Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2021

CAS in Informatik Information
Fokusfächer und Wahlfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W7 KP2V + 2U + 2AR. Wattenhofer, M. Ghaffari
KurzbeschreibungWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
LernzielDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
InhaltDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
SkriptAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteraturLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
227-1034-00LComputational Vision (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI402

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
Link
W6 KP2V + 1UD. Kiper
KurzbeschreibungThis course focuses on neural computations that underlie visual perception. We study how visual signals are processed in the retina, LGN and visual cortex. We study the morpholgy and functional architecture of cortical circuits responsible for pattern, motion, color, and three-dimensional vision.
LernzielThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
InhaltThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
LiteraturBooks: (recommended references, not required)
1. An Introduction to Natural Computation, D. Ballard (Bradford Books, MIT Press) 1997.
2. The Handbook of Brain Theorie and Neural Networks, M. Arbib (editor), (MIT Press) 1995.
252-0312-00LUbiquitous Computing Information W6 KP2V + 3AC. Holz
KurzbeschreibungUbiquitous Computing means interacting with information and with each other anywhere, mediated through miniature technology everywhere. We will investigate the technical aspects of Ubicomp, particularly sensing, processing, and sense making: input (touch & gesture), activity, monitoring cardiovascular health and neurological conditions, context & location sensing, affective computing.
LernzielThe course will combine high-level concepts with low-level technical methods needed to sense, detect, and understand them.

High-level:
– input modalities for interactive systems (touch, gesture)
– "activities" and "events" (exercises and other mechanical activities such as movements and resulting vibrations)
– health monitoring (basic cardiovascular physiology)
– location (GPS, urban simulations, smart cities and development)
– affective computing (emotions, mood, personality)

Low-level:
– sampling (Shannon Nyquist) and filtering (FIR, IIR), time and frequency domains (Fourier transforms)
– cross-modal sensor systems, signal synchronization and correlation
– event detection, classification, prediction using basic signal processing as well as learning-based methods
– sensor types: optical, mechanical/acoustic, electromagnetic

– signals modalities and processing of: application (modalities/methods)
* touch detection (resistive sensing, capacitive sensing, diffuse illumination/DI, spectral reflections, frustrated total internal reflection/FTIR, fingerprint scanning, surface-acoustic waves)
* gesture recognition (inertial sensing through accelerometers, gyroscopes)
* activity detection and tracking (inertial, acoustic, vibrotactile for classification, counting, vibrometry)
* occupation and use (electricity monitoring, water consumption, single-point sensing)
* cardiovascular (electrocardioagraphy, photoplethysmography, pulse oximetry, ballistocardiography, blood pressure, pulse transit time, bio impedance)
* affective computing (heart rate variability, R-R intervals, electrodermal activity, sympathetic tone, facial expressions)
* neurological (fatigue, fatigability)
* location (GPS, BLE, Wifi)
Inhalt"The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it" — Mark Weiser, 1991.

This is the premise of Ubiquitous Computing, a vision that is slowly becoming reality as everything is a device and we can interact with information and with each other anywhere, mediated through miniature technology. Along with this change, interaction modalities have changed, too, from explicit input on keyboards and mice to implicit and passively observed input through sensors in the environment (e.g., speakers, cameras, temperature/occupancy detectors) and those we now wear on our bodies (e.g., health sensors, activity sensors, miniature computers we call smartwatches).

In this course, we will look at the technical side of Ubicomp, particularly
– sensing (incl. 'signals', sampling, data acquisition methods, controlled user studies, uncontrolled studies in-the-wild),
– processing (incl. frequencies, feature extraction, detection), and
– sense making: input sensing (touch & gesture), activity sensing (motion), monitoring cardiovascular health, affective state, neurological conditions (with basics on cardiovascular physiology + PPG, PulseOx, ECG, EDA, BCG, SCG, HRV, BioZ, IPG, PAT, PTT), context & location sensing (GPS/Wifi, motion).

