Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Spatial Development and Infrastructure Systems Master Information
3. Semester
Major Courses
Major in Spatial and Landscape Development
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0468-00LParticipatory Modeling in Integrated Landscape Development Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2GE. Celio, N. Salliou
AbstractThe lecture accompanies students into a participatory modelling process analysing the future of urban agriculture in partnership with the city of Zürich. Students get to know theoretical tools involved in participatory modelling as well as concepts and approaches of participatory modelling. Students elaborate the processes from questions to interactive operational models.
ObjectiveThe objective of this lecture is to introduce participatory modelling to students in the context of in-tegrated landscape development initiatives. The lecture aims to transmit main tools and social skills to successfully conduct a participatory modelling process in partnership with an interested institu-tion.
ContentWith this course, students …
… know the phases of a participatory modelling process
… are able to estimate in which case the involvement of stakeholders is necessary, hence are able to discuss advantages and disadvantages of stakeholder involvement at different levels of participation.
… get to know diverse modelling tools and are able to select the proper tool according to the context.
… are able to set-up and apply a Bayesian network-based model in a participatory manner on a real case study.
… get to know techniques to analyse simulations and are able to inform stakeholders in an adequate way
… are able to discuss results together with stakeholders in a structured way.
Major in Transport Systems and Behaviour
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-0445-00LProduction and Operations ManagementW3 credits2GT. Netland
AbstractThis core course on Production and Operations Management provides the students insights into the basic theories, principles, concepts, and techniques used to design, analyze, and improve the operational capabilities of an organization.
ObjectiveThis POM core course provides students a broad theoretical basis for understanding, analyzing, designing, and improving operations. After completing this course:
1. Students can apply key concepts of operations strategy for analyzing production processes.
2. Students can conduct basic process mapping analysis and elaborate the limitations of the chosen method.
3. Students can calculate the needed capacity for production and service operations.
4. Students can select and use problem solving tools and methods.
5. Students can select and use the basic tools of lean thinking to improve the productivity of production and service operations.
6. Students can explain how new technologies and servitization affect production and operations management.
7. Additional skills: Students acquire experience in teamwork, report writing and presentation.
ContentThe course covers the most fundamental strategic and tactical concepts in production and operations management. The lectures cover: Introduction to POM; Operations strategy; Capacity management; Production planning and control; Lean management; Performance measurement; Problem solving; Service operations and servitization; New technologies in POM.
LiteraturePaton, S.; Clegg, B.; Hsuan, J.; Pilkington, A. (2011) Operations Management, 1st ed., McGraw Hill.
363-0445-02LProduction and Operations Management (Additional Cases)
A parallel enrolment to the lecture 363-0445-00L Production and Operations Management is mandatory.
W1 credit2AT. Netland
AbstractExtension to course 363-0445-00 Production and Operations Management.
ObjectiveExtension to course 363-0445-00 Production and Operations Management.
ContentAdditional cases to course 363-0445-00 Production and Operations Management.
Prerequisites / NoticeA parallel enrolment to the lecture 363-0445-00L Production and Operations Management is mandatory.
101-0491-00LAgent Based Modeling in TransportationW6 credits4GT. J. P. Dubernet, M. Balac
AbstractThis lectures provides a round tour of agent based models for transportation policy analysis. First, it introduces statistical methods to combine heterogeneous data sources in a usable representation of the population. Then, agent based models are described in details, and applied in a case study.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, the students should:
- be aware of the various data sources available for mobility behavior analysis
- be able to combine those data sources in a coherent representation of the transportation demand
- understand what agent based models are, when they are useful, and when they are not
- have working knowledge of the MATSim software, and be able to independently evaluate a transportation problem using it
ContentThis lecture provides a complete introduction to agent based models for transportation policy analysis. Two important topics are covered:

1) Combination of heterogeneous data sources to produce a representation of the transport system

At the center of agent based models and other transport analyses is the synthetic population, a statistically realistic representation of the population and their transport needs.
This part will present the most common types of data sources and statistical methods to generate such a population.

2) Use of Agent-Based methods to evaluate transport policies

The second part will introduce the agent based paradigm in details, including tradeoffs compared to state-of-practice methods.

An important part of the grade will come from a policy analysis to carry with the MATSim open-source software, which is developed at ETH Zurich and TU Berlin and gets used more and more by practitioners, notably the Swiss rail operator SBB.
LiteratureAgent-based modeling in general
Helbing, D (2012) Social Self-Organization, Understanding Complex Systems, Springer, Berlin.
Heppenstall, A., A. T. Crooks, L. M. See and M. Batty (2012) Agent-Based Models of Geographical Systems, Springer, Dordrecht.

