Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Environmental Sciences Bachelor Information
Social Sciences and Humanities
Electives
Module Economics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
751-1101-10LFinances and Accounting System Information W2 credits2GC. Müller
AbstractTo understand accounting and calculation of costs.
ObjectiveAbility to keep accounts and calculate costs
ContentThe course includes the steps of establishing and evaluation of financial accounting, including balance sheet, income statement and double-entry accounting. Furthermore, cash flow statement and financial ratios are discussed. Finally, management accounting including cost accounting and cost-performance analysis are presented. The course includes exercises.
Lecture notesscript in German
LiteratureMeyer, C., 2012, Betriebswirtschaftliches Rechnungswesen, 3. Überarbeitete Auflage, Schulthess, Zürich.
701-0758-00LEcological Economics: Introduction with Focus on Growth CriticsW2 credits2VI. Seidl
AbstractStudents become acquainted with the basics / central questions / analyses of Ecological Economics. Thereby, central will be the topic of economic growth. What are the positions of Ecological Economics in this regard? What are the theories and concepts to found this position in general and in particular economic areas (e.g. resource consumption, efficiency, consumption, labour market, enterprises)?
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with basics and central questions of Ecological Economics (EE): e.g. 'pre-analytic vision', field of discipline, development EE, contributions of involved disciplines such as ecology or political sciences, ecological-economic analysis of topics such as labour market, consumption, money. Critical analysis of growth and learning about approaches to reduce growth pressures.
ContentWhat is Ecological Economics, what are the topics?
Field of the discipline and basics
Resource consumption, its development and measurements
Measurement of economic activity and welfare
Economic growth, growth critics and post-growth society
Consumption, Money, Enterprises, labour market and growth pressures
Starting points for a post-growth society
Lecture notesNo Script. Slides and texts will be provided beforehand.
LiteratureDaly, H. E. / Farley, J. (2004). Ecological Economics. Principles and Applications. Washington, Island Press.

Seidl, I. /Zahrnt A. (2010). Postwachstumsgesellschaft. Konzepte für die Zukunft, Marburg, Metropolis
Seidl, I. /Zahrnt A. (2019). Tätigsein in der Postwachstumsgesellschaft, Marburg, Metropolis

Ausgewählte wissenschaftliche Artikel.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in a lecture on environmental economics or otherwise basic knowledge of economics (e.g. A-Level)
701-0764-00LCrtical Reflection Upon the Economic Growth Paradigm Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

Target groups: Agricultural Sciences (BSc/MSc) and Environmental Sciences (BSc/MSc).
W1 credit1SI. Seidl
AbstractIn this seminar we will read and discuss about three scientific papers which thoroughly and critically deal with economic growth and environmental topics.
ObjectiveEnhanced knowledge on ecological economics, growth critics of ecological economics, energetical-material implications of growth, consumer criticism and growth-critical traditions of thought. Reading and reflection upon scientific textes.
ContentGrowth theory, growth paradigm, growth criticism, energy, entropy, neoclassics versus ecological economics, consumer theories and consumerism.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in course 701-0758-00L Ecological Economics: basics and growth critisism (parallel oder former participation) or very good basic knowledge in ecological economics or environmental economicse
363-0532-00LEconomics of Sustainable DevelopmentW3 credits2VL. Bretschger
AbstractConcepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability;
neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources; pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve; sustainability policy.
ObjectiveThe aim is to develop an understanding of the implications of sustainable development for the long-run development of economies. It is to be shown to which extent the potential for growth to be sustainable depends on substitution possibilities, technological change and environmental policy.
After successful completion of this course, students are able to
1. understand the causes of long-term economic development
2. analyse the influence of natural resources and pollution on the development of social welfare
3. to appropriately classify the role of politics in the pursuit of sustainability goals.
ContentThe lecture introduces different concepts and paradigms of sustainable development. Building on this foundation and following a general introduction to the modelling of economic growth, conditions for growth to be sustainable in the presence of pollution and scarce natural resources are derived. Special attention is devoted to the scope for substitution and role of technological progress in overcoming resource scarcities. Implications of environmental externalities are regarded with respect to the design of environmental policies.
Concepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability, sustainability optimism vs. pessimism;
introduction to neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution possibilities and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve: concept, theory and empirical results;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources, Hartwick rule, resource saving technological change.
Lecture notesWill be provided successively in the course of the semester.
LiteratureBretschger, F. (1999), Growth Theory and Sustainable Development, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Bretschger, L. (2004), Wachstumstheorie, Oldenbourg, 3. Auflage, München.

Bretschger, L. (2018), Greening Economy, Graying Society, CER-ETH Press, ETH Zurich.

Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common (2011), Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Longman , 4th ed., Essex.

Neumayer, E. (2003), Weak and Strong Sustainability, 2nd ed., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
363-1038-00LSustainability Start-Up Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2GA. H. Sägesser
AbstractExperts lead participants through a venturing process inspired by Lean and Design Thinking methodologies. The course contains problem identification, idea generation and evaluation, team formation, and the development of one entrepreneurial idea per team. A special focus is put on sustainability, in particular on climate change and biodiversity.
Objective1. Students have experienced and know how to take the first steps towards co-creating a venture and potentially company
2. Students reflect deeply on sustainability issues (with a focus on climate change & biodiversity) and can formulate a problem statement
3. Students believe in their ability to bring change to the world with their own ideas
4. Students are able to apply entrepreneurial practices such as the lean startup approach
5. Students have built a first network and know how to proceed and who to approach in case they would like to take their ventures further.
ContentThis course is aimed at people with a keen interest to address sustainability issues (with a focus on climate change and biodiversity), with a curious mindset, and potentially first ideas for entrepreneurial action!

The seminar consists of a mix of lectures, workshops, individual working sessions, teamwork, and student presentations/pitches. This class is taught by a reflective practitioner of entrepreneurial action for societal transformation. Real-world climate entrepreneurs and experts from the Swiss start-up and sustainability community will be invited to support individual sessions.

All course content is based on latest international entrepreneurship practices.

The seminar starts with an introduction to sustainability (with a special focus on climate change & energy) and entrepreneurship. Students are asked to self-select into an area of their interest in which they will develop entrepreneurial ideas throughout the course.

The first part of the course then focuses on deeply understanding sustainability problems within the area of interest. Through workshops and self-study, students will identify key design challenges, generate ideas, as well as provide systematic and constructive feedback to their peers.

In the second part of the course, students will form teams around their generated ideas. In these teams they will develop a business model and, following the lean start-up process, conduct real-life testing, as well as pivoting of these business models.

In the final part of the course, students present their insights gained from the lean start-up process, as well as pitch their entrepreneurial ideas and business models to an expert jury. The course will conclude with a session that provides students with a network and resources to further pursue their entrepreneurial journey.
Lecture notesAll material will be made available to the participants.
LiteratureNo pre-reading required.

Recommended literature:
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite:
Interest in sustainability & entrepreneurship.

Notes:
1. It is not required that participants already have an idea for entrepreneurial action at the beginning of the course.
2. Focus is on entrepreneurial action which can take many forms. Eg. startup, SME, campaign, intrapreneurial action, non-profit, ...
2. No legal entities (e.g. GmbH, Association, AG) need to be founded for this course.

Target participants:
PhD students, Msc students and MAS students from all departments. The number of participants is limited to max.30.

Waiting list:
After subscribing you will be added to the waiting list.
The lecturer will contact you a few weeks before the start of the seminar to confirm your interest and to ensure a good mixture of study backgrounds, only then you're accepted to the course.
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