Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Chemical and Bioengineering Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2005)
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0109-00LTurbulent FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractContents
- Laminar and turbulent flows, instability and origin of turbulence - Statistical description: averaging, turbulent energy, dissipation, closure problem - Scalings. Homogeneous isotropic turbulence, correlations, Fourier representation, energy spectrum - Free turbulence: wake, jet, mixing layer - Wall turbulence: Channel and boundary layer - Computation and modelling of turbulent flows
ObjectiveBasic physical phenomena of turbulent flows, quantitative and statistical description, basic and averaged equations, principles of turbulent flow computation and elements of turbulence modelling
Content- Properties of laminar, transitional and turbulent flows.
- Origin and control of turbulence. Instability and transition.
- Statistical description, averaging, equations for mean and fluctuating quantities, closure problem.
- Scalings, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, energy spectrum.
- Turbulent free shear flows. Jet, wake, mixing layer.
- Wall-bounded turbulent flows.
- Turbulent flow computation and modeling.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available
LiteratureS.B. Pope, Turbulent Flows, Cambridge University Press, 2000
151-0951-00LProcess Design and SafetyW4 credits2V + 1UF. Trachsel, C. Hutter
AbstractThe lecture Process Design and Saftey deals with the fundamentals of project management, scale-up, dimensioning and safety of chemical process equipment and plants.
ObjectiveThe objective of the lecture is to expound the engineering design approach of important elements in chemical plant design.
ContentFundamentals in Chemical engineering Design;
Project Management,
Cost estimate,
Materials and Corrosion,
Piping and Armatures,
Pumps,
Reactors and Scale-up,
Safety of chemical processes,
Patents
Lecture notesThe lecture slides will be distributed.
LiteratureCoulson and Richardson's: Chemical Engineering , Vol 6: Chemical Engineering Design, (1996)
Prerequisites / NoticeA 1-day excursion including a visit of a chemical plant will be part of the lecture.
151-0927-00LRate-Controlled Separations in Fine ChemistryW6 credits3V + 1UM. Mazzotti
AbstractThe students are supposed to obtain detailed insight into the fundamentals of separation processes that are frequently applied in modern life sicence processes in particular, fine chemistry and biotechnology.
ObjectiveThe students are supposed to obtain detailed insight into the fundamentals of separation processes that are frequently applied in modern life sicence processes in particular, fine chemistry and biotechnology.
ContentThe class covers separation techniques that are central in the purification and downstream processing of chemicals and bio-pharmaceuticals. Examples from both areas illustrate the utility of the methods: 1) Liquid-liquid extraction; 2) Adsorption and chromatography; 3) Membrane processes; 4) Crystallization and precipitation.
Lecture notesHandouts during the class
LiteratureRecommendations for text books will be covered in the class
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: Thermal separation Processes I (151-0926-00) and Modelling and mathematical methods in process and chemical engineering (151-0940-00)
529-0611-00LMolecular Aspects of Catalysts and Surfaces
Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits4GJ. A. van Bokhoven, D. Ferri
AbstractBasic elements of surface science important for materials and catalysis research. Physical and chemical methods important for research in surface science, material science and catalysis are considered and their application is demonstrated on practical examples.
ObjectiveBasic aspects of surface science. Understanding of principles of most important experimental methods used in research concerned with surface science, material science and catalysis.
ContentMethods which are covered embrace: Gas adsorption and surface area analysis, IR-Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption, solid state NMR, Electron Microscopy and others.
529-0615-00LBiochemical and Polymer Reaction Engineering
Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits3GP. Arosio
AbstractPolymerization reactions and processes. Homogeneous and heterogeneous (emulsion) kinetics of free radical polymerization. Post treatment of polymer colloids. Bioprocesses for the production of molecules and therapeutic proteins. Kinetics and design of aggregation processes of macromolecules and proteins.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to learn how to design polymerization reactors and bioreactors to produce polymers and proteins with the specific product qualities that are required by different applications in chemical, pharmaceutical and food industry. This activity includes the post-treatment of polymer latexes, the downstream processing of proteins and the analysis of their colloidal behavior.
ContentWe will cover the fundamental processes and the operation units involved in the production of polymeric materials and proteins. In particular, the following topics are discussed: Overview on the different polymerization processes. Kinetics of free-radical polymerization and use of population balance models. Production of polymers with controlled characteristics in terms of molecular weight distribution. Kinetics and control of emulsion polymerization. Surfactants and colloidal stability. Aggregation kinetics and aggregate structure in conditions of diffusion and reaction limited aggregation. Modeling and design of colloid aggregation processes. Physico-chemical characterization of proteins and description of enzymatic reactions. Operation units in bioprocessing: upstream, reactor design and downstream. Industrial production of therapeutic proteins. Characterization and engineering of protein aggregation. Protein aggregation in biology and in biotechnology as functional materials.
Lecture notesScripts are available on the web page of the Arosio-group: Link
Additional handout of slides will be provided during the lectures.
LiteratureR.J. Hunter, Foundations of Colloid Science, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, 2001
D. Ramkrishna, Population Balances, Academic Press, 2000
H.W. Blanch, D. S. Clark, Biochemical Engineering, CRC Press, 1995
529-0613-00LProcess Simulation and Flowsheeting
Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits3GG. Guillén Gosálbez
AbstractThis course encompasses the theoretical principles of chemical process simulation, as well as its practical application in process analysis and optimization. The techniques for simulating stationary and dynamic processes are presented, and illustrated with case studies. Commercial software packages are presented as a key engineering tool for solving process flowsheeting and simulation problems.
ObjectiveThis course aims to develop the competency of chemical engineers in process flowsheeting and simulation. Specifically, students will develop the following skills:
- Deep understanding of chemical engineering fundamentals: the acquisition of new concepts and the application of previous knowledge in the area of chemical process systems and their mechanisms are crucial to intelligently simulate and evaluate processes.
- Modeling of general chemical processes and systems: students have to be able to identify the boundaries of the system to be studied and develop the set of relevant mathematical relations, which describe the process behavior.
- Mathematical reasoning and computational skills: the familiarization with mathematical algorithms and computational tools is essential to be capable of achieving rapid and reliable solutions to simulation and optimization problems. Hence, students will learn the mathematical principles necessary for process simulation and optimization, as well as the structure and application of process simulation software. Thus, they will be able develop criteria to correctly use commercial software packages and critically evaluate their results.
ContentOverview of process simulation and flowsheeting
- Definition and fundamentals
- Fields of application
- Case studies

