Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialization: General Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
Major in Biocompatible Materials
Core Courses
376-1622-00L Practical Methods in Tissue Engineering (offered in the Autumn Semester) and 376-1624-00L Practical Methods in Biofabrication (offered in the Spring Semester) are mutually exclusive to be eligible for credits.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0980-00LBiofluiddynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UD. Obrist, P. Jenny
AbstractIntroduction to the fluid dynamics of the human body and the modeling of physiological flow processes (biomedical fluid dynamics).
ObjectiveA basic understanding of fluid dynamical processes in the human body. Knowledge of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics and the ability to apply these concepts appropriately.
ContentThis lecture is an introduction to the fluid dynamics of the human body (biomedical fluid dynamics). For selected topics of human physiology, we introduce fundamental concepts of fluid dynamics (e.g., creeping flow, incompressible flow, flow in porous media, flow with particles, fluid-structure interaction) and use them to model physiological flow processes. The list of studied topics includes the cardiovascular system and related diseases, blood rheology, microcirculation, respiratory fluid dynamics and fluid dynamics of the inner ear.
Lecture notesLecture notes are provided electronically.
LiteratureA list of books on selected topics of biofluiddynamics can be found on the course web page.
376-1308-00LDevelopment Strategies for Medical Implants Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25 until 30.
Assignments will be considered chronological.
W3 credits2V + 1UJ. Mayer-Spetzler, M. Rubert
AbstractIntroduction to development strategies for implantable devices considering the interdependecies of biocompatibility, clinical and economical requirements ; discussion of the state of the art and actual trends in in orthopedics, sports medicine, traumatology and cardio-vascular surgery as well as regenerative medicine (tissue engineering).
ObjectiveBasic considerations in implant development
Concept of structural and surface biocompatiblity and its relevance for the design of implant and surgical technique
Understanding of conflicting factors, e.g. clinical need, economics and regulatory requirements
Concepts of tissue engineering, its strengths and weaknesses as current and future clinical solution
ContentBiocompatibility as bionic guide line for the development of medical implants; implant and implantation related tissue reactions, biocompatible materials and material processing technologies; implant testing and regulatory procedures; discussion of the state of the art and actual trends in implant development in orthopedics, sports medicine, traumatology, spinal and cardio-vascular surgery; introduction to tissue engineering. Selected topics will be further illustrated by commented movies from surgeries.

Seminar:
Group seminars on selected controversial topics in implant development. Participation is mandatory

Planned excursions (limited availability, not mandatory, to be confirmed):
1. Participation (as visitor) on a life surgery (travel at own expense)
Lecture notesScribt (electronically available):
- presented slides
- selected scientific papers for further reading
LiteratureReference to key papers will be provided during the lectures
Prerequisites / NoticeAchieved Bachelor degree is mandatory

The number of participants in the course is limited to 25-30 students in total.

Students will be exposed to surgical movies which may cause emotional reactions. The viewing of the surgical movies is voluntary and is on the student's own responsability.
376-1392-00LMechanobiology: Implications for Development, Regeneration and Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2GA. Ferrari, K. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractThis course will emphasize the importance of mechanobiology to cell determination and behavior. Its importance to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will also be addressed. Finally, this course will discuss how age and disease adversely alter major mechanosensitive developmental programs.
ObjectiveThis course is designed to illuminate the importance of mechanobiological processes to life as well as to teach good experimental strategies to investigate mechanobiological phenomena.
ContentTypically, cell differentiation is studied under static conditions (cells grown on rigid plastic tissue culture dishes in two-dimensions), an experimental approach that, while simplifying the requirements considerably, is short-sighted in scope. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many tissues modulate their developmental programs to specifically match the mechanical stresses that they will encounter in later life. Examples of known mechanosensitive developmental programs include osteogenesis (bones), chondrogenesis (cartilage), and tendogenesis (tendons). Furthermore, general forms of cell behavior such as migration, extracellular matrix deposition, and complex tissue differentiation are also regulated by mechanical stimuli. Mechanically-regulated cellular processes are thus ubiquitous, ongoing and of great clinical importance.

The overall importance of mechanobiology to humankind is illustrated by the fact that nearly 80% of our entire body mass arises from tissues originating from mechanosensitive developmental programs, principally bones and muscles. Unfortunately, our ability to regenerate mechanosensitive tissue diminishes in later life. As it is estimated that the fraction of the western world population over 65 years of age will double in the next 25 years, an urgency in the global biomedical arena exists to better understand how to optimize complex tissue development under physiologically-relevant mechanical environments for purposes of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureTopical Scientific Manuscripts
376-1614-00LPrinciples in Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2VK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractFundamentals in blood coagulation; thrombosis, blood rheology, immune system, inflammation, foreign body reaction on the molecular level and the entire body are discussed. Applications of biomaterials for tissue engineering in different tissues are introduced. Fundamentals in medical implantology, in situ drug release, cell transplantation and stem cell biology are discussed.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of molecular aspects for the application of biodegradable and biocompatible Materials. Fundamentals of tissue reactions (eg. immune responses) against implants and possible clinical consequences will be discussed.
ContentThis class continues with applications of biomaterials and devices introduced in Biocompatible Materials I. Fundamentals in blood coagulation; thrombosis, blood rheology; immune system, inflammation, foreign body reaction on the level of the entire body and on the molecular level are introduced. Applications of biomaterials for tissue engineering in the vascular system, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, tendons and ligaments, bone, teeth, nerve and brain, and drug delivery systems are introduced. Fundamentals in medical implantology, in situ drug release, cell transplantation and stem cell biology are discussed.
Lecture notesHandouts provided during the classes and references therin.
LiteratureThe molecular Biology of the Cell, Alberts et al., 5th Edition, 2009.
Principles in Tissue Engineering, Langer et al., 2nd Edition, 2002
376-1624-00LPractical Methods in Biofabrication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PM. Zenobi-Wong, S. Schürle-Finke, K. Würtz-Kozak
AbstractBiofabrication involves the assembly of materials, cells, and biological building blocks into grafts for tissue engineering and in vitro models. The student learns techniques involving the fabrication and characterization of tissue engineered scaffolds and the design of 3D models based on medical imaging data. They apply this knowledge to design, manufacture and evaluate a biofabricated graft.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to give students hands-on experience with the tools required to fabricate tissue engineered grafts. During the first part of this course, students will gain practical knowledge in hydrogel synthesis and characterization, fuse deposition modelling and stereolithography, bioprinting and bioink design, electrospinning, and cell culture and viability testing. They will also learn the properties of common biocompatible materials used in fabrication and how to select materials based on the application requirements. The students learn principles for design of 3D models. Finally the students will apply their knowledge to a problem-based project.
Prerequisites / NoticeNot recommended if passed 376-1622-00 Practical Methods in Tissue Engineering
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