Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

High-Energy Physics (Joint Master with EP Paris) Information
Core Subjects
Core Courses in Theoretical Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0844-00LQuantum Field Theory II
UZH students are not allowed to register this course unit at ETH. They must book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
W10 credits3V + 2UG. Isidori
AbstractThe subject of the course is modern applications of quantum field theory with emphasis on the quantization of non-abelian gauge theories.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to lay down the path integral formulation of quantum field theories and in particular to provide a solid basis for the study of non-abelian gauge theories and of the Standard Model
ContentThe following topics will be covered:
- path integral quantization
- non-abelian gauge theories and their quantization
- systematics of renormalization, including BRST symmetries,
Slavnov-Taylor Identities and the Callan Symanzik equation
- the Goldstone theorem and the Higgs mechanism
- gauge theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking and
their quantization
- renormalization of spontaneously broken gauge theories and
quantum effective actions
LiteratureM.E. Peskin and D.V. Schroeder, "An introduction to Quantum Field Theory", Perseus (1995).
S. Pokorski, "Gauge Field Theories" (2nd Edition), Cambridge Univ. Press (2000)
P. Ramond, "Field Theory: A Modern Primer" (2nd Edition), Westview Press (1990)
S. Weinberg, "The Quantum Theory of Fields" (Volume 2), CUP (1996).
Core Courses in Experimental Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0702-00LPhenomenology of Particle Physics IIW10 credits3V + 2UA. Rubbia, P. Crivelli
AbstractIn PPP II the standard model of particle physics will be developed from the point of view of gauge invariance. The example of QED will introduce the essential concepts. Then we will treat both strong and electroweak interactions. Important examples like deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering, e+e- -> fermion antifermion, and weak particle decays will be calculated in detail.
Objective
Electives
Optional Subjects in Physics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0714-00LAstro-Particle Physics IIW6 credits2V + 1UA. Biland
AbstractThis lecture focuses on the neutral components of the cosmic rays as well as on several aspects of Dark Matter. Main topics will be very-high energy astronomy and neutrino astronomy.
ObjectiveStudents know experimental methods to measure neutrinos as well as high energy and very high energy photons from extraterrestrial sources. They are aware of the historical development and the current state of the field, including major theories. Additionally, they understand experimental evidences about the existence of Dark Matter and selected Dark Matter theories.
Contenta) short repetition about 'charged cosmic rays' (1st semester)
b) High Energy (HE) and Very-High Energy (VHE) Astronomy:
- ongoing and near-future detectors for (V)HE gamma-rays
- possible production mechanisms for (V)HE gamma-rays
- galactic sources: supernova remnants, pulsar-wind nebulae, micro-quasars, etc.
- extragalactic sources: active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, galaxy clusters, etc.
- the gamma-ray horizon and it's cosmological relevance
c) Neutrino Astronomy:
- atmospheric, solar, extrasolar and cosmological neutrinos
- actual results and near-future experiments
d) Dark Matter:
- evidence for existence of non-barionic matter
- Dark Matter models (mainly Supersymmetry)
- actual and near-future experiments for direct and indirect Dark Matter searches
Lecture notesSee: Link
LiteratureSee: Link
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course can be attended independent of Astro-Particle Physics I.
402-0738-00LStatistical Methods and Analysis Techniques in Experimental PhysicsW10 credits5GM. Donegà, C. Grab
AbstractThis lecture gives an introduction to the statistical methods and the various analysis techniques applied in experimental particle physics. The exercises treat problems of general statistical topics; they also include hands-on analysis projects, where students perform independent analyses on their computer, based on real data from actual particle physics experiments.
ObjectiveStudents will learn the most important statistical methods used in experimental particle physics. They will acquire the necessary skills to analyse large data records in a statistically correct manner. Learning how to present scientific results in a professional manner and how to discuss them.
ContentTopics include:
- modern methods of statistical data analysis
- probability distributions, error analysis, simulation methos, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, setting limits and introduction to multivariate methods.
- most examples are taken from particle physics.

