Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2018)
Electronics and Photonics
The core courses and specialisation courses below are a selection for students who wish to specialise in the area of "Electronics and Photonics", see Link.

The individual study plan is subject to the tutor's approval.
Core Courses
These core courses are particularly recommended for the field of "Electronics and Photonics".
You may choose core courses form other fields in agreement with your tutor.

A minimum of 24 credits must be obtained from core courses during the MSc EEIT.
Foundation Core Courses
Fundamentals at bachelor level, for master students who need to strengthen or refresh their background in the area.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0110-00LAdvanced Electromagnetic WavesW6 credits2V + 2UP. Leuchtmann, U. Koch
AbstractThis course provides advanced knowledge of electromagnetic waves in linear materials including negative index and other non classical materials.
ObjectiveThe behavior of electromagnetic waves both in free space and in selected environments including stratified media, material interfaces and waveguides is understood. Material models in the time harmonic regime including negative index and plasmonic materials are clarified.
ContentDescription of generic time harmonic electromagnetic fields; the role of the material in Maxwell's equations; energy transport and power loss mechanism; EM-waves in homogeneous space: ordinary and evanescent plane waves, cylindrical and spherical waves, "complex origin"-waves and beams; Scattering at coated surfaces; EM-waves in stratified media; generic guiding mechanism for EM waves; classical wave guides, dielectric wave guides.
Lecture notesA script including animated wave representations as well as the view graphs are provided in electronic form.
LiteratureSee literature list in the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is taught in German while both the script and the view graphs are in English.
227-0112-00LHigh-Speed Signal Propagation Information
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits2V + 2UC. Bolognesi
AbstractUnderstanding of high-speed signal propagation in microwave cables and integrated circuits and printed circuit boards.

As clock frequencies rise in the GHz domain, there is a need grasp signal propagation to maintain good signal integrity in the face of symbol interference and cross-talk.

The course is of high value to all interested in high-speed analog (RF, microwave) or digital systems.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of high-speed signal propagation in interconnects, microwave cables and integrated transmission lines such as microwave integrated circuits and/or printed circuit boards.

As system clock frequencies continuously rise in the GHz domain, a need urgently develops to understand high-speed signal propagation in order to maintain good signal integrity in the face of phenomena such as inter-symbol interference (ISI) and cross-talk.

Concepts such as Scattering parameters (or S-parameters) are key to the characterization of networks over wide bandwidths. At high frequencies, all structures effectively become "transmission lines." Unless care is taken, it is highly probable that one ends-up with a bad transmission line that causes the designed system to malfunction.

Filters will also be considered because it turns out that some of the problems associated by lossy transmission channels (lines, cables, etc) can be corrected by adequate filtering in a process called "equalization."
ContentTransmission line equations of the lossless and lossy TEM-transmission line. Introduction of current and voltage waves. Representation of reflections in the time and frequency domain. Application of the Smith chart. Behavior of low-loss transmission lines. Attenuation and impulse distortion due to skin effect. Transmission line equivalent circuits. Group delay and signal dispersion. Coupled transmission lines. Scattering parameters.
Butterworth-, Chebychev- and Bessel filter approximations: filter synthesis from low-pass filter prototypes.
Lecture notesScript: Leitungen und Filter (In German).
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises will be held in English.
227-0116-00LVLSI I: From Architectures to VLSI Circuits and FPGAs Information W6 credits5GF. K. Gürkaynak, L. Benini
AbstractThis first course in a series that extends over three consecutive terms is concerned with tailoring algorithms and with devising high performance hardware architectures for their implementation as ASIC or with FPGAs. The focus is on front end design using HDLs and automatic synthesis for producing industrial-quality circuits.
ObjectiveUnderstand Very-Large-Scale Integrated Circuits (VLSI chips), Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC), and Field-Programmable Gate-Arrays (FPGA). Know their organization and be able to identify suitable application areas. Become fluent in front-end design from architectural conception to gate-level netlists. How to model digital circuits with SystemVerilog. How to ensure they behave as expected with the aid of simulation, testbenches, and assertions. How to take advantage of automatic synthesis tools to produce industrial-quality VLSI and FPGA circuits. Gain practical experience with the hardware description language SystemVerilog and with industrial Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools.
ContentThis course is concerned with system-level issues of VLSI design and FPGA implementations. Topics include:
- Overview on design methodologies and fabrication depths.
- Levels of abstraction for circuit modeling.
- Organization and configuration of commercial field-programmable components.
- FPGA design flows.
- Dedicated and general purpose architectures compared.
- How to obtain an architecture for a given processing algorithm.
- Meeting throughput, area, and power goals by way of architectural transformations.
- Hardware Description Languages (HDL) and the underlying concepts.
- SystemVerilog
- Register Transfer Level (RTL) synthesis and its limitations.
- Building blocks of digital VLSI circuits.
- Functional verification techniques and their limitations.
- Modular and largely reusable testbenches.
- Assertion-based verification.
- Synchronous versus asynchronous circuits.
- The case for synchronous circuits.
- Periodic events and the Anceau diagram.
- Case studies, ASICs compared to microprocessors, DSPs, and FPGAs.

