Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2020

Science, Technology, and Policy Master Information
Naturwissenschaftlich-technische Ergänzung (NUR für Reglement 2019)
Mobilität und Energie
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0226-00LEnergy and Transport FuturesW4 KP3GK. Boulouchos, P. J. de Haan van der Weg, G. Georges
KurzbeschreibungThe course teaches to view local energy solutions as part of the larger energy system. Because it powers all sectors, local changes can have consequences reaching well beyond one sector. While we explore all sectors, we put a particular emphasis on mobility and its unique challenges. We not only cover engineering aspects, but also policymaking and behavioral economics.
LernzielThe main objectives of this lecture are:
(i) Systemic view on the Energy Sytem with emphasis on Transport Applications
(ii) Students can assess the reduction of energy demand (or greenhouse gas emissions) of sectoral solutions.
(iii) Students understand the advantages and disadvantages of technology options in mobility
(iv) Students know policy tools to affect change in mobility, and understand the rebound effect.
InhaltThe course describes the role of energy system plays for the well-being of modern societies, and drafts a future energy system based on renewable energy sources, able to meet the demands of the sectors building, industry and transport. The projected Swiss energy system is used as an example. Students learn how all sectoral solutions feedback on the whole system and how sector coupling could lead to optimal transformation paths. The course then focuses on the history, status quo and technical potentials of the transport sector. Policy mixes to reduce energy demand and CO2 emissions from transport are introduced. Both direct and indirect effects of different policy types are discussed. Concepts from behavioral economics (car purchase behavior and rebound effects) are presented.

Preliminary schedule:
Block 1. Energy technologies and policies.
Climate, Environment, Security of Supply.Technology options and policies in power generation, building and industrial sectors .
Block 2. Transport technologies.
Technology options in mobility and their physical aspects
Block 3. Transport policies
Regulation, policy tools and technological potential to affect change in mobility
Block 4. Energy and Transport Futures
Closing loop across all sectors. Sector-coupling.
Skriptt.b.d.
Literaturt.b.d.
363-0514-00LEnergy Economics and Policy
It is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example,"Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
W3 KP2GM. Filippini
KurzbeschreibungAn introduction to energy economics and policy that covers the following topics: energy demand, economics of energy efficiency, investments and cost analysis, energy markets (fossil fuels,electricity and renewable energy sources), market failures and behavioral anomalies, market-based and non-market based energy policy instruments and regulation of energy industries.
LernzielThe students will develop the understanding of economic principles and tools necessary to analyze energy issues and to formulate energy policy instruments. Emphasis will be put on empirical analysis of energy demand and supply, market failures, behavioral anomalies, energy policy instruments, investments in power plants and in energy efficiency technologies and the reform of the electric power sector.
InhaltThe course provides an introduction to energy economics principles and policy applications. The first part of the course will introduce the microeconomic foundation of energy demand and supply as well as market failures and behavioral anomalies. In a second part, we introduce the concept of investment analysis (such as the NPV), in the context of energy efficient investments. In the last part, we use the previously introduced concepts to analyze energy policies: from a government perspective, we discuss the mechanisms and implications of market oriented and non-market oriented policy instruments as well as the regulation of energy industries.

Throughout the entire class, we combine the course material with insights from current research in energy economics. This combination will enable students to understand standard scientific literature in the field of energy economics. Moreover, the class aims to show students how to put real life situations in the energy sector in the context of insights from energy economics.

During the first part of the course a set of environmental and resource economics tools will be given to students through lectures. The applied nature of the course is achieved by discussing several papers in a seminar. To this respect, students are required to work in groups in order to prepare a presentation of a paper.