Methodology:
- lectures about the statistical topics;
- common discussions of examples;
- exercises: specific exercises to practise the topics of the lectures;
- all students perform statistical calculations on (their) computers;
- students complete a full data analysis in teams (of two) over the second half of the course, using real data taken from particle physics experiments;
- at the end of the course, the students present their analysis results in a scientific presentation;
- all students are directly tutored by assistants in the classroom.
Lecture notes- Copies of all lectures are available on the web-site of the course.
- A scriptum of the lectures is also available to all students of the course.
Literature1) Statistics: A guide to the use of statistical medhods in the Physical Sciences, R.J.Barlow; Wiley Verlag .
2) J Statistical data analysis, G. Cowan, Oxford University Press; ISBN: 0198501552.
3) Statistische und numerische Methoden der Datenanalyse, V.Blobel und E.Lohrmann, Teubner Studienbuecher Verlag.
4) Data Analysis, a Bayesian Tutorial, D.S.Sivia with J.Skilling,
Oxford Science Publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowlege of nuclear and particle physics are prerequisites.
402-0895-00LThe Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions
Special Students UZH must book the module PHY563 directly at UZH.
W6 credits2V + 1UA. Lazopoulos
AbstractTopics to be covered:
A) Electroweak Theory
- Spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism
- The electroweak Standard Model Lagrangian
- The role of the Higgs and the Goldstone bosons
B) Flavour Physics
-The flavour sector of the Standard Model
-The neutral kaon system and CP violation
C) Neutrino oscillations
D) Precision tests of the electroweak Standard Model
ObjectiveAn introduction to modern theoretical particle physics
LiteratureAs described in the entity: Lernmaterialien
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of Quantum Field Theory I is required.
Parallel following of Quantum Field Theory II is recommended.
402-0886-00LIntroduction to Quantum Chromodynamics
Special Students UZH must book the module PHY564 directly at UZH.
W6 credits2V + 1UV. Del Duca
AbstractIntroduction to the theoretical aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of strong interactions.
ObjectiveStudents that complete the course will be able to understand the fundamentals of QCD, to quantitatively discuss the ultraviolet and infrared behaviour of the theory, to perform simple calculations and to understand modern publications on this research field.
ContentThe following topics will be covered:
- QCD Lagrangian and gauge invariance
- Ultraviolet behaviour of QCD: renormalisation, the beta function, running coupling and asymptotic freedom
- Infrared behaviour of QCD: soft and collinear divergences, coherence, jets
- Parton Model, factorisation and Deeply Inelastic Scattering
- Parton evolution in QCD: the DGLAP equations
- QCD at hadron colliders
LiteratureWill be provided at the Moodle site for the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeQFT I : A working knowledge of Quantum Field Theory I, at the level of easily performing tree-level computations with Feynman diagrams given the Feynman rules, is assumed.
402-0703-00LPhenomenology of Physics Beyond the Standard ModelW6 credits2V + 1UM. Spira, M. G. Ratti
AbstractAfter a short introduction to the theoretical foundations and experimental tests of the standard model, supersymmetry, leptoquarks, and extra dimensions will be treated among other topics. Thereby the phenomenological aspect, i. e., the search for new particles and interactions at existing and future particle accelerators will play a significant role.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is the introduction into several theoretical concepts that provide solutions for the open questions of the Standard Model of particle physics and thus lead to physics beyond the Standard Model.

