Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Environmental Engineering Master Information
Majors
Major Urban Water Management
Compulsory Moudules
Ecological System Design
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0348-00LProspective Environmental Assessments
Prerequisite for this lecture is basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools, such as material flow analysis, risk assessment and life cycle assessment.
Students without previous knowledge in these areas need to read according textbooks prior to or at the beginning of the lecture.
O3 credits2GS. Hellweg, N. Heeren, A. Spörri
AbstractThis lecture deals with prospective assessments of emerging technologies as well as with the assessment of long-term environmental impact caused by today's activities.
Objective- Understanding prospective environmental assessments, including scenario analysis techniques, prospective emission models, dynamic MFA and LCA.
- Ability to properly plan and conduct prospective environmental assessment studies, for example on emerging technologies or on technical processes that cause long-term environmental impacts.
- Being aware of the uncertainties involved in prospective studies.
- Getting to know measures to prevent long-term emissions or impact in case studies
- Knowing the arguments in favor and against a temporally differentiated weighting of environmental impacts (discounting)
Content- Scenario analysis
- Dynamic material flow analysis
- Temporal differentiation in LCA
- Systems dynamics tools
- Assessment of future and present environmental impact
- Case studies
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be made available on Moodle.
Process Engineering in Urban Water Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0217-01LProcess Engineering Ib Information
Prerequisite: 102-0217-00L Process Engineering Ia (given in HS).
O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to build on the fundamental understanding of biological processes and wastewater treatment applications that were studied in Process Engineering Ia. Case studies that are jointly discussed in class and student led projects allow you to advance the understanding and critical analysis of biological treatment processes.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate existing wastewater treatment plants and future designs using basic process understanding, mathematical modeling tools, and knowledge obtained from the current literature. The students shall be capable to apply and recognize the limits of the kinetic models which have been developed to simulate these systems.
ContentAdvanced modeling of activated sludge systems
Nitrification, denitrification, and biological P elimination
Enrichment in mixed culture systems using, e.g., selectors
Biofilm kinetics and application to full scale plants
Critical review of treatment processes
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: 102-0217-00 Process Engineering Ia (held in HS).
102-0218-00LProcess Engineering II (Physical-Chemical Processes) Information O6 credits4GK. M. Udert
AbstractDescription and design of physical, chemical and biological processes and process combinations in drinking water and wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of critical water quality parameters in water resources and wastewater and process engineering knowledge for the removal of drinking water and environmental hazards. The aims of the lecture are basic understanding of mainly physico-chemical water treatment processes, design and modeling tools of single processes and process combinations.
ContentThe following prcesses and process combination will be discussed in detail:
Gas transfer
Particle characterization
Sedimentation
Flocculation
Filtration
Membrane processes
Precipitation processes
Chemical oxidation and disinfection
Ion exchange
Activated carbon adsorption
Process combinations wastewater
Removal of nitrogen
Removal of micropollutants
Process combinations potable water
LiteratureM&E: Tchobanoglous, G., Stensel, H.D., Tsuchihashi, R. and Burton, F.L., 2013. Wastewater engineering: treatment and resource recovery. 5th edition. Volume 1 & 2. New York, McGraw-Hill.
MWH: Crittenden, J.C., Trussel, R.R., Hand, D.W., Howe, K., Tchobanoglous, G., 2012. MWH's water treatment principles and design, 3rd edition. ed. Wiley, Hoboken, N.J.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-condition: Lecture Process Engineering Ia
System Analysis in Urban Water Management
Offered in the autumn semester.
Water Infrastructure Planning and Stormwater Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0248-00LInfrastructure Systems in Urban Water Management Information
Prerequisites: 102-0214-02L Urban Water Management I and 102-0215-00L Urban Water Management II.
O3 credits2GJ. P. Leitão Correia , M. Maurer, A. Scheidegger
AbstractAn increasing demand for infrastructure management skills can be observed in the environmental engineering practice. This course gives an introductory overview of infrastructure management skills needed for urban water infrastructures, with a specific focus on pipe deterioration and engineering economics.
ObjectiveAfter successfully finishing the class, the participants will have the following skills and knowledge:
- They can perform basic engineering economic analysis
- Know the typical value and costs involved in running a wastewater infrastructure
- Know the key principles of infrastructure management
- Know how to quantify the future rehabilitation demand
ContentThe nationwide coverage of water distribution and wastewater treatment is one of the major public works achievements in Switzerland and other countries. Annually and per person, 135,000 kg of drinking water is produced and distributed and over 535,000 kg of stormwater and wastewater is drained. These impressive services are done with a pipe network with a length of almost 200,000 km and a total replacement value of 30,000 CHF per capita.

Water services in Switzerland are moving from a phase of new constructions into one of maintenance and optimization. The aim today must be to ensure that existing infrastructure is professionally maintained, to reduce costs, and to ensure the implementation of modern, improved technologies and approaches. These challenging tasks call for sound expertise and professional management.

This course gives an introduction into basic principles of water infrastructure management. The focus is primarily on Switzerland, but most methods and conclusions are valid for many other countries.
Lecture notesThe script 'Engineering Economics for Public Water Utilities' can be downloaded on the course website:
Link
LiteratureSee the reading resources on the course website:
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse website:
Link
  •  Page  1  of  1