Lectures will be accompanied by practical sessions that focus on sensor modalities and signal processing. Here, we will work on existing data sets and devise methods to record our own data for processing and prediction purposes.

A series of reading assignments, covering both well-established publications in Ubicomp as well as emerging results and methods, will bridge the fundamentals and topics taught in class to academic research and real-world problems.

More information on the course site: Link
SkriptCopies of slides will be made available. Lectures will be recorded and made available online.

More information on the course site: Link
LiteraturWill be provided in the lecture. To put you in the mood:
Mark Weiser: The Computer for the 21st Century. Scientific American, September 1991, pp. 94-104
252-0526-00LStatistical Learning Theory Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AJ. M. Buhmann, C. Cotrini Jimenez
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers advanced methods of statistical learning:

- Variational methods and optimization.
- Deterministic annealing.
- Clustering for diverse types of data.
- Model validation by information theory.
LernzielThe course surveys recent methods of statistical learning. The fundamentals of machine learning, as presented in the courses "Introduction to Machine Learning" and "Advanced Machine Learning", are expanded from the perspective of statistical learning.
Inhalt- Variational methods and optimization. We consider optimization approaches for problems where the optimizer is a probability distribution. We will discuss concepts like maximum entropy, information bottleneck, and deterministic annealing.

- Clustering. This is the problem of sorting data into groups without using training samples. We discuss alternative notions of "similarity" between data points and adequate optimization procedures.

- Model selection and validation. This refers to the question of how complex the chosen model should be. In particular, we present an information theoretic approach for model validation.

- Statistical physics models. We discuss approaches for approximately optimizing large systems, which originate in statistical physics (free energy minimization applied to spin glasses and other models). We also study sampling methods based on these models.
SkriptA draft of a script will be provided. Lecture slides will be made available.
LiteraturHastie, Tibshirani, Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning, Springer, 2001.

L. Devroye, L. Gyorfi, and G. Lugosi: A probabilistic theory of pattern recognition. Springer, New York, 1996
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of machine learning (introduction to machine learning and/or advanced machine learning)
Basic knowledge of statistics.
252-0538-00LShape Modeling and Geometry Processing Information W8 KP2V + 1U + 4AO. Sorkine Hornung
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers the fundamentals and some of the latest developments in geometric modeling and geometry processing. Topics include surface modeling based on point clouds and polygonal meshes, mesh generation, surface reconstruction, mesh fairing and parameterization, discrete differential geometry, interactive shape editing, topics in digital shape fabrication.
LernzielThe students will learn how to design, program and analyze algorithms and systems for interactive 3D shape modeling and geometry processing.
InhaltRecent advances in 3D geometry processing have created a plenitude of novel concepts for the mathematical representation and interactive manipulation of geometric models. This course covers the fundamentals and some of the latest developments in geometric modeling and geometry processing. Topics include surface modeling based on point clouds and triangle meshes, mesh generation, surface reconstruction, mesh fairing and parameterization, discrete differential geometry, interactive shape editing and digital shape fabrication.
SkriptSlides and course notes
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
Visual Computing, Computer Graphics or an equivalent class. Experience with C++ programming. Solid background in linear algebra and analysis. Some knowledge of differential geometry, computational geometry and numerical methods is helpful but not a strict requirement.
252-0579-00L3D Vision Information W5 KP3G + 1AM. Pollefeys, V. Larsson
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers camera models and calibration, feature tracking and matching, camera motion estimation via simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and visual odometry (VO), epipolar and mult-view geometry, structure-from-motion, (multi-view) stereo, augmented reality, and image-based (re-)localization.
LernzielAfter attending this course, students will:
1. understand the core concepts for recovering 3D shape of objects and scenes from images and video.
2. be able to implement basic systems for vision-based robotics and simple virtual/augmented reality applications.
3. have a good overview over the current state-of-the art in 3D vision.
4. be able to critically analyze and asses current research in this area.
InhaltThe goal of this course is to teach the core techniques required for robotic and augmented reality applications: How to determine the motion of a camera and how to estimate the absolute position and orientation of a camera in the real world. This course will introduce the basic concepts of 3D Vision in the form of short lectures, followed by student presentations discussing the current state-of-the-art. The main focus of this course are student projects on 3D Vision topics, with an emphasis on robotic vision and virtual and augmented reality applications.
252-0820-00LInformation Technology in Practice
Previously called Case Studies from Practice
W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AM. Brandis
KurzbeschreibungThe course is designed to provide students with an understanding of "real-life" computer science challenges in business settings and teach them how to address these.
LernzielStudents will learn important considerations of companies when applying information technology in practice, including costs, economic value and risks of information technology use, or impact of information technology on business strategy and vice versa. They will get insight into how companies have used or are using information technology to be successful. Students will also learn how to assess information technology decisions from different viewpoints, including technical experts, IT managers, business users, and business top managers.