The evaluation policy is designed to verify the knowledge acquired by students during the course. For this purpose, a short group presentation will be graded. At the end of the course there will be a written exam covering the topics of the course. The final grade is obtained by averaging the presentation (20%) and the final exam (80%).
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesIt is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example, "Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
363-0543-00LAgent-Based Modelling of Social Systems Information W3 KP2V + 1UF. Schweitzer
KurzbeschreibungAgent-based modeling is introduced as a bottom-up approach to understand the complex dynamics of social systems. The course is based on formal models of agents and their interactions. Computer simulations using Python allow the quantitative analysis of a wide range of social phenomena, e.g. cooperation and competition, opinion dynamics, spatial interactions and behaviour in social networks.
LernzielA successful participant of this course is able to
- understand the rationale of agent-based models of social systems
- understand the relation between rules implemented at the individual level and the emerging behavior at the global level
- learn to choose appropriate model classes to characterize different social systems
- grasp the influence of agent heterogeneity on the model output
- efficiently implement agent-based models using Python and visualize the output
InhaltThis full-featured course on agent-based modeling (ABM) allows participants with no prior expertise to understand concepts, methods and tools of ABM, to apply them in their master or doctoral thesis. We focus on a formal description of agents and their interactions, to allow for a suitable implementation in computer simulations. Given certain rules for the agents, we are interested to model their collective dynamics on the systemic level.

Agent-based modeling is introduced as a bottom-up approach to understand the complex dynamics of social systems.
Agents represent the basic constituents of such systems. The are described by internal states or degrees of freedom (opinions, strategies, etc.), the ability to perceive and change their environment, and the ability to interact with other agents. Their individual (microscopic) actions and interactions with other agents, result in macroscopic (collective, system) dynamics with emergent properties, which we want to understand and to analyze.

The course is structured in three main parts. The first two parts introduce two main agent concepts - Boolean agents and Brownian agents, which differ in how the internal dynamics of agents is represented. Boolean agents are characterized by binary internal states, e.g. yes/no opinion, while Brownian agents can have a continuous spectrum of internal states, e.g. preferences and attitudes. The last part introduces models in which agents interact in physical space, e.g. migrate or move collectively.

Throughout the course, we will discuss a wide variety of application areas, such as:
- opinion dynamics and social influence,
- cooperation and competition,
- online social networks,
- systemic risk
- emotional influence and communication
- swarming behavior
- spatial competition

While the lectures focus on the theoretical foundations of agent-based modeling, weekly exercise classes provide practical skills. Using the Python programming language, the participants implement agent-based models in guided and in self-chosen projects, which they present and jointly discuss.
SkriptThe lecture slides will be available on the Moodle platform, for registered students only.
LiteraturSee handouts. Specific literature is provided for download, for registered students only.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesParticipants of the course should have some background in mathematics and an interest in formal modeling and in computer simulations, and should be motivated to learn about social systems from a quantitative perspective.

Prior knowledge of Python is not necessary.

Self-study tasks are provided as home work for small teams (2-4 members).
Weekly exercises (45 min) are used to discuss the solutions and guide the students.

The examination will account for 70% of the grade and will be conducted electronically. The "closed book" rule applies: no books, no summaries, no lecture materials. The exam questions and answers will be only in English. The use of a paper-based dictionary is permitted.
The group project to be handed in at the beginning of July will count 30% to the final grade.
364-0576-00LAdvanced Sustainability Economics Information
PhD course, open for MSc students
W3 KP3GL. Bretschger
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers current resource and sustainability economics, including ethical foundations of sustainability, intertemporal optimisation in capital-resource economies, sustainable use of non-renewable and renewable resources, pollution dynamics, population growth, and sectoral heterogeneity. A final part is on empirical contributions, e.g. the resource curse, energy prices, and the EKC.
LernzielUnderstanding of the current issues and economic methods in sustainability research; ability to solve typical problems like the calculation of the growth rate under environmental restriction with the help of appropriate model equations.
103-0448-01LTransformation of Urban Landscapes
Nur für Master-Studierende, ansonsten ist eine Spezialbewilligung des Dozierenden notwendig.
W3 KP2GJ. Van Wezemael, A. Gonzalez Martinez
KurzbeschreibungThe lecture course addresses the transformation of urban landscapes towards sustainable inward development. The course reconnects two largely separated complexity approaches in «spatial planning» and «urban sciences» as a basic framework to look at a number of spatial systems considering economic, political, and cultural factors. Focus lies on participation and interaction of students in groups.
Lernziel- Understand cities as complex adaptive systems
- Understand planning in a complex context and planning competitions as decision-making
- Seeing cities through big data and understand (Urban) Governance as self-organization
- Learn Design-Thinking methods for solving problems of inward development
- Practice presentation skills
- Practice argumentation and reflection skills by writing critiques
- Practice writing skills in a small project
- Practice teamwork
InhaltStarting point and red thread of the lecture course is the transformation of urban landscapes as we can see for example across the Swiss Mittelland - but in fact also globally. The lecture course presents a theoretical foundation to see cities as complex systems. On this basis it addresses practical questions as well as the complex interplay of economic, political or spatial systems.

