Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Spatial Development and Infrastructure Systems Master Information
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0031-AALSystems Engineering
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RB. T. Adey
AbstractThis course is designed to familiarize students with formal methods to be used in general situations to solve problems. The content can be applied in the fields of Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Geomatic Engineering and Spatial Planning and Infrastructure Systems.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of the course the students will be able:
-to apply the basic solving problem process,
-to develop basic mathematical models to determine optimal solutions to problems, to
-to develop basic models to be used in decision making, and
-to be able to conduct basic economic and cost-benefit analyses.

All of which will improve their ability to find optimal solutions to problems in the fields of Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Geomatic Engineering and Spatial Planning and Infrastructure Systems.
Content-Introduction
-Problem solving process
-Optimisation models
-Decision making models
-Economic analysis
-Cost-benefit analysis
Lecture notesThe script for the original course is in German. The English material that can be used for the virtual course is:
1 ) Adey, B.T., Hackl, J., Lam, J.C., van Gelder, P., van Erp, N., Prak, P., Heitzler, M., Iosifescu, I., Hurni, L., (2016), Ensuring acceptable levels of infrastructure related risks due to natural hazards with emphasis on stress tests, International Symposium on Infrastructure Asset Management (SIAM), Kyoto, Japan, January 21-22.
2) Blanchard, B.S., and Fabrycky W.J., (2008), Systems Engineering and Analysis, 5th International Edition, Prentice Hall.
3) Revelle, C.S., Whitlach, E.E., and Wright, J.R., (2003), Civil and Environmental Systems Engineering, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall.
101-0414-AALTransport Planning (Transportation I)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe lecture course discusses the basic concepts, approaches and methods of transport planning in both their theoretical and practical contexts.
ObjectiveThe course introduces the basic theories and methods of transport planning.
ContentBasic theoretical links between transport, space and economic development; basic terminology; measurement and observation of travel behaviour; methods of the four stage approach; cost-benefit analysis.
LiteratureOrtuzar, J. de D. and L. Willumsen (2011) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.
101-0515-AALProject Management
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RB. T. Adey
AbstractGeneral introduction to the development, the life cycle and the characteristics of projects. Introduction to, and experience with, the methods and tools to help with the preparation, evaluation, organisation, planning, controlling and completion of projects.
ObjectiveTo introduce the methods and tools of project management. To impart knowledge in the areas of project organisation and structure, project planning, resource management, project controlling and on team leadership and team work.
Content- From strategic planning to implementation (Project phases, goals, constraints, and feasibility)
- Project leadership (Leadership, Teams)
- Project organization (Structure)
- Project planning (Schedule, cost and resource planning)
- Project controlling
- Risk and Quality Management
- Project completion
Lecture notesYes
The transparencies will be available for download from the website at least one week before each class.
Copies of all necessary documents will be distributed at appropriate times.
102-0516-AALEnvironmental Impact Assessment
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractFocus of the course are the method, the process and content of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as well as the legal bases and methods for compiling an environmental impact study (EIS).
Excursions provide a comprehensive view of the EIA.
Using exemplary projects, the process of an EIA will be worked out by the students.
Objective- Understanding the context of spatial planning and environmental protection
- Ability to use central planning instruments and procedures for assessing the environmental impacts and risks of projects
- Ability to apply quantitative methods to assess the environmental impacts and risks of projects
- Knowledge about the process and content of an EIA
- a capacity for critical review of environmental impact assessments
Content- Nominal and functional environmental protection in Switzerland
- Instruments of environmental protection
- Need for coordination between environmental protection and spatial planning
- Environmental Protection and environmental impact assessment
- Legal basis of the EIA
- Procedure of EIA
- Content of the EIA
- Application of the impact analysis
- Monitoring and Controlling
- View regarding the strategic environmental assessment (SEA)
- Excursions to projects obligated under the EIA
Lecture notesNo script. The documents for the lecture can be found for download on the homepage of the Chair of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems.
LiteratureSupplementary literature is available for download on the homepage of the Chair of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems.
103-0233-AALGIS Basics
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Raubal
AbstractFundamentals in geo information technologies: database principles, including modeling of spatial information, geometric and semantic models, topology and metrics;
ObjectiveKnow the fundamentals in geo information technologies for the realization, application and operation of geographic information systems in engineering projects.
ContentModellierung von raumbezogenen Informationen
Geometrische und semantische Modelle
Topologie und Metrik
Raster und Vektormodelle
Datenbanken
Anwendungsbeispiele
LiteratureWorboys, M., & Duckham, M. (2004). GIS - A Computing Perspective (2nd Edition ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
O'Sullivan, D., & Unwin, D. (2010). Geographic Information Analysis (second ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley.
Bill, R. (2016). Grundlagen der Geo-Informationssysteme (6. Auflage ed.): Wichmann.
103-0234-AALGIS II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Raubal
AbstractAdvanced geoinformation technologies: geodatabases advanced; system architectures; mobile GIS; user interfaces; fields and interpolation; data quality, uncertainty, metadata; temporal aspects in GIS.
ObjectiveKnowing advanced topics of geoinformation technologies for the realization, application and operation of geographic information systems in engineering projects.
LiteratureWorboys, M., & Duckham, M. (2004). GIS - A Computing Perspective (2nd Edition ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
103-0313-AALSpatial Planning and Landscape Development
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractThe lecture introduce into the main-features of spatial planning. Attended will be the themes planning as a national responsibility, instruments of spatial planning, techniques for problem-solutions in spatial planning and the swiss concept for regional planning.
Objective- To get to know the interaction between the community and our living space and their resulting conflicts.
- Link theory and practice in spatial planning.
- To get to know instruments and facilities to process problems in spatial planning.
252-0846-AALComputer Science II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RF. Friedrich Wicker, H. Lehner
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms amd
- the knowledge of relational databases and
When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss the paradigm of object oriented programming, typical data structures and algorithms and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.
More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modelling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

T. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest, C. Stein, Introduction to Algorithms , 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).
406-0242-AALAnalysis II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RM. Akveld
AbstractMathematical tools of an engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems, mathematical formulation of problems in science and engineering. Basic mathematical knowledge of an engineer
ContentMulti variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
Literature- James Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole
- William L. Briggs / Lyle Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education (Chapters 10 - 14)
406-0251-AALMathematics I Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RA. Cannas da Silva
AbstractThis course covers mathematical concepts and techniques necessary to model, solve and discuss scientific problems - notably through ordinary differential equations.
ObjectiveMathematics is of ever increasing importance to the Natural Sciences and Engineering. The key is the so-called mathematical modelling cycle, i.e. the translation of problems from outside of mathematics into mathematics, the study of the mathematical problems (often with the help of high level mathematical software packages) and the interpretation of the results in the original environment.

The goal of Mathematics I and II is to provide the mathematical foundations relevant for this paradigm. Differential equations are by far the most important tool for modelling and are therefore a main focus of both of these courses.
Content1. Linear Algebra and Complex Numbers:
systems of linear equations, Gauss-Jordan elimination, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, cartesian and polar forms for complex numbers, complex powers, complex roots, fundamental theorem of algebra.

2. Single-Variable Calculus:
review of differentiation, linearisation, Taylor polynomials, maxima and minima, fundamental theorem of calculus, antiderivative, integration methods, improper integrals.

3. Ordinary Differential Equations:
variation of parameters, separable equations, integration by substitution, systems of linear equations with constant coefficients, 1st and higher order equations, introduction to dynamical systems.
Literature- Bretscher, O.: Linear Algebra with Applications, Pearson Prentice Hall.
- Thomas, G. B.: Thomas' Calculus, Part 1, Pearson Addison-Wesley.
406-0603-AALStochastics (Probability and Statistics)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RM. Kalisch
AbstractIntroduction to basic methods and fundamental concepts of statistics and
probability theory for non-mathematicians. The concepts are presented on
the basis of some descriptive examples. The course will be based on the
book "Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et.al. and on the
book "Introductory Statistics with R" by P. Dalgaard.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to build a solid fundament in probability
and statistics. The student should understand some fundamental concepts and
be able to apply these concepts to applications in the real
world. Furthermore, the student should have a basic knowledge of the
statistical programming language "R". The main topics of the course are:
- Introduction to probability
- Common distributions
- Binomialtest
- z-Test, t-Test
- Regression
ContentFrom "Statistics for research":
Ch 1: The Role of Statistics
Ch 2: Populations, Samples, and Probability Distributions
Ch 3: Binomial Distributions
Ch 6: Sampling Distribution of Averages
Ch 7: Normal Distributions
Ch 8: Student's t Distribution
Ch 9: Distributions of Two Variables [Regression]

From "Introductory Statistics with R":
Ch 1: Basics
Ch 2: Probability and distributions
Ch 3: Descriptive statistics and tables
Ch 4: One- and two-sample tests
Ch 5: Regression and correlation
Literature"Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et. al. (3rd
edition); Print ISBN: 9780471267355; Online ISBN: 9780471477433; DOI:
10.1002/0471477435;
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link

"Introductory Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard; ISBN
978-0-387-79053-4; DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79054-1
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link
103-0414-AALTransport Basics
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RK. W. Axhausen
Abstract
Objective-Introduction to the fundamentals of transportation
-Developing an understanding of the interactions between land use and transportation
-Introduction to the dynamics of transport systems: daily patterns and historical developments
Content-Accessibility
-Equilibrium in transport networks
-Fundamental transport models
-Traffic flow and control
-Vehicle dynamics on rail and road
-Transport modes and supply patterns
-Time tables
103-0357-AALEnvironmental Planning
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Sudau, S.‑E. Rabe
AbstractThe lecture covers tools, methods and procedures of
Landscape and Environmental Planning developed. By means of field trips their implementation will be illustrated.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the various instruments and possibilities for the practical implementation of environmental planning.
Knowledge of the complex interactions of the instruments.
ContentTopics of the Lectures
- forest planning
- inventories
- intervention and compensation
- ecological network
- agricultural policy
- landscape development concepts (LEK)
- parks
- swiss landscape concept
- riverine zone
- natural hazards

Note: there are several non-obligatory field trips as part of the lecture. It is recommended to participate at these to boost the in-depth understanding of the different topics.
Lecture notes- lecture notes concerning the instruments
- handouts
- copies of selected literature

Download: Link
103-0116-AALEcology and Soil Science
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RS. Tobias
AbstractThe main focus of the lecture are the basics of ecology and soil science. Students learn about the interdependence of organisms and environment, resource cycles, ecosystems as well as soil characteristics and genesis. The impact of human behavior on ecosystems and the problems of different land use are covered by the lecture, too.
Objective-getting insights into the basics of ecology
-ability to assess the consequences of spatial planning on ecosystems
-understanding of ecological processes and interdependency
-understanding of function and potential of soil
ContentBasics of Ecology
-definition of ecology, types, habitat, ecosystem, environment
-human influence on ecosystem
-context of landscape and ecology
-ecological context for practical application (e.g. in spatial planning)

Basics of Soil Science
-basic concept and definition of soil, soiltype and essential parameters
-soil water balance (irrigation, drainage)
-soil compaction and erosion
-reclamation and renaturation
-material pollution of soil and remediation approaches
- soil and spatial planning
Lecture notesLecture notes and slides (in German) can be downloaded from the IRL-website: Link
LiteratureLecture notes and slides (in German) can be downloaded from the IRL-website: Link
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