MATSim

Horni, A., K. Nagel and K.W. Axhausen (eds.) (2016) The Multi-Agent Transport Simulation MATSim, Ubiquity, London
(Link)

Additional relevant readings, mostly scientific articles, will be recommended throughout the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere are no strict preconditions in terms of which lectures the students should have previously attended. However, knowledge of basic statistical theory is expected, and experience with at least one high-level programming language (Java, R, Python...) is useful. The course uses Python.
101-0469-00LRoad SafetyW6 credits4GM. Deublein, P. Eberling
AbstractThe collection and the methods of statistical and geographical analysis of road accidents are important fundamentals of this course. Safety Aspects in design of urban roads are discussed and measures for improving the safety situation are presented. Procedures of infrastructure safety management for administrations and police are another topic.
ObjectiveImparting knowledge base about road safety and the event of accident, presenting possibilities to increase road safety
ContentAccident origin, collection of road accidents, statistical (descriptive and multivariate, accident prediction models) and geographical analysis of road accidents, risk analysis and rehabilitation measures, road safety instruments for infrastructure with focus on road safety audit, Swiss and international transport policy
LiteratureBasic literature: message Via sicura; Directive 2008/96/EC on road infrastructure safety management; ELVIK, R.; VAA, T. (2004). The Handbook of Road Safety Measures. Oxford: ELSEVIER Ltd.; EU-Projekt RiPCORD-iSEREST (Link)
Further literature: will be presented during the course
101-0492-00LMicroscopic Modelling and Simulation of Traffic Operations
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2Gto be announced
AbstractThe course introduces basics of microscopic modelling and simulation of traffic operation, including model development, calibration, validation, data analysis, identification of strategies for improving traffic performance, and evaluation of such strategies. The modelling software used is VISSIM.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce basic concepts in microscopic traffic modelling and simulation, and conduct a realistic traffic engineering project from beginning to end. The students will first familiarize themselves with microscopic traffic models. They will then use a simulation for modeling and analyzing the traffic operations. The emphasis is not only on building the simulation model, but also understanding of the traffic models behind and logically evaluating results. The final goal is to make valid and concrete engineering proposals based on the simulation model.
ContentIn this course the students will first learn some microscopic modelling and simulation concepts, and then complete a traffic engineering project with microscopic traffic simulator VISSIM.

Microscopic modelling and simulation concepts will include:
1) Car following models
2) Lane change models
3) Calibration and validation methodology

Specific tasks for the project will include:
1) Building a model with the simulator VISSIM in order to replicate and analyze the traffic conditions measured/observed.
2) Calibrating and validating the simulation model.
3) Redesigning/extending the model to improve the traffic performance.
Lecture notesThe lecture notes and additional handouts will be provided before the lectures.
LiteratureAdditional literature recommendations will be provided at the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents need to know some basic road transport concepts. The course Road Transport Systems (Verkehr III), or simultaneously taking the course Traffic Engineering is encouraged. The course Transport Simulation (101-0438-00 G) and previous experience with VISSIM is helpful but not mandatory.
Network Infrastructure
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0419-00LRailway Construction and Maintenance
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits4GF. Corman
AbstractTrack geometry including calculation and measuring as well as related data systems; interaction between track and vehicles, vehicle dynamics, stress; track construction including special features of railway bridges and tunnels; track diagnostics and forcast; track maintenance and related methods
ObjectiveThe lecture gives a deeper insight into track geometry, the interaction between track and vehicles as well as in construction and dimensioning of the track. Methods for the diagnosis of the state of the track and its forcast are shown. State-of-the-art maintenance strategies and technologies are presented.
ContentTrack geometry including calculation and measuring as well as related data systems; interaction between track and vehicles, vehicle dynamics, stress; track construction including special features of railway bridges and tunnels; track diagnostics and forcast; track maintenance and related methods
Lecture notesThe slides will be made available.
LiteratureA list with related technical literature will be handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture Railway Infrastructures (Transportation II) is recommended.
101-0258-00LRiver EngineeringW3 credits2GG. R. Bezzola
AbstractThe lecture addresses the fundamentals to quantitatively describe the flow of water, the transport of sediments and morphological changes like erosion or deposition in watercourses. Further addressed are the design and dimensioning of river engineering works to create and ensure sufficient capacity, channel stability as well as to ensure the ecological functions of the watercourse.
ObjectiveThe students shall
- be able to describe the interrelation between discharge, sediment transport and channel evolution quantitatively
- know the fundamentals and be able to apply the approaches and methods to treat river engineering problems associated with flood protection and river restoration
- be capable to design and dimension river engineering works needed to influence the processes in watercourses
ContentThe first part of the lecture treats the fundamentals required to deal with river engineering problems. Sampling methods for the river bed material and methods to calculate the discharge in alluvial rivers are presented. The process of river bed armoring and the principles of incipient motion, initiation of erosion as well as sediment transport (bed load, suspended load) are treated.
In the second part of the lecture, the procedures to quantify the sediment budget and the morphological changes (erosion, aggradation) in river systems are explained. Furthermore, the process of natural channel formation and the different plan forms of rivers (straight, meandering, braided) are discussed. Own chapters are dedicated to the topics of channel stability, bed forms, river morphology and scour.
The last part of the lecture concentrates on the design and dimensioning of river engineering works. The topics focussed on are the stabilization of banks and of the longitudinal profile of rivers.
Lecture notesLecture notes "River Engineering" (in German, 470 pages, including list of references)
LiteratureThe lecture notes contain a comprehensive list of references for further reading.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrongly recommended lectures:
Hydrology (102-0293-AAL), Hydraulics I (101-0203-01L) and Hydraulic Engineering (101-0206-00L)