Besides the theoretical concepts the phenomenological aspect plays a role, i.e. the search for new particles and interactions at the existing and future particle accelerators plays a crucial role.
Contentsee home page: Link
Lecture notessee home page: Link
Prerequisites / NoticeWill be taught in German only if all students understand German.
402-0394-00LTheoretical Cosmology
UZH students are not allowed to register this course unit at ETH. They must book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
W10 credits4V + 2UL. M. Mayer, J. Yoo
AbstractThis is the second of a two course series which starts with "General Relativity" and continues in the spring with "Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology", where the focus will be on applying general relativity to cosmology as well as developing the modern theory of structure formation in a cold dark matter Universe.
ObjectiveLearning the fundamentals of modern physical cosmology. This
entails understanding the physical principles behind the description
of the homogeneous Universe on large scales in the first part of the
course, and moving on to the inhomogeneous Universe model where
perturbation theory is used to study the development of structure
through gravitational instability in the second part of the course.
Modern notions of dark matter and dark energy will also be introduced and discussed.
ContentThe course will cover the following topics:
- Homogeneous cosmology
- Thermal history of the universe, recombination, baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis
- Dark matter and Dark Energy
- Inflation
- Perturbation theory: Relativistic and Newtonian
- Model of structure formation and initial conditions from Inflation
- Cosmic microwave background anisotropies
- Spherical collapse and galaxy formation
- Large scale structure and cosmological probes
LiteratureSuggested textbooks:
H.Mo, F. Van den Bosch, S. White: Galaxy Formation and Evolution
S. Carroll: Space-Time and Geometry: An Introduction to General Relativity
S. Dodelson: Modern Cosmology
Secondary textbooks:
S. Weinberg: Gravitation and Cosmology
V. Mukhanov: Physical Foundations of Cosmology
E. W. Kolb and M. S. Turner: The Early Universe
N. Straumann: General relativity with applications to astrophysics
A. Liddle and D. Lyth: Cosmological Inflation and Large Scale Structure
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of General Relativity is recommended.
402-0883-63LSymmetries in PhysicsW6 credits2V + 1UN. Beisert
AbstractThe course gives an introduction to symmetry groups in physics. It explains the relevant mathematical background (finite groups, Lie groups and algebras as well as their representations), and illustrates their important role in modern physics.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to give a self-contained introduction into finite group theory as well as Lie theory from a physicists point of view. Abstract mathematical constructions will be illustrated with examples from physics.
Contentsymmetries in two and three dimensions, groups and representations, finite group theory, point and space groups, structure of simple Lie algebras, finite-dimensional representations; advanced topics such as: representations of SU(N), classification of simple Lie algebras, conformal symmetry
402-0848-00LAdvanced Field Theory Information
Special Students UZH must book the module PHY572 directly at UZH.
W6 credits2V + 1UR. Chitra
AbstractThis course will introduce students to concepts and methods in field theory
which are used to study topics both in high energy physics and quantum condensed matter theory.
ObjectiveThe course aims to illustrate the deep similarities in the field theory methodologies used in both fields. The students will learn techniques commonly used to study interacting quantum systems and see corresponding applications
both in high energy and condensed matter physics.

The course will show how continuum field theories can be used to describe a wide variety of collective phenomena in condensed matter systems, like magnetism and spin-charge separation in one dimensional electronic systems. The same field theory techniques are used in high energy physics to treat light bound states in quantum chromodynamics (pions), to describe non-perturbative contributions to the vacuum state of quantum chromodynamics, or quantum tunneling effects that might have catalyzed baryogenesis in the early universe.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Quantum Field Theory I
Recommended: Statistical Physics

We will use a light version of the Euclidean path integrals in this course and will strive to keep this course accessible independently of QFTII.

Students interested in more in-depth formulations of the path integral formalism and related topics can also attend QFT II in parallel.
402-0778-00LParticle Accelerator Physics and Modeling IIW6 credits2V + 1UA. Adelmann
AbstractThe effect of nonlinearities on the beam dynamics of charged particles will be discussed. For the nonlinear beam transport, Lie-Methods in combination with differential algebra (DA) and truncated power series (TPS) will be introduced. In the second part we will discuss surrogate model construction for such non-linear dynamical systems using neural networks and polynomial chaos expansion.
ObjectiveModels for nonlinear beam dynamics can be applied to new or existing particle accelerators.
You create Python based surrogate models of dynamical systems, such as charged particle accelerators using Keras and Tensorflow.
Content- Symplectic Maps and Higher Order Beam Dynamics
- Taylor Modells and Differential Algebra
- Lie Methods
- Normal Forms
- Surrogate Models for dynamical systems
- Surrogate model based neural networks
- Surrogate model based polynomial chaos
- Uncertanty quantification of dynamical systems
Lecture notesLecture notes
Literature* Modern Map Methods in Particle Beam Physics
M. Berz (Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally Particle Accelerator Physics and Modelling 1 (PAM-1), however at the beginning of the semester, a crash course is offered introducing the minimum level of particle accelerator modeling needed to follow. This lecture is also suited for PhD. Students.
402-0726-12LPhysics of Exotic AtomsW6 credits2V + 1UP. Crivelli, A. Soter
AbstractIn this course, we will review the status of physics with exotic atoms including the new exciting advances such as anti-hydrogen 1S-2S spectroscopy and measurements of the hyperfine splitting and the puzzling results of the muonic-hydrogen experiment for the determination of the proton charge radius.
ObjectiveThe course will give an introduction on the physics of exotic atoms covering both theoretical and experimental aspects. The focus will be set on the systems which are currently a subject of research in Switzerland: positronium at ETHZ, anti-hydrogen at CERN and muonium, muonic-H and muonic-He at PSI. The course will enable the students to follow recent publications in this field.
ContentReview of the theory of hydrogen and hydrogen-like atoms
Interaction of atoms with radiation
Hyperfine splitting theory and experiments: Positronium (Ps),
Muonium (Mu) and anti-hydrogen (Hbar)
High precision spectroscopy: Ps, Mu and Hbar
Lamb shift in muonic-H and muonic-He- the proton radius puzzle
Weak and strong interaction tests with exotic atoms
Anti-matter and gravitation
Applications of antimatter
Lecture notesscript
LiteraturePrecision physics of simple atoms and molecules, Savely G. Karshenboim, Springer 2008

