Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialization: General Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Major in Molecular Biology and Biophysics
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-1402-00LMolecular and Structural Biology VI: Biophysical Analysis of Macromolecular Mechanisms
This course is strongly recommended for the Masters Major "Biology and Biophysics".
W4 credits2VR. Glockshuber, T. Ishikawa, S. Jonas, B. Schuler, E. Weber-Ban
AbstractThe course is focussed on biophysical methods for characterising conformational transitions and reaction mechanisms of proteins and biological mecromolecules, with focus on methods that have not been covered in the Biology Bachelor Curriculum.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to give the students a broad overview on biopyhsical techniques available for studying conformational transitions and complex reaction mechanisms of biological macromolecules. The course is particularly suited for students enrolled in the Majors "Structural Biology and Biophysics", "Biochemistry" and "Chemical Biology" of the Biology MSc curriculum, as well as for MSc students of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences".
ContentThe biophysical methods covered in the course include advanced reaction kinetics, methods for the thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of protein-ligand interactions, static and dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, spectroscopic techniques such as fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and single molecule fluorescence spectrosopy, modern electron microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy, and isothermal and differential scanning calorimetry.
Lecture notesCourse material from the individual lecturers wil be made available at the sharepoint website

Link
Prerequisites / NoticeFinished BSc curriculum in Biology, Chemistry or Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences. The course is also adequate for doctoral students with research projects in structural biology, biophysics, biochemistry and chemical biology.
Practical Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
465-0800-00LPractical Work Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS in Medical Physics
O4 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe practical work is designed to train the students in the solution of a specific problem and provides insights in the field of the selected MAS specialization. Tutors propose the subject of the project, the project plan, and the roadmap together with the student, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe practical work is aimed at training the student’s capability to apply and connect specific skills acquired during the MAS specialization program towards the solution of a focused problem.
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0622-00LMeasuring on the Nanometer ScaleW2 credits2GA. Stemmer
AbstractIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ObjectiveIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ContentConventional techniques to analyze nano structures using photons and electrons: light microscopy with dark field and differential interference contrast; scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Interferometric and other techniques to measure distances. Optical traps. Foundations of scanning probe microscopy: tunneling, atomic force, optical near-field. Interactions between specimen and probe. Current trends, including spectroscopy of material parameters.
Lecture notesClass notes and special papers will be distributed.
376-1392-00LMechanobiology: Implications for Development, Regeneration and Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2GA. Ferrari, G. Shivashankar, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractThis course will emphasize the importance of mechanobiology to cell determination and behavior. Its importance to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will also be addressed. Finally, this course will discuss how age and disease adversely alter major mechanosensitive developmental programs.
ObjectiveThis course is designed to illuminate the importance of mechanobiological processes to life as well as to teach good experimental strategies to investigate mechanobiological phenomena.
ContentTypically, cell differentiation is studied under static conditions (cells grown on rigid plastic tissue culture dishes in two-dimensions), an experimental approach that, while simplifying the requirements considerably, is short-sighted in scope. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many tissues modulate their developmental programs to specifically match the mechanical stresses that they will encounter in later life. Examples of known mechanosensitive developmental programs include osteogenesis (bones), chondrogenesis (cartilage), and tendogenesis (tendons). Furthermore, general forms of cell behavior such as migration, extracellular matrix deposition, and complex tissue differentiation are also regulated by mechanical stimuli. Mechanically-regulated cellular processes are thus ubiquitous, ongoing and of great clinical importance.

The overall importance of mechanobiology to humankind is illustrated by the fact that nearly 80% of our entire body mass arises from tissues originating from mechanosensitive developmental programs, principally bones and muscles. Unfortunately, our ability to regenerate mechanosensitive tissue diminishes in later life. As it is estimated that the fraction of the western world population over 65 years of age will double in the next 25 years, an urgency in the global biomedical arena exists to better understand how to optimize complex tissue development under physiologically-relevant mechanical environments for purposes of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureTopical Scientific Manuscripts
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