The course will equip participants to understand the role computer science and information technology plays in different companies and to contribute to respective decisions as they enter into practice.
InhaltThe course consists of multiple lectures on economics of information technology, business and IT strategy, and how they are interlinked, and a set of relevant case studies. They address how companies become more successful using information technology, how bad information technology decisions can hurt them, and they look into a number of current challenges companies face regarding their information technology.

The cases are taken both from documented international case studies as well as from Swiss companies participating in the course.

The learned concepts will be applied in exercises, which form a key component of the course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course builds on the earlier "Case Studies from Practice" course, with a stronger focus on learning key concepts of information technology use in practice and applying them in exercises, and only a limited number of case studies.
The course prepares students for participation in the subsequent "Case Studies from Practice Seminar", which provides deeper insights into actual cases and how to solve them.
252-1424-00LModels of ComputationW6 KP2V + 2U + 1AM. Cook
KurzbeschreibungThis course surveys many different models of computation: Turing Machines, Cellular Automata, Finite State Machines, Graph Automata, Circuits, Tilings, Lambda Calculus, Fractran, Chemical Reaction Networks, Hopfield Networks, String Rewriting Systems, Tag Systems, Diophantine Equations, Register Machines, Primitive Recursive Functions, and more.
LernzielThe goal of this course is to become acquainted with a wide variety of models of computation, to understand how models help us to understand the modeled systems, and to be able to develop and analyze models appropriate for new systems.
InhaltThis course surveys many different models of computation: Turing Machines, Cellular Automata, Finite State Machines, Graph Automata, Circuits, Tilings, Lambda Calculus, Fractran, Chemical Reaction Networks, Hopfield Networks, String Rewriting Systems, Tag Systems, Diophantine Equations, Register Machines, Primitive Recursive Functions, and more.
252-3005-00LNatural Language Processing Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 400.
W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AR. Cotterell
KurzbeschreibungThis course presents topics in natural language processing with an emphasis on modern techniques, primarily focusing on statistical and deep learning approaches. The course provides an overview of the primary areas of research in language processing as well as a detailed exploration of the models and techniques used both in research and in commercial natural language systems.
LernzielThe objective of the course is to learn the basic concepts in the statistical processing of natural languages. The course will be project-oriented so that the students can also gain hands-on experience with state-of-the-art tools and techniques.
InhaltThis course presents an introduction to general topics and techniques used in natural language processing today, primarily focusing on statistical approaches. The course provides an overview of the primary areas of research in language processing as well as a detailed exploration of the models and techniques used both in research and in commercial natural language systems.
LiteraturJacob Eisenstein: Introduction to Natural Language Processing (Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning series)
252-5706-00LMathematical Foundations of Computer Graphics and Vision Information W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AT. Aydin, A. Djelouah
KurzbeschreibungThis course presents the fundamental mathematical tools and concepts used in computer graphics and vision. Each theoretical topic is introduced in the context of practical vision or graphic problems, showcasing its importance in real-world applications.
LernzielThe main goal is to equip the students with the key mathematical tools necessary to understand state-of-the-art algorithms in vision and graphics. In addition to the theoretical part, the students will learn how to use these mathematical tools to solve a wide range of practical problems in visual computing. After successfully completing this course, the students will be able to apply these mathematical concepts and tools to practical industrial and academic projects in visual computing.
InhaltThe theory behind various mathematical concepts and tools will be introduced, and their practical utility will be showcased in diverse applications in computer graphics and vision. The course will cover topics in sampling, reconstruction, approximation, optimization, robust fitting, differentiation, quadrature and spectral methods. Applications will include 3D surface reconstruction, camera pose estimation, image editing, data projection, character animation, structure-aware geometry processing, and rendering.
261-5110-00LOptimization for Data Science Information W10 KP3V + 2U + 4AB. Gärtner, D. Steurer, N. He
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an in-depth theoretical treatment of optimization methods that are particularly relevant in data science.
LernzielUnderstanding the theoretical guarantees (and their limits) of relevant optimization methods used in data science. Learning general paradigms to deal with optimization problems arising in data science.
InhaltThis course provides an in-depth theoretical treatment of optimization methods that are particularly relevant in machine learning and data science.

