Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Humanities, Social and Political Sciences (General Courses) Information
Further Courses (no SiP-courses)
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0609-08LResearch Seminar in Experimental Social Sciences and Humanities
Does not take place this semester.
If you are interested in presenting in the seminar, please contact Jan Schmitz (Link), and state your preferred date of presentation, the title of the presentation and whether the presentation is a design presentation or a full paper presentation
Z0 credits1SC. Hölscher, R. Schubert
AbstractThe aim of the seminar is to establish a research and networking platform for researchers conducting social science experiments at the ETH and to offer an outlet to present designs for laboratory and field experiments before data collection. Presentations of first study results and working papers are also welcome.
ObjectiveThe research seminar is open to all faculty interested in experimental research in the areas of economics, sociology and psychology. The aim of the seminar is to establish a research and networking platform for researchers conducting experiments at the ETH and to offer an outlet to present designs for laboratory and field experiments before data collection. Presentations of first study results and working papers are also welcome.

Objective: Establish a research and networking platform for researchers conducting experiments at the ETH and to offer an outlet to present designs for laboratory and field experiments before data collection. Presentations of first study results and working papers are also welcome.
851-0000-01LResearch Data Management Summer School Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Only for PhD Students and Postdocs of the ETH Domain
Z2 credits4SM. M. Ziehmer
AbstractResearch Data Management (RDM) is vital for researchers to ensure the proper organisation of research data along the entire life cycle from creation to preservation including their sharing as Open Data (FAIR Data). This ETH Summer School provides an extensive overview on RDM, its principles, its practical implications and on useful tools for early career scientists (PhD students and Postdocs).
ObjectiveStudents are able to

1. explain in detail the basic concepts and components of research data management along the research data life cycle in a national and international context. They understand both their responsibility as individual scientists and their potential future role as early career heads of research groups.

1.1 follow the principles of good scientific practice with respect to data management in general and the content of the ETH Guideline for Research Integrity and the Compliance Guide, in particular.

1.2 define and apply the FAIR Data Principles.

1.3 critically evaluate and improve their own RDM within their current and in future research projects.

1.4 introduce future students and staff to RDM and motivate them to consider it as an integral part of their research.

2. fulfill current requirements regarding Research Data Management (RDM) and Data Management Plans (DMPs) by research funders (i.e. Open Research Data Policy by the SNSF, Rules on Open Access to Research Data in Horizon 2020) in their own research.

3. understand the basics of a DMP and are able to write a research-funder compliant DMP.

4. survey the challenges of Active Research Data Management (ARDM) and are able to properly annotate (metadata), store and back-up research data with appropriate tools for future reuse.

5. critically evaluate and use tools for data sharing and other repositories, including RDM services at ETH Zurich (e.g. ETH Research Data Hub, ETH Research Collection) and international repositories.

5.1 identify appropriate Creative Commons Licenses for their needs.

5.2 assess challenges and benefits of Open Access to publications and make informed decisions on where to publish.

6. understand the challenges of long-term preservation and are able to prepare data for it.
851-0647-00LETH Model United Nations (MUN) Restricted registration - show details Z2 credits1SA. Rom, I. Günther, L. Hensgen
AbstractIn this course students will participate in a Model United Nations (MUN), deepen their knowledge about the United Nations (UN) and the opportunities and challenges the UN system currently faces and strengthen their negotiations and public speaking skills.
Objective• Students get an understanding of how the United Nations works, its history as well as the opportunities and challenges the UN system currently faces.
• Students strengthen their negotiations and public speaking skills
• Students familiarize themselves with a particular country’s priorities and strategies for UN negotiations
ContentIn this course students learn about the UN system, its challenges and opportunities, strengthen their negations and public speaking skills and they get an opportunity to represent the interests of a country at a Model United Nations (MUN). The course consists of five sessions (March 9th/ March 23rd/ April 6th/ April 27th/ May 4th 5.15 PM- 7.00 PM) that include teaching and discussions about the UN system with external experts as well as the preparation and participation in a MUN in Zurich (May 1st- May 3th 2020). Upon request and at students’ own expense they can also attend a MUN in another location.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course consists of five sessions (March 9th/ March 23rd/ April 6th/ April 27th/ May 4th 5.15 PM- 7.00 PM) that include teaching and discussions about the UN system with external experts as well as the preparation and participation in a MUN in Zurich (May 1st- May 3th 2020). Upon request and at students’ own expense they can also attend a MUN in another location.
The course is co-organized with the ETH MUN. Similar courses are offered at UZH, HSG, University of Bern, University of Geneva.
865-0000-07LClimate Change and Development
Only for MAS/CAS in Development and Cooperation students, as well as specialists with at least 24 months of practical experience in international cooperation.

