Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Biology Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2013)
3. Year, 6. Semester
Block Courses
Registration for Block courses is mandatory. Please register under Link.
Registration period from 19.12.2020 bis 09.01.2021

Please note the ETH admission criteria for the admission of ETH students to ETH block courses on the block course registration website under "allocation".
Block Courses in 3rd Quarter of the Semester
From 20.04.2021 to 12.05.2021
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0362-00LMolecular Health: Biomedical Analysis of the Extracellular Interactome Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course. Please keep reserve masks ready. Surgical masks (IIR) or medical grade masks (FFP2) without a valve are permitted. Community masks (fabric masks) are not allowed.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
W6 credits7PB. Wollscheid, E. Tschudy-Milani
AbstractIn this course you will learn to measure, integrate, analyze and validate the cellular surfaceome as a complex information gateway connecting the intracellular to the extracellular interactome. You will apply next generation technologies at the interface of biology, chemistry, medicine and bioinformatics to establish the surfaceome proteotype and its signaling interaction networks.
Objective"If a cell surface molecule such as the B cell receptor would have the size of a human being, then the cell surface of a B cell would have roughly the size of three times NYC Central Park." How many people/proteins/proteoforms reside in this space ("Surfaceome")? Similar to humans, proteins don't act alone. Function is encoded in dynamic protein-protein interactions. How are these proteoforms organized in signaling islands/networks in order to fulfill specific cellular functions ("Interactome")? What are the ligands interacting with the surfaceome to communicate information from other cells & tissues in the body? What goes wrong in these signaling islands if we get sick?

In this course you will learn to measure, integrate, analyze and validate the cellular surfaceome and its signaling islands as a complex information gateway connecting the intracellular to the extracellular interactome. You will apply next generation technologies at the interface of biology, chemistry, medicine and bioinformatics to generate unprecedented data to establish the surfaceome proteotype and its signaling interaction networks. This digital proteotype data layer provides the basis for generating qualitative and quantitative surfaceome models explaining how molecular nanoscale organization influences cellular signaling and biological function.
Content"If a cell surface molecule such as the B cell receptor would have the size of a human being, then the cell surface of a B cell would have roughly the size of three times NYC Central Park." How many people/proteins/proteoforms reside in this space ("Surfaceome")? Similar to humans, proteins don't act alone. Function is encoded in dynamic protein-protein interactions. How are these proteoforms organized in signaling islands/networks in order to fulfill specific cellular functions ("Interactome")? What are the ligands interacting with the surfaceome to communicate information from other cells & tissues in the body? What goes wrong in these signaling islands if we get sick?

In this course you will learn to measure, integrate, analyze and validate the cellular surfaceome and its signaling islands as a complex information gateway connecting the intracellular to the extracellular interactome. You will apply next generation technologies at the interface of biology, chemistry, medicine and bioinformatics to generate unprecedented data to establish the surfaceome proteotype and its signaling interaction networks. This digital proteotype data layer provides the basis for generating qualitative and quantitative surfaceome models explaining how molecular nanoscale organization influences cellular signaling and biological function.
LiteratureD. Bausch-Fluck, E. S. Milani, B. Wollscheid, Surfaceome nanoscale organization and extracellular interaction networks, Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 48, 26–33 (2019).

Link
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires a basic knowledge in mass spectrometry based proteomics and experience in computational data processing using R or MatLab. Ideally this course should be combined with course 551-0352-00L "Introduction to Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics".
529-0810-01LLaboratory Course Organic Chemistry II (for D-BIOL) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

Please contact Prof. C. Thilgen (Link) as early as possible, end of Autumn Semester. You will get a confirmation if you are accepted.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

The de-facto language of instruction depends on the tutor.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course (keep reserve masks ready). Permitted are masks IIR or FFP2. Community masks are not permitted.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
W12 credits4PC. Thilgen
AbstractAn organic-synthetic sub-project of the current research of a group from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry is carried out under the guidance of doctoral students.
ObjectiveLearn to plan and carry out challenging multistep syntheses making use of modern methods; reach a deeper understanding of organic reactions through experimental work; develop an organic-synthetic research project; take accurate notes, write a publication style report, and present the obtained results in a seminar.
ContentAn organic-synthetic sub-project of the current research of a group from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry is carried out under the guidance of doctoral students.
Lecture notesNo course notes.
LiteratureNo set textbooks. Literature will be indicated or provided by the supervising TAs.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisites: Accomplished laboratory course Organic Chemistry I (529-0229-00) and passed session exam Organic Chemistry I (529-0221-00 or 529-1011-00) / Organic Chemistry II (529-0222-00 or 529-1012-00). The number of participants is limited to 12.
551-0344-00LPlant Microbiomes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 8.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course. Please keep reserve masks ready. Surgical masks (IIR) or medical grade masks (FFP2) without a valve are permitted. Community masks (fabric masks) are not allowed.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
W6 credits7PJ. Vorholt-Zambelli
AbstractLaboratory course. Research projects in the field of plant microbiomes are conducted in small groups. They address open questions related to plant microbiomes and include microbial community assembly, microbial interactions, plant protection and plant immunity.
ObjectiveIntroduction to relevant subjects of the biology of plant-associated microorganisms. Training in practical work in a research laboratory. Exposure to current research topics in the field of plant microbiomes. Scientific writing in form of a research report.
ContentResearch project in plant microbiomes. The techniques used will depend on the project, e.g. PCR, cloning, microbial community analysis via next-generation sequencing, plant inoculation experiments, phenotypic analyses, fluorescence microscopy, gene expression, metabolomics, bioinformatics
Lecture notesnone
LiteratureWill be provided for each of the projects at the beginning of the course.
551-1556-00LMacromolecular Structure Determination Using Modern Methods Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 11 in the 3rd semester quarter of the spring semester