In the first part of the course, we will first give a brief introduction to convex optimization, with some basic motivating examples from machine learning. Then we will analyse classical and more recent first and second order methods for convex optimization: gradient descent, Nesterov's accelerated method, proximal and splitting algorithms, subgradient descent, stochastic gradient descent, variance-reduced methods, Newton's method, and Quasi-Newton methods. The emphasis will be on analysis techniques that occur repeatedly in convergence analyses for various classes of convex functions. We will also discuss some classical and recent theoretical results for nonconvex optimization.

In the second part, we discuss convex programming relaxations as a powerful and versatile paradigm for designing efficient algorithms to solve computational problems arising in data science. We will learn about this paradigm and develop a unified perspective on it through the lens of the sum-of-squares semidefinite programming hierarchy. As applications, we are discussing non-negative matrix factorization, compressed sensing and sparse linear regression, matrix completion and phase retrieval, as well as robust estimation.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAs background, we require material taught in the course "252-0209-00L Algorithms, Probability, and Computing". It is not necessary that participants have actually taken the course, but they should be prepared to catch up if necessary.
261-5120-00LMachine Learning for Health Care Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 150.
W5 KP3P + 1AV. Boeva, G. Rätsch, J. Vogt
KurzbeschreibungThe course will review the most relevant methods and applications of Machine Learning in Biomedicine, discuss the main challenges they present and their current technical problems.
LernzielDuring the last years, we have observed a rapid growth in the field of Machine Learning (ML), mainly due to improvements in ML algorithms, the increase of data availability and a reduction in computing costs. This growth is having a profound impact in biomedical applications, where the great variety of tasks and data types enables us to get benefit of ML algorithms in many different ways. In this course we will review the most relevant methods and applications of ML in biomedicine, discuss the main challenges they present and their current technical solutions.
InhaltThe course will consist of four topic clusters that will cover the most relevant applications of ML in Biomedicine:
1) Structured time series: Temporal time series of structured data often appear in biomedical datasets, presenting challenges as containing variables with different periodicities, being conditioned by static data, etc.
2) Medical notes: Vast amount of medical observations are stored in the form of free text, we will analyze stategies for extracting knowledge from them.
3) Medical images: Images are a fundamental piece of information in many medical disciplines. We will study how to train ML algorithms with them.
4) Genomics data: ML in genomics is still an emerging subfield, but given that genomics data are arguably the most extensive and complex datasets that can be found in biomedicine, it is expected that many relevant ML applications will arise in the near future. We will review and discuss current applications and challenges.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesData Structures & Algorithms, Introduction to Machine Learning, Statistics/Probability, Programming in Python, Unix Command Line

Relation to Course 261-5100-00 Computational Biomedicine: This course is a continuation of the previous course with new topics related to medical data and machine learning. The format of Computational Biomedicine II will also be different. It is helpful but not essential to attend Computational Biomedicine before attending Computational Biomedicine II.
263-2812-00LProgram Verification Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 30.
W5 KP3G + 1AP. Müller, C. Matheja
KurzbeschreibungA hands-on introduction to the theory and construction of deductive program verifiers, covering both powerful techniques for formal program reasoning, and a perspective over the tool stack making up modern verification tools.
LernzielStudents will earn the necessary skills for designing, developing, and applying deductive verification tools that enable the modular verification of complex software, including features challenging for reasoning such as heap-based mutable data and concurrency. Students will learn both a variety of fundamental reasoning principles, and how these reasoning ideas can be made practical via automatic tools.