Process simulation
- Modeling strategies of process systems
- Mass and energy balances and degrees of freedom of process units and process systems

Process flowsheeting
- Flowsheet partitioning and tearing
- Solution methods for process flowsheeting
- Simultaneous methods
- Sequential methods

Process optimization and analysis
- Classification of optimization problems
- Linear programming
- Non-linear programming
- Optimization methods in process flowsheeting

Commercial software for simulation: Aspen Plus
- Thermodynamic property methods
- Reaction and reactors
- Separation / columns
- Convergence, optimisation & debugging
LiteratureAn exemplary literature list is provided below:
- Biegler, L.T., Grossmann I.E., Westerberg A.W., 1997, systematic methods of chemical process design. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, US.
- Boyadjiev, C., 2010, Theoretical chemical engineering: modeling and simulation. Springer Verlag, Berlin, Germany.
- Ingham, J., Dunn, I.J., Heinzle, E., Prenosil, J.E., Snape, J.B., 2007, Chemical engineering dynamics: an introduction to modelling and computer simulation. John Wiley & Sons, United States.
- Reklaitis, G.V., 1983, Introduction to material and energy balances. John Wiley & Sons, United States.
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic understanding of material and energy balances, thermodynamic property methods and typical unit operations (e.g., reactors, flash separations, distillation/absorption columns etc.) is required.
529-0619-00LChemical Product Design
Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.