While cities and their planning were always complex the new era of globalization exposed and brought to the fore this complexity. It created a situation that the complexity of cities can no longer be ignored. The reason behind this is the networking of hitherto rather isolated places and systems across scales on the basis of Information and Communication Technologies. «Parts» of the world still look pretty much the same but we have networked them and made them strongly interdependent. This networking fuels processes of self-organization. In this view regions emerge from a multitude of relational networks of varying geographical reach and they display intrinsic timescales at which problems develop. In such a context, an increasing number of planning problems remain unaffected by either «command-and-control» approaches or instruments of spatial development that are one-sidedly infrastructure- or land-use orientated. In fact, they urge for novel, more open and more bottom-up assembling modes of governance and a «smart» focus on how space is actually used. Thus, in order to be effective, spatial planning and governance must be reconceptualised based on a complexity understanding of cities and regions, considering self-organizing and participatory approaches and the increasingly available wealth of data.
LiteraturA reader with original papers will be provided via the ILIAS system.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesOnly for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
151-0228-00LManagement of Air Transport (Aviation II)W4 KP3GP. Wild
KurzbeschreibungProviding an overview in management, planning, processes and operations in air transport, the lecture shall enable students to operate and lead a unit within that industry. In addition, the modules provide a good understanding for other transport modes and are a sort of "Mini MBA" (topics see below). Ideally, students complete first "Basics in Air Transport" yet there is no requirement for it.
LernzielAfter completion of the course, they shall be familiar with tasks, processes and interactions and have the ability to understand implications of developments in the airlines industry and its environment. This shall enable them to work within the air transport industry.
InhaltWeekly: 1h independent preparation; 2h lectures and 1 h training with an expert in the respective field
Overall concept: This lecture build on the content of the lecture "Basics in Air Transport" (101-0499-00L) and provides deeper insights into the airline industry.
Content: Strategy, Alliances & Joint Ventures, Negotiations with Stakeholder, Environmental Protection, Safety & Risk Management, Airline Economics, Network Management, Revenue Management & Pricing, Sales & Distribution, Airline Marketing, Scheduling & Slot Management, Fleet Management & Leasing, Continuing Airworthiness Management, Supply Chain Management, Operational Steering
SkriptNo offical lecture notes. Lecturers' slides will be made available
LiteraturLiterature will be provided by the lecturers respective there will be additional Information upon registration
151-0206-00LEnergy Systems and Power EngineeringW4 KP2V + 2UR. S. Abhari, A. Steinfeld
KurzbeschreibungIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
LernzielIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
InhaltWorld primary energy resources and use: fossil fuels, renewable energies, nuclear energy; present situation, trends, and future developments. Sustainable energy system and environmental impact of energy conversion and use: energy, economy and society. Electric power and the electricity economy worldwide and in Switzerland; production, consumption, alternatives. The electric power distribution system. Renewable energy and power: available techniques and their potential. Cost of electricity. Conventional power plants and their cycles; state-of-the -art and advanced cycles. Combined cycles and cogeneration; environmental benefits. Solar thermal power generation and solar photovoltaics. Hydrogen as energy carrier. Fuel cells: characteristics, fuel reforming and combined cycles. Nuclear power plant technology.
SkriptVorlesungsunterlagen werden verteilt
529-0191-01LElectrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage TechnologiesW4 KP3GL. Gubler, E. Fabbri, J. Herranz Salañer
KurzbeschreibungThe course provides an introduction to the principles and applications of electrochemical energy conversion (e.g. fuel cells) and storage (e.g. batteries) technologies in the broader context of a renewable energy system.