By the end of the course, students should have a good working understanding and decisions involved with designing and building practical verification tools, including the underlying theory. They will also be able to apply such tools to develop formally-verified programs.
InhaltThe course will cover verification techniques and ways to automate them by introducing a verifier for a small core language and then progressively enriching the language with advanced features such as a mutable heap and concurrency. For each language extension, the course will explain the necessary reasoning principles, specification techniques, and tool support. In particular, it will introduce SMT solvers to prove logical formulas, intermediate verification languages to encode verification problems, and source code verifiers to handle feature-rich languages. The course will intermix technical content with hands-on experience.
SkriptThe slides will be available online.
LiteraturWill be announced in the lecture.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesA basic familiarity with propositional and first-order logic will be assumed. Courses with an emphasis on formal reasoning about programs (such as Formal Methods and Functional Programming) are advantageous background, but are not a requirement.
263-2815-00LAutomated Software TestingW7 KP2V + 1U + 3AZ. Su
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces students to classic and modern techniques for the automated testing and analysis of software systems for reliability, security, and performance. It covers both techniques and their applications in various domains (e.g., compilers, databases, theorem provers, operating systems, machine/deep learning, and mobile applications), focusing on the latest, important results.
Lernziel* Learn fundamental and practical techniques for software testing and analysis

* Understand the challenges, open issues and opportunities across a variety of domains (security/systems/compilers/databases/mobile/AI/education)

* Understand how latest automated testing and analysis techniques work

* Gain conceptual and practical experience in techniques/tools for reliability, security, and performance

* Learn how to perform original and impactful research in this area
InhaltThe course will be organized into the following components: (1) classic and modern testing and analysis techniques (coverage metrics, mutation testing, metamorphic testing, combinatorial testing, symbolic execution, fuzzing, static analysis, etc.), (2) latest results on techniques and applications from diverse domains, and (3) open challenges and opportunities.

A major component of this course is a class project. All students (individually or two-person teams) are expected to select and complete a course project. Ideally, the project is original research related in a broad sense to automated software testing and analysis. Potential project topics will also be suggested by the teaching staff.

Students must select a project and write a one or two pages proposal describing why what the proposed project is interesting and giving a work schedule. Students will also write a final report describing the project and prepare a 20-30 minute presentation at the end of the course.

The due dates for the project proposal, final report, and project presentation will be announced.

The course will cover results from the Advanced Software Technologies (AST) Lab at ETH as well as notable results elsewhere, providing good opportunities for potential course project topics as well as MSc project/thesis topics.
SkriptLecture notes/slides and other lecture materials/handouts will be available online.
LiteraturReading material and links to tools will be published on the course website.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe prerequisites for this course are some programming and algorithmic experience. Background and experience in software engineering, programming languages/compilers, and security (as well as operating systems and databases) can be beneficial.
263-2925-00LProgram Analysis for System Security and Reliability Information W7 KP2V + 1U + 3AM. Vechev
KurzbeschreibungSecurity issues in modern systems (blockchains, datacenters, deep learning, etc.) result in billions of losses due to hacks and system downtime. This course introduces fundamental techniques (ranging from automated analysis, machine learning, synthesis, zero-knowledge and their combinations) that can be applied in practice so to build more secure and reliable modern systems.
Lernziel* Understand the fundamental techniques used to create modern security and reliability analysis engines that are used worldwide.

* Understand how symbolic techniques are combined with machine learning (e.g., deep learning, reinforcement learning) so to create new kinds of learning-based analyzers.

* Understand how to quantify and fix security and reliability issues in modern deep learning models.