Prerequisites: Basic chemistry and chemical engineering knowledge (Diffusion, Thermodynamics, Kinetics,...).
W7 credits3GW. J. Stark
AbstractThe 'Chemical Product Design' course teaches students quantitative concepts to analyze, select and transform theoretical concepts from chemistry and engineering into valuable real-world products. Basic chemistry and chemical engineering knowledge is required (Diffusion, Thermodynamics, Kinetics, ..).
ObjectiveThis course starts with analyzing existing chemical needs and unmet technical challenges. We then develop the skills to critically analyze a specific chemical idea for a product, to rapidly test feasibility or chance for success and to eventually realize its manufacturing. The chemical engineering basics are then used to assess performance of products or devices with non-traditional functions based on dynamic properties (e.g. responsive building materials; personal medical diagnostics on paper strips). The course teaches the interface between laboratory and market with a specific focus on evaluating the chemical value of a given process or compound, and the necessary steps to pursue the resulting project within an entrepreneurial environment. We therefore extend the questions of process design ('how do we make something?') to the question of 'what should we make?
ContentPart A: The 'Chemical Product Design' course starts with discussing questions along, 'What is a chemical product, and why do people pay for it? How does a given compound in a specific setting provide a service?' We then learn how to translate new, often ill-defined wishes or ideas into quantifiable specifications.

Part B: Thermodynamic and kinetic data allow sharp selection criteria for successful products. We learn how to deal with insufficient data and development of robust case models to evaluate their technical and financial constraints. How can parameters of a running process in one industry be scaled into another industry? Can dimensionless engineering numbers be applied beyond traditional chemical processes?

Part C: Manufacturing of commodity products, devices and molecular products: Chemical reactors, separation and detection or isolation units as part of a toolbox. Planning of manufacturing and decisions based on hard data. Providing quantitative answers on potential value generated.

Students are expected to actively develop chemical products along the course. Contributions will be made individually, or in small groups, where a larger topic is studied.
LiteratureCussler, E.L., Moggridge, C.D., Chemical Product Design, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2nd edition, 2011.

Original Literature: Issues and Trends in the Teaching of Process and Product Design, Biegler, L.T., Grossmann, I.E., Westerber, A.W., AIChE J., 56 (5) 1120-25, 2010.
529-0643-00LProcess Design and Development Information
Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits3GG. Storti
AbstractThe course is focused on the design of Chemical Processes, with emphasis on the preliminary stage of the design approach, where process creation and quick selection among many alternatives are important. The main concepts behind more detailed process design and process simulation are also examined in the last part of the course.
ObjectiveThe course is focused on the design of Chemical Processes, with emphasis on the preliminary stage of the design approach, where process creation and quick selection among many alternatives are important. The main concepts behind more detailed process design and process simulation are also examined in the last part of the course.
ContentProcess creation: decomposition strategies (reduction of differences - vinyl chloride production and hierarchical decomposition - ethanol production). Identification of the "base case design". Heuristics for process synthesis.
Preliminary process evaluation: simplified material and energy balances (linear balances), degrees of freedom, short-cut models, flowsheet solution algorithm).
Process Integration: sequencing of distillation columns, synthesis of heat exchanger networks.
Process economic evaluation: equipment sizing and costing, time value of money, cash flow calculations.
Batch Processes: scheduling, sizing and inventories.
Detailed Process Design: unit operation models, flash solution algorithms (different iterative methods, inside-out method), sequencing of nonideal distillation columns, networks of chemical reactors.
Lecture notesno script
LiteratureL.T.Biegler et al., Systematic Methods of Chemical Process Design, Prentice Hall, 1997.
W.D.Seider et al., Process Design Principles, J. Wiley & Sons, 1998.
J.M.Douglas, Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill, 1988.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Thermal Unit Operations
529-0617-00LCatalysis Engineering
Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits3GJ. Pérez-Ramírez, S. J. Mitchell
AbstractThe purpose of the "Catalysis Engineering" course is to provide students with tools that enable the optimal design of catalytic materials and reactor engineering concepts favoring more sustainable manufacturing processes within the chemical industry.
ObjectiveThe course aims at illustrating, from conception to implementation, the design of sustainable catalytic processes by integration of the microlevel (catalyst), mesolevel (reactor), and macrolevel (process). The word "sustainable" implies intensified processes with an improved exploitation of raw materials, wider use of renewable feedstocks, reduction of energy consumption, and minimized environmental impact. By the use of modern case studies of industrial relevance, aspects of catalyst preparation and characterization, kinetics, mass and heat transport, and deactivation are discussed. Emphasis is put on understanding the interaction among these basic elements in order to select the optimal catalytic process. Since no textbooks covering this area are available at this time and the intention of this course is unique, the lectures will be based on own texts and journal articles. During the course, there will be specific topics addressed by industrial contributors.
ContentThe following general aspects:

- Catalyst preparation and characterization
- Kinetics
- Mass and heat transport
- Selectivity
- Deactivation

will be demonstrated for modern catalytic materials and processes of industrial relevance such as:

- Chlorine recycling
- N2O abatement
- Chemoselective hydrogenations
- Hierarchical zeolite catalysts
- Syngas conversion
- Biomass to chemicals and fuels
Lecture notesThe course material is based on an own script, journal articles, and slides.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is assumed that students selecting this course are familiar with general concepts of catalysis, reactor design, and transport phenomena.
529-0837-00LBiomicrofluidic Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 5.