LernzielStudents will discover the importance of electrochemical energy conversion and storage in energy systems of today and the future, specifically in the framework of renewable energy scenarios. Basics and key features of electrochemical devices will be discussed, and applications in the context of the overall energy system will be highlighted with focus on future mobility technologies and grid-scale energy storage. Finally, the role of (electro)chemical processes in power-to-X and deep decarbonization concepts will be elaborated.
InhaltOverview of energy utilization: past, present and future, globally and locally; today’s and future challenges for the energy system; climate changes; renewable energy scenarios; introduction to electrochemistry; electrochemical devices, basics and their applications: batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, flow batteries, supercapacitors, chemical energy carriers: hydrogen & synthetic natural gas; electromobility; grid-scale energy storage, power-to-gas, power-to-X and deep decarbonization, techno-economics and life cycle analysis.
Skriptall lecture materials will be available for download on the course website.
Literatur- M. Sterner, I. Stadler (Eds.): Handbook of Energy Storage (Springer, 2019).
- C.H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich; Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH (2007).
- T.F. Fuller, J.N. Harb: Electrochemical Engineering, Wiley (2018)
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesBasic physical chemistry background required, prior knowledge of electrochemistry basics desired.
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based ResourcesW4 KP3GM. Mazzotti, L. Bretschger, N. Gruber, C. Müller, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
KurzbeschreibungCarbon-based resources (coal, oil, gas): origin, production, processing, resource economics. Climate change: science, policies. CCS systems: CO2 capture in power/industrial plants, CO2 transport and storage. Besides technical details, economical, legal and societal aspects are considered (e.g. electricity markets, barriers to deployment).
LernzielThe goal of the lecture is to introduce carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far and the current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing and economics of carbon-based resources, and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with important technical and non-technical issues related to use of carbon resources, climate change, and CCS as a transitional mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion. At the end of the semester a group project is planned.
InhaltBoth the Swiss and the European energy system face a number of significant challenges over the coming decades. The major concerns are the security and economy of energy supply and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels will continue to satisfy the largest part of the energy demand in the medium term for Europe, and they could become part of the Swiss energy portfolio due to the planned phase out of nuclear power. Carbon capture and storage is considered an important option for the decarbonization of the power sector and it is the only way to reduce emissions in CO2 intensive industrial plants (e.g. cement- and steel production).
Building on the previously offered class "Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS)", we have added two specific topics: 1) the industry of carbon-based resources, i.e. what is upstream of the CCS value chain, and 2) the science of climate change, i.e. why and how CO2 emissions are a problem.
The course is devided into four parts:
I) The first part will be dedicated to the origin, production, and processing of conventional as well as of unconventional carbon-based resources.
II) The second part will comprise two lectures from experts in the field of climate change sciences and resource economics.
III) The third part will explain the technical details of CO2 capture (current and future options) as well as of CO2 storage and utilization options, taking again also economical, legal, and sociatel aspects into consideration.
IV) The fourth part will comprise two lectures from industry experts, one with focus on electricity markets, the other on the experiences made with CCS technologies in the industry.
Throughout the class, time will be allocated to work on a number of tasks related to the theory, individually, in groups, or in plenum. Moreover, the students will apply the theoretical knowledge acquired during the course in a case study covering all the topics.
SkriptPower Point slides and distributed handouts
LiteraturIPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018.
Link

IPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014. Link

IPCC Special Report on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, 2005. Link

The Global Status of CCS: 2014. Published by the Global CCS Institute, Nov 2014.
Link
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
  •  Seite  1  von  1