Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Environmental Sciences Bachelor Information
Students can choose between one Bachelor thesis of 10KP or two Bachelor theses of 5KP each.

In principle, all professors and lecturers involved in the teaching of the Environmental Sciences degree programme are entitled to supervise a Bachelor's thesis (BA).
BA in the area of social sciences and humanities can only be supervised by lecturers who teach in this area. The same applies to BA in the field of natural sciences and technology.
If the thesis is supervised by a person who does not teach in the Environmental Sciences degree programme or who does not have ETH lecturer status, then the student has to fill in the "Form for supervisors of a Bachelor thesis who do not teach in the Environmental Sciences degree programme" Link
Basic Courses I
First Year Examinations
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0007-00LTackling Environmental Problems I Restricted registration - show details
Only for Environmental Sciences BSc.
O5 credits4GC. E. Pohl, M. Mader, B. B. Pearce
AbstractEach year in the case study we analyse a different topic from the field of sustainable development and develop solutions to it.
ObjectiveStudents are able:
- carry out research on a given topic and present the results in a structured report which (a) shows the state of knowledge and (b) the need for knowledge and action (UPL I).
- to integrate knowledge of diverse perspectives in a qualitative systems model, to identify problems and to suggest possible solutions from a specific stakeholder's perspective (UPL II).
- name the different roles within a group, explain the role(s) they are suited for, self-organise in groups, identify problems of collaboration and constructively address the problems (UPL I and II).
ContentIn the first semester the students compile what is known about the case topic, its principles and challenges. Each group of students makes an inquiry to a given part of the overall problem. The inquiry includes a thematic as well as stakeholder analysis. The results are written in a report and presented at an internal conference.

During synthesis week, which takes place during semester break, the results of the different part inquiries are integrated in a qualitative system model. The students identify specific problems and develop solutions.

In the second semester, students work independently and in exchange with stakeholders on previously identified problems. They develop a sustainability project with concrete measures that they could implement voluntarily in the third semester. The course concludes with the presentation of the student projects on the "Market of Measures".

Most of the time students work independently in groups. Tutors support the students in key steps. Introductions are given for:
- The overall topic of the case study (by external experts),
- Inquiry, scientific writing and managing references (by experts of ETH library),
- Role behaviour and collaboration in groups,
- Preparing reports, posters and presentations,
- Qualitative system modelling (SystemQ),
- Developing solutions (design thinking, Checklands' soft systems methodology, sustainability assessment).
Lecture notesTutors will compile the case study dossier on the basis of the student reports.
LiteratureMethodological documentation will be made available on Moodle during the case study together with the relevant background literature.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesProject Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCooperation and Teamworkassessed
Personal CompetenciesSelf-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
701-0027-00LEnvironmental Systems IO2 credits2VC. Schär, N. Dubois, G. Velicer
AbstractThe lecture provides a science-based exploration of environmental aspects from three research fields: earth, climate, and health sciences.
ObjectiveThe students are able to explain important properties of the three environmental systems, to discuss critical drivers, trends and conflicts of their use, and to compare potential solutions.
ContentThe lecture discusses the role of the environmental systems based on selected environmental problems, among these the exploration of raw materials and fossil fuels, climate change and its impacts on man and environment, and the spread and control of infectious diseases in the human population and agricultural systems.
Lecture notesSlides are provided by instructors and are accessible via moodle.
701-0029-00LEnvironmental Systems IIO3 credits2VA. Patt, H. Bugmann, N. Gruber
AbstractThe lecture provides a science-based exploration of three important environmental systems: Inland waters, forest, and of food systems.
ObjectiveThe students are able to explain important functions of the three environmental systems, to discuss critical drivers, trends and conflicts of their use and to compare potential solutions.
ContentAquatic ecosystems and their function, water use and its impact, water pollution and water treatment, water and health, water technologies, water & energy.

Forests and agroforest systems, trends and drivers of land use changes, sustainable forest management.

The main functions, trends and challenges of agricultural and food systems are discussed based on the four dimensions of food security (availability, access, utilization of food and stability of the food systems).
Lecture notesLecture notes or other documentation are provided by instructors and accessible via moodle.
701-0243-01LBiology III: Essentials of EcologyO3 credits2VC. Buser Moser
AbstractThis introductory lecture in ecology covers basic ecological concepts and the most important levels of complexity in ecological research. Ecological concepts are exemplified by using aquatic and terrestrial systems; corresponding methodological approaches are demonstrated. Threats to biodiversity and the appropriate management are discussed.
ObjectiveThe objective of this lecture is to teach basic ecological concepts and the different levels of complexity in ecological research.
The students should learn ecological concepts at these different levels in the context of concrete examples from terrestrial and aquatic ecology. Corresponding methods for studying the systems will be presented.
A further aim of the lecture is that students achieve an understanding of biodiversity, why it is threatened and how it can be managed.
Content- Einfluss von Umweltfaktoren (Temperatur, Strahlung, Wasser, Nährstoffe etc.) auf Organismen; Anpassung an bestimmte Umweltbedingungen
- Populationsdynamik: Ursachen, Beschreibung, Vorhersage und Regulation
- Interaktionen zwischen Arten (Konkurrenz, Koexistenz, Prädation, Parasitismus, Nahrungsnetze)
- Lebensgemeinschaften: Struktur, Stabilität, Sukzession
- Ökosysteme: Kompartimente, Stoff- und Energieflusse
- Biodiversität: Variation, Ursachen, Gefährdung und Erhaltung
- Aktuelle Naturschutzprobleme und -massnahmen
- Evolutionäre Ökologie: Methodik, Spezialisierung, Koevolution
Lecture notesUnterlagen, Vorlesungsfolien und relevante Literatur sind in Moddle abrufbar. Die Unterlagen für die nächste Vorlesung stehen jeweils spätestens am Freitagmorgen zur Verfügung.
LiteratureGenerelle Ökologie:
Townsend, Harper, Begon 2009. Ökologie. Springer, ca. Fr. 70.-