ETH doctoral students working on topics related to poverty reduction in low- and middle income countries may also be admitted.

ETH MA/MSc students apply with a letter of motivation to the NADEL administration office.

Registration only through the NADEL administration office.
Z2 credits3GL. B. Nilsen
AbstractClimate change has taken a lead position on the international development agenda. This course equips participants with a better understanding of the interlinkages between climate change and development, and enables them to integrate climate change considerations into the planning and implementation of development projects.
ObjectiveAfter completing the course, participants will be able to:
• discuss the interconnections between climate change and sustainable development
• explain opportunities and challenges that the current climate agreement presents for developing countries
• understand political, technological, and financial challenges of low-carbon development and how they can be addressed
• explain the complementary nature of mitigation and adaptation and the major strategies used in each
• analyse linkages between climate change adaptation and development planning
• understand the basic steps in defining climate adaptation projects, and recognize the opportunities and limitations of climate models for decision-making.
• engage in an informed dialogue about climate finance, and recognize the main sources of financing to support low carbon and climate-resilient development
• recognize the institutional opportunities and challenges of climate mainstreaming in international humanitarian and development organisations
ContentClimate change and sustainable development
Implications of climate change for developing countries
International and national policy responses and challenges of climate change negotiations
Mitigation and adaptation in resource-poor and vulnerable settings
Climate financing
Trade-offs between mitigation, adaptation and development goals
Climate smart development projects
865-0002-00LMigration: A Challenge for Development Cooperation
Only for MAS/CAS in Development and Cooperation students, as well as specialists with at least 24 months of practical experience in international cooperation.

ETH doctoral students working on topics related to poverty reduction in low- and middle income countries may also be admitted.

ETH MA/MSc students apply with a letter of motivation to the NADEL administration office.

Registration only through the NADEL administration office.
Z1 credit2GK. Schneider, L. Hensgen
AbstractAn estimated 250 million people are currently living outside countries of origin - voluntarily as migrants or involuntarily as refugees. The course explores the role that international cooperation can play in promoting the positive aspects of migration and in reducing the negative consequences.
ObjectiveCourse participants have improved understanding of the following issues:
- Definition of migration concepts and terms, including migrants, refugees, IDPs
- The geography of migration flows
- The evolving concept of “migration and development”
- International organizations and their strategies and activities in terms of migration
ContentToday's migration movements are initiated in the countries of origin through different causes, whether political, social, economic, or natural. Although the concept of migration is negatively connoted for many people, international migration has a positive impact on both the countries of origin and the recipient countries. In addition to the transfer of goods and capital, it can also be understood as part of the increasing globalization process.
865-0056-00LConflict Sensitivity and Peacebuilding – Tools and Approaches
Does not take place this semester.
Only for MAS/CAS in Development and Cooperation students, as well as specialists with at least 24 months of practical experience in international cooperation.

ETH doctoral students working on topics related to poverty reduction in low- and middle income countries may also be admitted.

ETH MA/MSc students apply with a letter of motivation to the NADEL administration office.

Registration only through the NADEL administration office.
Z2 credits3G
AbstractThe course offers an introduction to the subject and contributes to a better understanding of the current debate and policy practices. Participants get an overview of concepts, methodological approaches as well as operational experiences and challenges of the actors in this complex area.
ObjectiveThe course offers an introduction to the subject and contributes to a better understanding of the current debate and policy practices.
865-0066-04LICT4D – Concepts, Strategies and Good Practices
Only for MAS/CAS in Development and Cooperation students, as well as specialists with at least 24 months of practical experience in international cooperation.