Only for Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits3GA. de Mello
AbstractMicrofluidics describes the behaviour, control and manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained within sub-microliter environments. The use of microfluidic devices offers an opportunity to control physical and chemical processes with unrivalled precision, and in turn provides a route to performing chemistry and biology in an ultra-fast and high-efficiency manner.
ObjectiveThe course will present the theoretical concepts behind the operation and functioning of microfluidic systems, the methods of microfluidic device manufacture and the application of microfluidic architectures and tools to important problems faced in modern day chemical and biological analysis. A key feature of the course will be a research project. The project will run from mid October until mid December. The aim of the project is to develop an understanding of the process of microfluidic design and how microfluidic tools can be applied to chemical or biological problems. The project will involve literature analysis, CFD simulations and experimental work. Students will be expected to present their results through a paper and class presentation.

In general the course will: Introduce the key phenomena that dictate how fluids behave when contained within small volume systems; Explain why the miniaturisation of basic laboratory instrumentation leads to significant gains in experimental “performance”; Present the structure, operation and performance of key microfluidic components; Showcase how microfluidic tools have been used to address important problems in chemistry and biology; Allow students to use this knowledge to design microfluidic tools for specific chemical/biological applications.
ContentSpecific topics that will be addressed during the course include:

Theoretical Concepts: Scaling laws, features of thermal/mass transport, diffusion, basic description of fluid flow in small volumes, microfluidic mixing strategies • Microfluidic Device Manufacture: Basic principles of conventional lithography of rigid materials, ‘soft’ lithography, polymer machining (injection molding, hot embossing and 3D printing) • Analytical Separations: Principles of electrophoresis, electroosmosis, high performance capillary electrophoresis, scaling laws, chip-based electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing • Heat & Mass Transfer: Heat transfer, mass transfer, unit operations, dimensionless numbers, scaling laws, continuous and segmented flows • Computational Fluid Dynamics: Introduction to COMSOL, essentials of microfluidic modelling, application to microfluidic problems • DNA Analysis: Amplification and analysis of nucleic acids on the microscale, oligonucleotide microarrays for high-throughput sequence analysis • Droplet-based Microfluidics: Principles behind the formation, manipulation and use of liquid/liquid segmented flows in high-throughput experimentation • Small Volume Analysis: Application of optical methods for high-throughput and high-content detection in sub-nL volumes • Cellular Analysis: Application of microfluidic tools for high-throughput cell-based analysis, flow cytometry and single cell analysis.
Lecture notesLecture handouts, background literature, problem sheets and notes will be made accessible to enrolled students through the lecture Moodle site.
LiteratureThere is no textbook associated with the course. However, the following articles provide useful background reading prior to enrolment:

1. The origins and the future of microfluidics; G.M. Whitesides, Nature, 442, 368–373 (2006)
2. Control and detection of chemical reactions in microfluidic systems; A.J. deMello, Nature, 442, 394–402 (2006)
3. Small but Perfectly Formed? Successes, Challenges, and Opportunities for Microfluidics in the Chemical and Biological Sciences; D.T. Chiu, A.J. deMello, D. Di Carlo, P.S. Doyle, C. Hansen, R.M. Maceiczyk, R.C.R. Wootton, Chem, 2, 201-223 (2017)
529-0745-00LGeneral and Environmental Toxicology
Only for Chemistry MSc and Chemical and Bioengineering MSc, Programme Regulations 2005.