Aquatische Ökologie:
Lampert & Sommer 1999. Limnoökologie. Thieme, 2. Aufl., ca. Fr. 55.-;
Bohle 1995. Limnische Systeme. Springer, ca. Fr. 50.-

Naturschutzbiologie:
Baur B. et al. 2004. Biodiversität in der Schweiz. Haupt, Bern, 237 S.
Primack R.B. 2004. A primer of conservation biology. 3rd ed. Sinauer, Mass. USA, 320 pp.
401-0251-00LMathematics IO6 credits4V + 2UF. Da Lio
AbstractThis course covers mathematical concepts and techniques necessary to model, solve and discuss scientific problems - notably through ordinary differential equations.
ObjectiveMathematics is of ever increasing importance to the Natural Sciences and Engineering. The key is the so-called mathematical modelling cycle, i.e. the translation of problems from outside of mathematics into mathematics, the study of the mathematical problems (often with the help of high level mathematical software packages) and the interpretation of the results in the original environment.

The goal of Mathematics I and II is to provide the mathematical foundations relevant for this paradigm. Differential equations are by far the most important tool for modelling and are therefore a main focus of both of these courses.
Content1. Single-Variable Calculus:
review of differentiation, linearisation, Taylor polynomials, maxima and minima, antiderivative, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration methods, improper integrals.

2. Linear Algebra and Complex Numbers:
systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, cartesian and polar forms for complex numbers, complex powers, complex roots, fundamental theorem of algebra.

3. Ordinary Differential Equations:
separable ordinary differential equations (ODEs), integration by substitution, 1st and 2nd order linear ODEs, homogeneous systems of linear ODEs with constant coefficients, introduction to 2-dimensional dynamical systems.
Literature- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Part 1 (Pearson Addison-Wesley).
- Bretscher, O.: Linear Algebra with Applications (Pearson Prentice Hall).
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: familiarity with the basic notions from Calculus, in particular those of function and derivative.
529-2001-02LChemistry IO4 credits2V + 2UJ. Cvengros, J. E. E. Buschmann, P. Funck, E. C. Meister, R. Verel
AbstractGeneral Chemistry I: Chemical bond and molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium.
ObjectiveIntroduction to general and inorganic chemistry. Basics of the composition and the change of the material world. Introduction to the thermodynamically controlled physico-chemical processes. Macroscopic phenomena and their explanation through atomic and molecular properties. Using the theories to solve qualitatively and quantitatively chemical and ecologically relevant problems.
Content1. Stoichiometry
Amount of substance and mass. Composition of chemical compounds. Reaction equation. Ideal gas law.
2. Atoms
Elementary particles and atoms. Electron configuration of the elements. Periodic system.
3. Chemical bonding and its representation. Spatial arrangement of atoms in molecules. Molecular orbitals.
4. Basics of chemical thermodynamics
System and surroundings. Description of state and change of state of chemical systems.
5. First law of thermodynamics
Internal energy. Heat and Work. Enthalpy and reaction enthalpy.
6. Second law of thermodynamics
Entropy. Change of entropy in chemical systems and universe. Reaction entropy.
7. Gibbs energy and chemical potential.
Combination of laws of thermodynamics. Gibbs energy and chemical reactions. Activities of gases, condensed substances and species in solution. Equilibrium constant.
8. Chemical equilibrium
Law of mass action. Reaction quotient and equilibrium constant. Phase transition equilibrium.
9. Acids and bases
Properties of acids and bases. Dissociation of acids and bases. pH and the calculation of pH-values in acid-base systems. Acid-base diagrams. Buffers. Polyprotic acids and bases.
10. Dissolution and precipitation.
Heterogeneous equilibrium. Dissolution and solubility product. Carbon dioxide-carbonic acid-carbonate equilibrium.
Lecture notesOnline-Skript mit durchgerechneten Beispielen.
LiteratureCharles E. Mortimer, CHEMIE - DAS BASISWISSEN DER CHEMIE. 12. Auflage, Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, 2015.

Weiterführende Literatur:
Theodore L. Brown, H. Eugene LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, CHEMIE. 10. Auflage, Pearson Studium, 2011. (deutsch)

Catherine Housecroft, Edwin Constable, CHEMISTRY: AN INTRODUCTION TO ORGANIC, INORGANIC AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY, 3. Auflage, Prentice Hall, 2005.(englisch)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
551-0001-00LGeneral Biology I Restricted registration - show details O3 credits3VU. Sauer, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractOrganismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.
First in a series of two lectures given over two semesters for students of agricultural and food sciences, as well as of environmental sciences.
ObjectiveThe understanding of some basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.
ContentThe first semester focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates
Lecture notesno script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2017) Biology - A Global Approach. 11th Edition (Global Edition
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is the first in a series of two lectures given over two semesters for students with biology as as a basic subject.
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