* Understand open research questions from both theoretical and practical perspectives.
InhaltPlease see: Link for detailed course content.
263-3501-00LFuture Internet Information
Takes place for the last time!
W7 KP1V + 1U + 4AA. Singla
KurzbeschreibungThis course will discuss recent advances in networking, with a focus on the Internet, with topics ranging from the algorithmic design of applications like video streaming to the likely near-future of satellite-based networking.
LernzielThe goals of the course are to build on basic undergraduate-level networking, and provide an understanding of the tradeoffs and existing technology in the design of large, complex networked systems, together with concrete experience of the challenges through a series of lab exercises.
InhaltThe focus of the course is on principles, architectures, protocols, and applications used in modern networked systems. Example topics include:

- How video streaming services like Netflix work, and research on improving their performance.
- How Web browsing could be made faster
- How the Internet's protocols are improving
- Exciting developments in satellite-based networking (ala SpaceX)
- The role of data centers in powering Internet services

A series of programming assignments will form a substantial part of the course grade.
SkriptLecture slides will be made available at the course Web site: Link
LiteraturNo textbook is required, but there will be regularly assigned readings from research literature, liked to the course Web site: Link.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAn undergraduate class covering the basics of networking, such as Internet routing and TCP. At ETH, Computer Networks (252-0064-00L) and Communication Networks (227-0120-00L) suffice. Similar courses from other universities are acceptable too.
263-3710-00LMachine Perception Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 200.
W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AO. Hilliges, S. Tang
KurzbeschreibungRecent developments in neural networks (aka “deep learning”) have drastically advanced the performance of machine perception systems in a variety of areas including computer vision, robotics, and intelligent UIs. This course is a deep dive into deep learning algorithms and architectures with applications to a variety of perceptual tasks.
LernzielStudents will learn about fundamental aspects of modern deep learning approaches for perception. Students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in learning-based computer vision, robotics and HCI. The final project assignment will involve training a complex neural network architecture and applying it on a real-world dataset of human activity.

The core competency acquired through this course is a solid foundation in deep-learning algorithms to process and interpret human input into computing systems. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the problem of recognizing people in images, detecting and describing body parts, inferring their spatial configuration, performing action/gesture recognition from still images or image sequences, also considering multi-modal data, among others.
InhaltWe will focus on teaching: how to set up the problem of machine perception, the learning algorithms, network architectures and advanced deep learning concepts in particular probabilistic deep learning models

The course covers the following main areas:
I) Foundations of deep-learning.
II) Probabilistic deep-learning for generative modelling of data (latent variable models, generative adversarial networks and auto-regressive models).
III) Deep learning in computer vision, human-computer interaction and robotics.

Specific topics include: 
I) Deep learning basics:
a) Neural Networks and training (i.e., backpropagation)
b) Feedforward Networks
c) Timeseries modelling (RNN, GRU, LSTM)
d) Convolutional Neural Networks for classification
II) Probabilistic Deep Learning:
a) Latent variable models (VAEs)
b) Generative adversarial networks (GANs)
c) Autoregressive models (PixelCNN, PixelRNN, TCNs)
III) Deep Learning techniques for machine perception:
a) Fully Convolutional architectures for dense per-pixel tasks (i.e., instance segmentation)
b) Pose estimation and other tasks involving human activity
c) Deep reinforcement learning
IV) Case studies from research in computer vision, HCI, robotics and signal processing
LiteraturDeep Learning
Book by Ian Goodfellow and Yoshua Bengio
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes***
In accordance with the ETH Covid-19 master plan the lecture will be fully virtual. Details on the course website.
***

This is an advanced grad-level course that requires a background in machine learning. Students are expected to have a solid mathematical foundation, in particular in linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. The course will focus on state-of-the-art research in deep-learning and will not repeat basics of machine learning

Please take note of the following conditions:
1) The number of participants is limited to 200 students (MSc and PhDs).
2) Students must have taken the exam in Machine Learning (252-0535-00) or have acquired equivalent knowledge
3) All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as Pytorch, scikit-learn and scikit-image. We will provide introductions to Pytorch and other libraries that are needed but will not provide introductions to basic programming or Python.