IMPORTANT NOTICE for Chemistry and Chemical and Bioengineering students: There are two different version of this course for the two regulations (2005/2018), please make sure to register for the correct version according to the regulations you are enrolled in.
W7 credits3VM. Arand, H. Nägeli, B. B. Stieger, I. Werner
AbstractToxicokinetic and toxicodynamic aspects of xenobiotic interactions with cellular structures and mechanisms. Toxic responses at the level of organs (immune-, neuro-, reproductive and genotoxicity) and organisms. Introduction into developmental toxicology and ecotoxicology.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the impact of chemicals on biological systems; evaluation of the effects from different biomedical perspectives.
ContentExplanation of important interactions between xeniobiotic chemicals and cellular structures such as membranes, enzymes, and nucleic acids. Relevance of intake, distribution, excretion, and biochemical transformation processes. Relevance of mixtures. Explanation of important modes of toxic action such as immuno toxicity, neurotoxicity, reproduction toxicity, genotoxicity based on examples of certain xenobiotics and their effects on important organs.
Lecture notesCourse material will be handed out as the lectures progress
LiteratureTextbooks of pharmacology and toxicology (cf. list in course material)
Prerequisites / NoticeEducational basis: basic chemistry, biology and biochemistry
529-0659-00LElectrochemistry Information W6 credits3GP. Novák
AbstractElectrolytes: conductivity, transfer number, diffusion, migration, convection. Electrode/electrolyte interface, Nernst equation, potential vs. turnover. Kinetics, overpotential. Electrocatalysis. Porous electrodes, solid state electrochemistry, current density distribution. Electroanalytical techniques. Applications: electrolysis, galvanotechnics, batteries; electrosynthesis, sensors, corrosion.
ObjectiveTowards the end of the course the students will understand the basics of electrochemistry and will be able to describe and calculate electrochemistry-related matters in industrial processes and products.
ContentHistoric development and applications of electrochemistry. Electrochemical cells: electrodes, electrolyte, charge transfer, material flux, electrochemical conversion. Electrolytes: structure of solutions, conductivity, transfer number, solid and polymer electrolytes, transport processes in the electrolyte (diffusion, migration, convection, limiting current density). Cell voltage, electrode potential, potential series. Reversible electrode reactions: Nernst equation, potential vs. turnover. Electrode / electrolyte phase boundary: electrochemical double layer, exchange current density. Kinetics of electrochemical reactions: global and local current density, overpotential, Tafel equation, Butler / Volmer equation. Electrocatalysis. Porous electrodes, solid state electrochemistry, current density in the electrodes and in the electrolyte, electrochemical engineering. Electroanalytical methods: chronopotentiometry, cyclovoltammetry, electrochemical impedance measurements. Applications: electrolysis, galvanotechnology, batteries, ultracapacitors, fuel cells, electrosynthesis, electrochemical sensors, corrosion.
LiteratureC.H. Hamann, W. Vielstich, Elektrochemie, Wiley-VCH 2005 (4. Ausgabe)
[English version available as well]
151-0209-00LRenewable Energy Technologies Information W4 credits3GA. Steinfeld
AbstractRenewable energy technologies: solar, biomass, wind, geothermal, hydro, waste-to-energy. Focus is on the engineering aspects.
ObjectiveStudents learn the potential and limitations of renewable energy technologies and their contribution towards sustainable energy utilization.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: strong background on the fundamentals of engineering thermodynamics, equivalent to the material taught in the courses Thermodynamics I, II, and III of D-MAVT.
376-1714-00LBiocompatible MaterialsW4 credits3GK. Maniura, M. Rottmar, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction to molecules used for biomaterials, molecular interactions between different materials and biological systems (molecules, cells, tissues). The concept of biocompatibility is discussed and important techniques from biomaterials research and development are introduced.
ObjectiveThe course covers the follwing topics:
1. Introdcution into molecular characteristics of molecules involved in the materials-to-biology interface. Molecular design of biomaterials.
2. The concept of biocompatibility.
3. Introduction into methodology used in biomaterials research and application.
4. Introduction to different material classes in use for medical applications.
ContentIntroduction into natural and polymeric biomaterials used for medical applications. The concepts of biocompatibility, biodegradation and the consequences of degradation products are discussed on the molecular level. Different classes of materials with respect to potential applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery and for medical devices are introduced. Strong focus lies on the molecular interactions between materials having very different bulk and/or surface chemistry with living cells, tissues and organs. In particular the interface between the materials surfaces and the eukaryotic cell surface and possible reactions of the cells with an implant material are elucidated. Techniques to design, produce and characterize materials in vitro as well as in vivo analysis of implanted and explanted materials are discussed.
A link between academic research and industrial entrepreneurship is demonstrated by external guest speakers, who present their current research topics.
Lecture notesHandouts are deposited online (moodle).
LiteratureLiterature:
- Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Ratner B.D. et al, 3rd Edition, 2013
- Comprehensive Biomaterials, Ducheyne P. et al., 1st Edition, 2011