Proceedings of the International Conference on Exotic Atoms (EXA 2008) and the 9th International Conference on Low Energy Antiproton Physics (LEAP 2008) held in Vienna, Austria, 15-19 September 2008 (PART I/II), Hyperfine Interactions, Volume 193, Numbers 1-3 / September 2009

Laser Spectroscopy: Vol. 1 Basic Principles Vol. 2 Experimental Techniques von Wolfgang Demtröder von Springer Berlin Heidelberg 2008
Optional Subjects in Mathematics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-3532-08LDifferential Geometry II Information W10 credits4V + 1UU. Lang
AbstractIntroduction to Riemannian geometry in combination with some elements of modern metric geometry. Contents: Riemannian manifolds, Levi-Civita connection, geodesics, Hopf-Rinow Theorem, curvature, second fundamental form, Riemannian submersions and coverings, Hadamard-Cartan Theorem, triangle and volume comparison, relations between curvature and topology, spaces of Riemannian manifolds.
ObjectiveLearn the basics of Riemannian geometry and some elements of modern metric geometry.
Literature- M. P. do Carmo, Riemannian Geometry, Birkhäuser 1992
- S. Gallot, D. Hulin, J. Lafontaine, Riemannian Geometry, Springer 2004
- B. O'Neill, Semi-Riemannian Geometry, With Applications to Relativity, Academic Press 1983
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite is a working knowledge of elementary differential geometry (curves and surfaces in Euclidean space), differentiable manifolds, and differential forms.
401-3462-00LFunctional Analysis II Information W10 credits4V + 1UM. Struwe
AbstractSobolev spaces, weak solutions of elliptic boundary value problems, elliptic regularity
ObjectiveAcquiring the methods for solving elliptic boundary value problems, Sobolev spaces, Schauder estimates
Lecture notesFunktionalanalysis II, Michael Struwe
LiteratureFunktionalanalysis II, Michael Struwe

Functional Analysis, Spectral Theory and Applications.
Manfred Einsiedler and Thomas Ward, GTM Springer 2017
Prerequisites / NoticeFunctional Analysis I and a solid background in measure theory, Lebesgue integration and L^p spaces.
Proseminars and Semester Papers
To organise a semester project take contact with one of the instructors.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0717-MSLParticle Physics at CERN Information Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18PF. Nessi-Tedaldi, W. Lustermann
AbstractDuring the semester break participating students stay for 4 weeks at CERN and perform experimental work relevant to our particle physics projects. Dates to be agreed upon.
ObjectiveStudents learn the needed skills to, and perform a small particle physics experiment: setup, problem solving, data taking, analysis, interpretation and presentation in a written report of publication quality.
ContentDetailed information in: Link
Prerequisites / NoticeLanguage of instruction: English or German
402-0719-MSLParticle Physics at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute) Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18PC. Grab
AbstractDuring semester breaks in Summer 6-12 students stay for 3 weeks at PSI and participate in a hands-on course on experimental particle physics. A small real experiment is performed in common, including apparatus design, construction, running and data analysis. The course includes some lectures, but the focus lies on the practical aspects of experimenting.
ObjectiveStudents learn all the different steps it takes to perform a complete particle physics experiment in a small team. They acquire skills to do this themselves in the team, including design, construction, data taking and data analysis.
402-0210-MSLProseminar Theoretical Physics Information Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
W9 credits4SSupervisors
AbstractA guided self-study of original papers and of advanced textbooks in theoretical physics. Within the general topic, determined each semester, participants give a presentation on a particular subject and deliver a written report.
Objective
402-0217-MSLSemester Project in Theoretical Physics Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ASupervisors
AbstractThis course unit is an alternative if no suitable "Proseminar Theoretical Physics" is available of if the proseminar is already overbooked.
Objective
402-0215-MSLExperimental Semester Project in Physics Information Restricted registration - show details W9 credits18ASupervisors
AbstractThe aim of the project is to give the student experience in working in a research environment, carrying out physics experiments, analysing and interpreting the resulting data.
Objective
GESS Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
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