ETH doctoral students working on topics related to poverty reduction in low- and middle income countries may also be admitted.

ETH MA/MSc students apply with a letter of motivation to the NADEL administration office.

Registration only through the NADEL administration office.
Z2 credits3GF. Brugger
AbstractInformation and communication technologies (ICTs) represent the deepest technical change experienced in international development. Digital development strategies need to be broader than ICT strategies. This course assesses the role of ICTs in development, discusses the existing evidence on the impact of ICT on development, and introduces key concepts and methods for ICT4D practice and strategy.
ObjectiveInformation and communication technologies (ICTs) represent the fastest and deepest technical change experienced in international development. By now, they affect every development sector – the work of farmers and micro-entrepreneurs, healthcare workers and microfinance institutions, social mobilization and political change. Yet, the ‘digital dividends’ are unevenly distributed and questions of ‘data justice’ in development are largely unexplored. To close the gap, just greater digital adoption will not be enough. Digital development strategies need to be broader than ICT strategies. This course helps to understand the role of ICTs in development, discusses the existing evidence on the impact of ICT on development, and introduces key concepts and methods for ICT4D practice and strategy.
Content• ICTs and development: the conceptual links
• The impact of ICT on development: evidence from research
• Digital revolution and its analog foundations
• Concepts, strategies and components needed for ICT4D to work
• ICT4D and project cycle management
• Good practice in implementing ICT4D
• Emerging technologies and models relevant for ICT-enabled development
052-0724-20LSoziology: Memories of Zurich West Information Restricted registration - show details
There is a limit of 30 students.
Z2 credits2GS. Guinand, C. Schmid
AbstractIn this research seminar, we will investigate the different—and sometimes opposing—tangible and intangible dimensions of memory. Taking the history of Zurich West as a case study, participants will conduct various qualitative methods and present their results in class.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to critically investigate and reconstruct memories of Zurich West by incorporating different actors’ subjective perspectives, as well as discourses on the area. Participants will also collect information on the tangible and intangible transformation processes of Zurich West. The results of the seminar will be presented in the form of a short booklet to be handed out and made available on the department’s website as an e-publication.

A further goal is to introduce participants to qualitative methodological tools. The class is framed to: 1) have students experiment with the challenges of qualitative methods while collecting data in situ; 2) become familiar with new dimensions of qualitative research while simultaneously developing a critical approach to these tools; and 3) devise new perspectives into their personal research project.
ContentThe research seminar engages with the notion of memory, which is intimately entangled with the notion of heritage. Memory can be expressed, on one hand, as all the tangible traces that remain in the built environment, as well as all the intangible dimensions associated with a specific object, environment, or moment. The area of Zurich West is particularly suitable for this exploratory investigation, as it has experienced different layers of transformations over the past several decades. It was the core industrial area for the greater Zurich region with varied forms of industrial production such as machines, turbines, soap, beer, and logistical facilities until the 1980s. It then turned into a meeting place for an alternative cultural milieu, with all sorts of venues and high hopes for innovative projects in regard to its future development. However, it then quickly turned into a “trendy” and luxury neighbourhood at the end of the 1990s, when public authorities designated it for real estate development.

In the research seminar this urban trajectory will be explored through the following aspects:
Where can memory be found? How is it expressed in the built environment? What do we know and learn? Are there missing elements? What is hidden? Is there a such a thing as “ordinary” memory? What is institutional (official) and what is not? What are the attributes of memory? Are there opposing memories? Should we speak of memories?

We will attempt to answer these questions by first looking at archival materials, undertaking photographic surveys, and then by conducting qualitative interviews with (former) residents, (former) users and local stakeholders—sometimes using the photo-elicitation technique.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureA syllabus with central texts will be handed out at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be held in English. Participants must be able to speak and write in English.
The course is restricted to 30 students. Please send a motivation letter to Link until February 2020.
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