During the exercises, students learn how to model FPGAs with SystemVerilog. They write testbenches for simulation purposes and synthesize gate-level netlists for FPGAs. Commercial EDA software by leading vendors is being used throughout.
Lecture notesTextbook and all further documents in English.
LiteratureH. Kaeslin: "Top-Down Digital VLSI Design, from Architectures to Gate-Level Circuits and FPGAs", Elsevier, 2014, ISBN 9780128007303.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital circuits.

Examination:
In written form following the course semester (spring term). Problems are given in English, answers will be accepted in either English oder German.

Further details:
Link
227-0145-00LSolid State Electronics and Optics Information W6 credits4GN. Yazdani, V. Wood
Abstract"Solid State Electronics" is an introductory condensed matter physics course covering crystal structure, electron models, classification of metals, semiconductors, and insulators, band structure engineering, thermal and electronic transport in solids, magnetoresistance, and optical properties of solids.
ObjectiveUnderstand the fundamental physics behind the mechanical, thermal, electric, magnetic, and optical properties of materials.
Prerequisites / NoticeRecommended background:
Undergraduate physics, mathematics, semiconductor devices
227-0166-00LAnalog Integrated Circuits Information W6 credits2V + 2UT. Jang
AbstractThis course provides a foundation in analog integrated circuit design based on bipolar and CMOS technologies.
ObjectiveIntegrated circuits are responsible for much of the progress in electronics in the last 50 years, particularly the revolutions in the Information and Communications Technologies we witnessed in recent years. Analog integrated circuits play a crucial part in the highly integrated systems that power the popular electronic devices we use daily. Understanding their design is beneficial to both future designers and users of such systems.
The basic elements, design issues and techniques for analog integrated circuits will be taught in this course.
ContentReview of bipolar and MOS devices and their small-signal equivalent circuit models; Building blocks in analog circuits such as current sources, active load, current mirrors, supply independent biasing etc; Amplifiers: differential amplifiers, cascode amplifier, high gain structures, output stages, gain bandwidth product of op-amps; stability; comparators; second-order effects in analog circuits such as mismatch, noise and offset; data converters; frequency synthesizers; switched capacitors.
The exercise sessions aim to reinforce the lecture material by well guided step-by-step design tasks. The circuit simulator SPECTRE is used to facilitate the tasks. There is also an experimental session on op-amp measurements.
Lecture notesHandouts of presented slides. No script but an accompanying textbook is recommended.
LiteratureBehzad Razavi, Design of Analog CMOS Integrated Circuits (Irwin Electronics & Computer Engineering) 1st or 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill Education
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