A practical exercise (voluntary, unmarked) is offered to deepen the learned subjects.
This exercise bases on field data, which are partly collected by the students on a river in nature. Besides the collection of fundamentals and field data, the exercise comprehends the calculation of the stage-discharge relationship, of the critical discharges for initiation of bed load transport and bed erosion and of the annual sediment load in a given river reach.
101-0469-00LRoad SafetyW6 credits4GM. Deublein, P. Eberling
AbstractThe collection and the methods of statistical and geographical analysis of road accidents are important fundamentals of this course. Safety Aspects in design of urban roads are discussed and measures for improving the safety situation are presented. Procedures of infrastructure safety management for administrations and police are another topic.
ObjectiveImparting knowledge base about road safety and the event of accident, presenting possibilities to increase road safety
ContentAccident origin, collection of road accidents, statistical (descriptive and multivariate, accident prediction models) and geographical analysis of road accidents, risk analysis and rehabilitation measures, road safety instruments for infrastructure with focus on road safety audit, Swiss and international transport policy
LiteratureBasic literature: message Via sicura; Directive 2008/96/EC on road infrastructure safety management; ELVIK, R.; VAA, T. (2004). The Handbook of Road Safety Measures. Oxford: ELSEVIER Ltd.; EU-Projekt RiPCORD-iSEREST (Link)
Further literature: will be presented during the course
101-0492-00LMicroscopic Modelling and Simulation of Traffic Operations
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2Gto be announced
AbstractThe course introduces basics of microscopic modelling and simulation of traffic operation, including model development, calibration, validation, data analysis, identification of strategies for improving traffic performance, and evaluation of such strategies. The modelling software used is VISSIM.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce basic concepts in microscopic traffic modelling and simulation, and conduct a realistic traffic engineering project from beginning to end. The students will first familiarize themselves with microscopic traffic models. They will then use a simulation for modeling and analyzing the traffic operations. The emphasis is not only on building the simulation model, but also understanding of the traffic models behind and logically evaluating results. The final goal is to make valid and concrete engineering proposals based on the simulation model.
ContentIn this course the students will first learn some microscopic modelling and simulation concepts, and then complete a traffic engineering project with microscopic traffic simulator VISSIM.

Microscopic modelling and simulation concepts will include:
1) Car following models
2) Lane change models
3) Calibration and validation methodology

Specific tasks for the project will include:
1) Building a model with the simulator VISSIM in order to replicate and analyze the traffic conditions measured/observed.
2) Calibrating and validating the simulation model.
3) Redesigning/extending the model to improve the traffic performance.
Lecture notesThe lecture notes and additional handouts will be provided before the lectures.
LiteratureAdditional literature recommendations will be provided at the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents need to know some basic road transport concepts. The course Road Transport Systems (Verkehr III), or simultaneously taking the course Traffic Engineering is encouraged. The course Transport Simulation (101-0438-00 G) and previous experience with VISSIM is helpful but not mandatory.
Major Courses for all Majors
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0507-00LInfrastructure Management 3: Optimisation Tools
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits2GB. T. Adey
AbstractThis course will provide an introduction to the methods and tools that can be used to determine optimal inspection and intervention strategies and work programs for infrastructure.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course students will be able:
- to use preventive maintenance models, such as block replacement, periodic preventive maintenance with minimal repair, and preventive maintenance based on parameter control, to determine when, where and what should be done to maintain infrastructure
- to take into consideration future uncertainties in appropriate ways when devising and evaluating monitoring and management strategies for physical infrastructure
- to use operation research methods to find optimal solutions to infastructure management problems
ContentPart 1:
Explanation of the principal models of preventative maintenance, including block replacement, periodic group repair, periodic maintenance with minimal repair and age replacement, and when they can be used to determine optimal intervention strategies

Part 2:
Explanation of preventive maintenance models that are based on parameter control, including Markovian models and opportunistic replacement models

Part 3:
Explanation of the methods that can be used to take into consideration the future uncertainties in the evaluation of monitoring strategies

Part 4:
Explanation of how operations research methods can be used to solve typical infrastructure management problems.
Lecture notesA script will be given out at the beginning of the course.
Class relevant materials will be distributed electronically before the start of class.
A copy of the slides will be handed out at the beginning of each class.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful completion of IM1: 101-0579-00 Evaluation tools is a prerequisite for this course.
Interdisciplinary Project Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0489-02LInterdisciplinary Project Restricted registration - show details
Only for Spatial Development and Infrastructure Systems MSc.
O12 credits24AK. W. Axhausen
AbstractWorking on a concrete interdisciplinary task on spatial development and infrastructure systems
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
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