(available online via ETH library)

Handouts and references therin.
636-0007-00LComputational Systems Biology Information W6 credits3V + 2UJ. Stelling
AbstractStudy of fundamental concepts, models and computational methods for the analysis of complex biological networks. Topics: Systems approaches in biology, biology and reaction network fundamentals, modeling and simulation approaches (topological, probabilistic, stoichiometric, qualitative, linear / nonlinear ODEs, stochastic), and systems analysis (complexity reduction, stability, identification).
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of mathematical and computational methods for the modeling, simulation and analysis of biological networks.
ContentBiology has witnessed an unprecedented increase in experimental data and, correspondingly, an increased need for computational methods to analyze this data. The explosion of sequenced genomes, and subsequently, of bioinformatics methods for the storage, analysis and comparison of genetic sequences provides a prominent example. Recently, however, an additional area of research, captured by the label "Systems Biology", focuses on how networks, which are more than the mere sum of their parts' properties, establish biological functions. This is essentially a task of reverse engineering. The aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of corresponding computational methods for the modeling, simulation and analysis of biological networks. We will start with an introduction into the basic units, functions and design principles that are relevant for biology at the level of individual cells. Making extensive use of example systems, the course will then focus on methods and algorithms that allow for the investigation of biological networks with increasing detail. These include (i) graph theoretical approaches for revealing large-scale network organization, (ii) probabilistic (Bayesian) network representations, (iii) structural network analysis based on reaction stoichiometries, (iv) qualitative methods for dynamic modeling and simulation (Boolean and piece-wise linear approaches), (v) mechanistic modeling using ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and finally (vi) stochastic simulation methods.
Lecture notesLink
LiteratureU. Alon, An introduction to systems biology. Chapman & Hall / CRC, 2006.

Z. Szallasi et al. (eds.), System modeling in cellular biology. MIT Press, 2010.

B. Ingalls, Mathematical modeling in systems biology: an introduction. MIT Press, 2013
636-0108-00LBiological Engineering and Biotechnology
Attention: This course was offered in previous semesters with the number: 636-0003-00L "Biological Engineering and Biotechnology". Students that already passed course 636-0003-00L cannot receive credits for course 636-0108-00L.
W4 credits3VM. Fussenegger
AbstractBiological Engineering and Biotechnology will cover the latest biotechnological advances as well as their industrial implementation to engineer mammalian cells for use in human therapy. This lecture will provide forefront insights into key scientific aspects and the main points in industrial decision-making to bring a therapeutic from target to market.
ObjectiveBiological Engineering and Biotechnology will cover the latest biotechnological advances as well as their industrial implementation to engineer mammalian cells for use in human therapy. This lecture will provide forefront insights into key scientific aspects and the main points in industrial decision-making to bring a therapeutic from target to market.
Content1. Insight Into The Mammalian Cell Cycle. Cycling, The Balance Between Proliferation and Cancer - Implications For Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing. 2. The Licence To Kill. Apoptosis Regulatory Networks - Engineering of Survival Pathways To Increase Robustness of Production Cell Lines. 3. Everything Under Control I. Regulated Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells - Facts and Future. 4. Secretion Engineering. The Traffic Jam getting out of the Cell. 5. From Target To Market. An Antibody's Journey From Cell Culture to The Clinics. 6. Biology and Malign Applications. Do Life Sciences Enable the Development of Biological Weapons? 7. Functional Food. Enjoy your Meal! 8. Industrial Genomics. Getting a Systems View on Nutrition and Health - An Industrial Perspective. 9. IP Management - Food Technology. Protecting Your Knowledge For Business. 10. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing I. Introduction to Process Development. 11. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing II. Up- stream Development. 12. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing III. Downstream Development. 13. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing IV. Pharma Development.
Lecture notesHandout during the course.
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