Number of participants limited to 12 in the 4th semester quarter of the spring semester

The block course will only take place with a minimum of 4 participants.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course. Please keep reserve masks ready. Surgical masks (IIR) or medical grade masks (FFP2) without a valve are permitted. Community masks (fabric masks) are not allowed.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
W6 credits7PK. Locher, R. Irobalieva, J. Kowal, G. Schertler
AbstractThis course will expose the students to two prominent techniques for high-resolution structural characterization of biological macromolecules. The students will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience in either cryo-electron microscopy (ETH) or X-ray crystallography (PSI).
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to introduce the students to the principles of high-resolution structure determination. Students will conduct hands-on experiments and use computational techniques for data processing.
ContentAt the ETH the students will prepare and vitrify a protein and then image it on a cryo-TEM. Next, the students will process the data and build an atomic model into the EM map.

At the PSI the students will purify and crystallize a membrane protein, collect X-ray diffraction data using synchrotron X-ray source or with cryo-EM, analyze and build an atomic model into a density map. They will refine this model and interpret and illustrate the determined structure. The course work is trying to present insights in the use of structural information. The course also includes a demonstration of the Synchrotron capabilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (SLS).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students will be split into two groups for the practical part of the work: One group will work at ETH Hönggerberg, the other at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at Villigen. All students will spend one full day at the PSI for a tour of the facilities, including a visit of the synchrotron beam lines of the Swiss Light Source SLS.

The students joining the ETH Hönggerberg group will spend the majority of the time on data processing and are therefore expected to have some basic knowledge of bash terminal commands. Basic physics, optics and linear algebra knowledge is also helpful. By the end of the course, the students will be expected to understand concepts such as the difference between Fourier and real space, image formation, contrast transfer, fast Fourier transfer and Fourier shell correlation.
551-1312-00LRNA-Biology II Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 14.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course. Please keep reserve masks ready. Surgical masks (IIR) or medical grade masks (FFP2) without a valve are permitted. Community masks (fabric masks) are not allowed.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
W6 credits7PS. Jonas, F. Allain, J. Corn, U. Kutay, O. Voinnet
AbstractIntroduction to the diversity of current RNA-research at all levels from structural biology to systems biology using mainly model systems like S. cerevisiae (yeast), mammalian cells.
ObjectiveThe students will obtain an overview about the diversity of current RNA-research. They will learn to design experiments and use techniques necessary to analyze different aspects of RNA biology. Through lectures and literature seminars, they will learn about the burning questions of RNA research and discuss approaches to address these questions experimentally. In practical lab projects the students will work in one of the participating laboratories. Finally, they will learn how to present and discuss their data in an appropriate manner. Student assessment is a graded semester performance based on individual performance in the laboratory, the written exam and the project presentation.
Lecture notesRelevant material from the lectures will be made available during the course via the corresponding Moodle page.
LiteratureDocumentation and recommended literature will be provided at the beginning and during the course.
551-1300-00LCause and Consequences of Unstable Genomes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 14.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course. Please keep reserve masks ready. Surgical masks (IIR) or medical grade masks (FFP2) without a valve are permitted. Community masks (fabric masks) are not allowed.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
W6 credits7PM. Jagannathan, Y. Barral, C. Beyer, K. Bomblies, R. Kroschewski, G. Neurohr
AbstractThe course will introduce students to key concepts and laboratory research within the broad field of "Genome stability".
ObjectiveStudents will learn to design, apply and evaluate current research strategies in a wide range of modern research areas encompassing the broad field of "Genome stability".
ContentThe course will consist of lectures, practical laboratory work in small groups, informal progress report sessions, and the presentation of laboratory work. Lectures will expose students to key concepts and techniques in the field. Students will team into small groups and work in one laboratory for the duration of the course. Students will meet regularly for informal "progress report" discussions of their projects. Student performance will be assessed based on the quality of their practical work, a written exam on frontal lecture material, and a presentation of their practical work.
LiteratureDocumentation and recommended literature in the form of review articles and selected primary literature will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course will be taught in English.
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