The following courses are strongly recommended as prerequisite:
* "Visual Computing" or "Computer Vision"

The course will be assessed by a final written examination in English. No course materials or electronic devices can be used during the examination. Note that the examination will be based on the contents of the lectures, the associated reading materials and the exercises.
263-3800-00LAdvanced Operating Systems Information W7 KP2V + 2U + 2AD. Cock, T. Roscoe
KurzbeschreibungThis course is intended to give students a thorough understanding of design and implementation issues for modern operating systems, with a particular emphasis on the challenges of modern hardware features. We will cover key design issues in implementing an operating system, such as memory management, scheduling, protection, inter-process communication, device drivers, and file systems.
LernzielThe goals of the course are, firstly, to give students:

1. A broader perspective on OS design than that provided by knowledge of Unix or Windows, building on the material in a standard undergraduate operating systems class

2. Practical experience in dealing directly with the concurrency, resource management, and abstraction problems confronting OS designers and implementers

3. A glimpse into future directions for the evolution of OS and computer hardware design
InhaltThe course is based on practical implementation work, in C and assembly language, and requires solid knowledge of both. The work is mostly carried out in teams of 3-4, using real hardware, and is a mixture of team milestones and individual projects which fit together into a complete system at the end. Emphasis is also placed on a final report which details the complete finished artifact, evaluates its performance, and discusses the choices the team made while building it.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course is based around a milestone-oriented project, where students work in small groups to implement major components of a microkernel-based operating system. The final assessment will be a combination grades awarded for milestones during the course of the project, a final written report on the work, and a set of test cases run on the final code.
263-3855-00LCloud Computing Architecture Information W9 KP3V + 2U + 3AG. Alonso, A. Klimovic
KurzbeschreibungCloud computing hosts a wide variety of online services that we use on a daily basis, including web search, social networks, and video streaming. This course will cover how datacenter hardware, systems software, and application frameworks are designed for the cloud.
LernzielAfter successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) reason about performance, energy efficiency, and availability tradeoffs in the design of cloud system software, 2) describe how datacenter hardware is organized and explain why it is organized as such, 3) implement cloud applications as well as analyze and optimize their performance.
InhaltIn this course, we study how datacenter hardware, systems software, and applications are designed at large scale for the cloud. The course covers topics including server design, cluster management, large-scale storage systems, serverless computing, data analytics frameworks, and performance analysis.
SkriptLecture slides will be available on the course website.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesUndergraduate courses in 1) computer architecture and 2) operating systems, distributed systems, and/or database systems are strongly recommended.
263-4400-00LAdvanced Graph Algorithms and Optimization Information W8 KP3V + 1U + 3AR. Kyng, M. Probst
KurzbeschreibungThis course will cover a number of advanced topics in optimization and graph algorithms.
LernzielThe course will take students on a deep dive into modern approaches to
graph algorithms using convex optimization techniques.

By studying convex optimization through the lens of graph algorithms,
students should develop a deeper understanding of fundamental
phenomena in optimization.

The course will cover some traditional discrete approaches to various graph
problems, especially flow problems, and then contrast these approaches
with modern, asymptotically faster methods based on combining convex
optimization with spectral and combinatorial graph theory.
InhaltStudents should leave the course understanding key
concepts in optimization such as first and second-order optimization,
convex duality, multiplicative weights and dual-based methods,
acceleration, preconditioning, and non-Euclidean optimization.

Students will also be familiarized with central techniques in the
development of graph algorithms in the past 15 years, including graph
decomposition techniques, sparsification, oblivious routing, and
spectral and combinatorial preconditioning.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is targeted toward masters and doctoral students with an
interest in theoretical computer science.

Students should be comfortable with design and analysis of algorithms, probability, and linear algebra.

Having passed the course Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) is highly recommended, but not formally required. If you are not
sure whether you're ready for this class or not, please consult the
instructor.
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