our cities. The need to plan this asset is more complex than on the surface, as it is invisible and in parts impenentrable. We look at methods and tools to gain an understanding of the subsurface and what issues and challenges are involved in planning it.
ContentWeekly lectures on various topics involving cities and the subsurface:
•Major aspects of urban development
•The Subsurface as the final frontier
•Historical approaches to underground space development
•Urban sustainability aspects
•Modelling and mapping the underground
•Policy building and urban planning
•Design and architecture -creating a new urban tissue
•Constructability of underground spaces
•Future cities -resilient cities
•Governance and legal challenges
•Investment aspects and value capture
•Future proofing our infrastructure
•Best practice of underground space use
•Excursion to underground facility (if possible)
•Guest speakers on relevant topics
Lecture notes•Presentation slides
•Book: Underground Spaces Unveiled: Planning and Creating the Cities of the Future, ICE Publishing, 2018, Admiraal, H., Cornaro, A., ISBN 978-0-7277-6145-3
•Numerous additional relevant book excerpts and articles, as well as relevant videos
•Material from guest presenters
•See also link "learning materials"
Literaturevarious articles and books will be recommended during the course

please see also weblinks "learning materials"
Major in Structural Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0138-00LBridge Design Information W6 credits4GW. Kaufmann
AbstractThis course presents the fundamentals of bridge design. It covers the entire range from conceptual design to construction, encompassing all relevant building materials. The focus lies on the structural behaviour of today’s most important bridge typologies and their suitability for certain boundary conditions, the dimensioning of the main structural elements as well as construction methods.
ObjectiveAfter successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:
- Define the main bridge design parameters and identify constraints and boundary conditions
- Explain the structural behaviour and peculiarities of today’s most important bridge typologies
- Explain the main elements of bridges and their structural behaviour
- Define the relevant actions on bridges
- Dimension a standard bridge (pre-dimensioning by hand; dimensioning using computer-aided tools)
- Explain the most relevant bridge construction and erection methods
- Select an appropriate typology and conceive a convincing bridge for a site with its specific boundary conditions
- Name the most eminent bridge designers and their relevant works
ContentThe course is built up as follows:
1. Introduction
2. Conceptual design
3. Superstructure / Girder bridges
4. Support and articulation
5. Substructure
6. Arch bridges
7. Frame bridges
8. Special girder bridges
9. Cable-supported bridges

The course is complemented by
- Guest lectures by leading bridge designers active in industry
- Inverted classroom exercises on conceptual bridge design
- Slides on eminent bridge designers and their works
- Exercises (homework)
Lecture notesLecture notes (slides with explanations)
LiteratureMenn C.: Prestressed Concrete Bridges. Basel: Birkhäuser Basel, 1990
(available online at ETH Library)

Hirt, M., Lebet, J.P.: Steel Bridges. EPFL Press, New York, 2013
(available online at ETH Library)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is part of the MSc specialisation in structures and requires solid knowledge in structural analysis and design. Students are assumed to be proficient in the material taught in the following courses offered in the BSc in Civil Engineering at ETH Zurich (or have acquired equivalent knowledge elsewhere):
- Theory of structures I+II
- Steel structures I+II (incl. steel-concrete composite structures)
- Structural Concrete I+II (incl. prestressed concrete)

The flipped classroom exercises are preparing the students for Part 1 of the exam (conceptual design). Active participation is highly recommended to all students who have not conceived a bridge.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCooperation and Teamworkassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
101-0148-01LBuilding StructuresW3 credits2GA. Frangi, M. Klippel, H. Seelhofer
AbstractInteraction between building and structure; Identify and qualify the significant correlations; Consequences in the design and the layout of structure; Choice of structure depending on the relevant parameters.
ObjectiveGet to know building structures in its entirety
ContentIndroduction
Interaction between building and structure
Bearing structures of high-rise buildings
Stabilization of structure and stuctural members
Lecture notespresentation script
Literature"Hochbau für Ingenieure", Bachmann Hugo, vdf Verlag Zürich und B.G. Teubner Verlag Stuttgart, 1993
101-0158-01LMethod of Finite Elements I Information W5 credits3GE. Chatzi, P. Steffen
AbstractThe course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of the Method of Finite Elements, including element formulations, numerical solution procedures and modelling details. We aim to equip students with the ability to code algorithms (based on Python) for the solution of practical problems of structural analysis.
DISCLAIMER: the course is not an introduction to commercial software.
ObjectiveThe Direct Stiffness Method is revisited and the basic principles of Matrix Structural Analysis are overviewed.
The basic theoretical concepts of the Method of Finite Elements are imparted and perspectives for problem solving procedures are provided.
Linear finite element models for truss and continuum elements are introduced and their application for structural elements is demonstrated.
The Method of Finite Elements is implemented on practical problems through accompanying demonstrations and assignments.
Content1) Introductory Concepts
Matrices and linear algebra - short review.

2) The Direct Stiffness Method
Demos and exercises in Python

3) Formulation of the Method of Finite Elements.
- The Principle of Virtual Work
- Isoparametric formulations
- 1D Elements (truss, beam)
- 2D Elements (plane stress/strain)
Demos and exercises in Python

4) Practical application of the Method of Finite Elements.
- Practical Considerations
- Results Interpretation
- Exercises, where structural case studies are modelled and analyzed
Lecture notesThe lecture notes are in the form of slides, available online from the course webpage:
Link
LiteratureStructural Analysis with the Finite Element Method: Linear Statics, Vol. 1 & Vol. 2 by Eugenio Onate (available online via the ETH Library)

Supplemental Reading
Bathe, K.J., Finite Element Procedures, Prentice Hall, 1996.
Prerequisites / NoticePrior basic knowledge of Python is necessary.
101-0168-00LTimber Structures IIW3 credits2GA. Frangi, M. Klippel, R. Steiger
AbstractBasic knowledge of structural timber design including material behaviour especially anisotropy, moisture and long duration effects and their consideration in structural analysis and detailing. Design, detailing and structural analysis of timber roof structures, buildings and bridges.
ObjectiveComprehension and application of basic knowledge of structural timber design including material behaviour especially anisotropy, moisture and long duration effects and their consideration in structural analysis and detailing. Design, detailing and structural analysis of timber roof structures, buildings and bridges.
ContentField of application of timber structures; Timber as building material (wood structure, physical and mechanical properties of wood and wood-based products); Durability; Principles of design and dimensioning; Connections (dowels, nails, screws, glued connections); Timber components and assemblies (mechanically jointed beams, trusses); Design and detaling of timber roof structures, buildings and bridges.
Lecture notesAutography Timber Structures
Copies of lecture slides
LiteratureTimber design tables HBT 1, Lignum (2012)
Swiss Standard SIA 265 (2012)
Swiss Standard SIA 265/1 (2009)
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: basic knowledge in structural analysis
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