Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Biomedical Engineering Master Information
Major Courses
Molecular Bioengineering
Recommended Elective Courses
These courses are particularly recommended for the Molecular Bioengineering track. Please consult your track adviser if you wish to select other subjects.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0628-00LScanning Probe Microscopy Lab Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
Please address your application to Andreas Stemmer (Link).

Simultaneous enrolment in 151-0622-00L Measuring on the Nanometer Scale is required.
W2 credits2PA. Stemmer
AbstractPractical application of scanning probe microscopy techniques in the field of nanoscale and molecular electronics. Limited access.
ObjectiveDesign, realisation, evaluation, and interpretation of experiments in scanning probe microscopy.
Prerequisites / NoticeApplication required! The number of participants is limited.

Enrollment in the Master course 151-0622-00L Measuring on the Nanometer Scale is required.

Applications include (i) a summary of your research experience in micro and nanoscale science, (ii) a short description of your goals for the next three years, and (iii) a statement of what you personally expect to gain from attending this course.
Send applications to Andreas Stemmer Link
151-0630-00LNanorobotics Information W4 credits2V + 1US. Pané Vidal
AbstractNanorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that includes topics from nanotechnology and robotics. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field. These topics include basic principles of nanorobotics, building parts for nanorobotic systems, powering and locomotion of nanorobots, manipulation, assembly and sensing using nanorobots, molecular motors, and nanorobotics for nanomedicine.
227-0946-00LMolecular Imaging - Basic Principles and Biomedical ApplicationsW2 credits2VM. Rudin
AbstractConcept: What is molecular imaging.
Discussion/comparison of the various imaging modalities used in molecular imaging.
Design of target specific probes: specificity, delivery, amplification strategies.
Biomedical Applications.
ObjectiveMolecular Imaging is a rapidly emerging discipline that translates concepts developed in molecular biology and cellular imaging to in vivo imaging in animals and ultimatly in humans. Molecular imaging techniques allow the study of molecular events in the full biological context of an intact organism and will therefore become an indispensable tool for biomedical research.
ContentConcept: What is molecular imaging.
Discussion/comparison of the various imaging modalities used in molecular imaging.
Design of target specific probes: specificity, delivery, amplification strategies.
Biomedical Applications.
376-1620-00LSkeletal Repair Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 42.

Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc and Biomedical Engineering MSc.
W3 credits3GS. Grad, D. Eglin, F. Moriarty, M. Stoddart
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into traumatic and degenerative pathologies of skeletal tissues. Emphasis is put on bone, cartilage and intervertebral disc. Established and new treatments are described, including cell, gene and molecular therapy, biomaterials, tissue engineering and infection prevention. In vitro/in vivo models are explained.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to acquire a basic understanding of
(1) important pathologies of skeletal tissues and their consequences for the patient and the public health
(2) current surgical approaches for skeletal repair, their advantages and drawbacks
(3) recent advances in biological strategies for skeletal repair, such as (stem) cell therapy, gene therapy, biomaterials and tissue engineering
(4) pathology, prevention and treatment of implant associated infections
(5) in vitro and in vivo models for basic, translational and pre-clinical studies
ContentAccording to the expected background knowledge, the cellular and extracellular composition and the structure of the skeletal tissues, including bone, cartilage, intervertebral disc, ligament and tendon will briefly be recapitulated. The functions of the healthy tissues and the impact of acute injury (e.g. bone fracture) or progressive degenerative failure (e.g. osteoarthritis) will be demonstrated. Physiological self-repair mechanisms, their limitations, and current (surgical) treatment options will be outlined. Particular emphasis will be put on novel approaches for biological repair or regeneration of critical bone defects, damaged hyaline cartilage of major articulating joints, and degenerative intervertebral disc tissues. These new treatment options include autologous cell therapies, stem cell applications, bioactive factors, gene therapy, biomaterials or biopolymers; while tissue engineering / regenerative medicine is considered as a combination of some of these factors. In vitro bioreactor systems and in vivo animal models will be described for preclinical testing of newly developed materials and techniques. Bacterial infection as a major complication of invasive treatment will be explained, covering also established and new methods for its effective inhibition. Finally, the translation of new therapies for skeletal repair from the laboratory to the clinical application will be illustrated by recent developments.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in the cellular and molecular composition, structure and function of healthy skeletal tissues, especially bone, cartilage and intervertebral disc are required; furthermore, basic understanding of biomaterial properties, cell-surface interactions, and bacterial infection are necessary to follow this course.
376-1624-00LPractical Methods in Biofabrication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W5 credits4PM. Zenobi-Wong, S. Schürle-Finke, K. Würtz-Kozak
AbstractBiofabrication involves the assembly of materials, cells, and biological building blocks into grafts for tissue engineering and in vitro models. The student learns techniques involving the fabrication and characterization of tissue engineered scaffolds and the design of 3D models based on medical imaging data. They apply this knowledge to design, manufacture and evaluate a biofabricated graft.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to give students hands-on experience with the tools required to fabricate tissue engineered grafts. During the first part of this course, students will gain practical knowledge in hydrogel synthesis and characterization, fuse deposition modelling and stereolithography, bioprinting and bioink design, electrospinning, and cell culture and viability testing. They will also learn the properties of common biocompatible materials used in fabrication and how to select materials based on the application requirements. The students learn principles for design of 3D models. Finally the students will apply their knowledge to a problem-based project.
Prerequisites / NoticeNot recommended if passed 376-1622-00 Practical Methods in Tissue Engineering
402-0342-00LMedical Physics IIW6 credits2V + 1UP. Manser
AbstractApplications of ionizing radiation in medicine such as radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and radiation diagnostics. Theory of dosimetry based on cavity theory and clinical consequences. Fundamentals of dose calculation, optimization and evaluation. Concepts of external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Recent and future developments: IMRT, IGRT, SRS/SBRT, particle therapy.
ObjectiveGetting familiar with the different medical applications of ionizing radiation in the fields of radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and radiation diagnostics. Dealing with concepts such as external beam radiation therapy as well as brachytherapy for the treatment of cancer patients. Understanding the fundamental cavity theory for dose measurements and its consequences on clinical practice. Understanding different delivery techniques such as IMRT, IGRT, SRS/SBRT, brachytherapy, particle therapy using protons, heavy ions or neutrons. Understanding the principles of dose calculation, optimization and evaluation for radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and radiation diagnostic applications. Finally, the lecture aims to demonstrate that medical physics is a fascinating and evolving discipline where physics can directly be used for the benefits of patients and the society.
ContentIn this lecture, the use of ionizing radiation in different clinical applications is discussed. Primarily, we will concentrate on radiation therapy and will cover applications such as external beam radiotherapy with photons and electrons, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery, brachytherapy, particle therapy using protons, heavy ions or neutrons. In addition, dosimetric methods based on cavity theory are reviewed and principles of treatment planning (dose calculation, optimization and evaluation) are discussed. Next to these topics, applications in nuclear medicine and radiation diagnostics are explained with the clear focus on dosimetric concepts and behaviour.
Lecture notesA script will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is recommended that the students have taken the lecture Medical Physics I in advance.
551-1132-00LBasic Virology Information
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits1V
AbstractIntroduction into the basics of virology, including characterization of viruses, virus-cell interactions, virus-host interactions, virus-host population interactions, basics of prevention and prophylaxis as well as diagnostics.
ObjectiveIntroduction into the basics of virology.
ContentBasics in virology. Characterization of viruses, virus-cell interactions, virus-host interactions, virus-host population interactions, basics of prevention and prophylaxis as well as diagnostics.
Lecture notesThe lecture uses the lecturer's 'Allgemeine Virologie' as a basis.
The lecturer's slides as well as selected primary literature will be provided 24-48 hrs prior to the lecture in pdf format.
LiteratureFlint et al., 2009. Principles of Virology, 3rd Edition.
ASM Press, Washington, DC, USA.
Vol I. ISBN 978-1-55581-479-3
Vol II. ISBN 978-1-55581-480-9
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in molecular biology, cell biology, immunology.
636-0110-00LImmunoEngineering
Attention: This course was offered in previous semesters with the number: 636-0010-00L "Biomolecular Engineering and Immunotechnology". Students that already passed course 636-0010-00L cannot receive credits for course 636-0110-00L.
W4 credits3VS. Reddy
AbstractImmunoengineering is an emerging area of research that uses technology and engineering principles to understand and manipulate the immune system. This is a highly interdisciplinary field and thus the instructor will present an integrated view that will include basic immunology, systems immunology, and synthetic immunology.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the basic principles and applications of Immunoengineering. There will be an emphasis directed towards applications directly relevant in immunotherapy and biotechnology. This course requires prerequisite knowledge of molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics; these subjects will only be reviewed briefly during the course.
ContentImmunoengineering will be divided into three primary sections: i) basic principles in immunology; ii) systems immunology; iii) synthetic immunology.

I. Basic principles in immunology will cover the foundational concepts of innate and adaptive immunity. Topics include immunogenetics, pattern recognition receptors, lymphocyte receptors, humoral and T cell responses.

II. Systems immunology uses quantitative multiscale measurements and computational biology to describe and understand the complexity of the immune system. In this section we will cover high-throughput methods that are used to understand and profile immune responses.

III. Synthetic immunology is based on using methods in molecular and cellular engineering to control immune cell function and behavior. In this section students will learn about how immune receptors and cells are being engineered for applications such as cancer immunotherapy and precision and personalized medicine.
LiteratureReading material from Janeway's Immunobiology will be distributed, so students do not need to worry about purchasing or obtaining it. Supporting reading material from research articles will be provided to students.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires prerequisite knowledge of molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics; these subjects will only be reviewed briefly during the course.
636-0111-00LSynthetic Biology I
Attention: This course was offered in previous semesters with the number: 636-0002-00L "Synthetic Biology I". Students that already passed course 636-0002-00L cannot receive credits for course 636-0111-00L.
W4 credits3GS. Panke, J. Stelling
AbstractTheoretical & practical introduction into the design of dynamic biological systems at different levels of abstraction, ranging from biological fundamentals of systems design (introduction to bacterial gene regulation, elements of transcriptional & translational control, advanced genetic engineering) to engineering design principles (standards, abstractions) mathematical modelling & systems desig
ObjectiveAfter the course, students will be able to theoretically master the biological and engineering fundamentals required for biological design to be able to participate in the international iGEM competition (see Link).
ContentThe overall goal of the course is to familiarize the students with the potential, the requirements and the problems of designing dynamic biological elements that are of central importance for manipulating biological systems, primarily (but not exclusively) prokaryotic systems. Next, the students will be taken through a number of successful examples of biological design, such as toggle switches, pulse generators, and oscillating systems, and apply the biological and engineering fundamentals to these examples, so that they get hands-on experience on how to integrate the various disciplines on their way to designing biological systems.
Lecture notesHandouts during classes.
LiteratureMark Ptashne, A Genetic Switch (3rd ed), Cold Spring Haror Laboratory Press
Uri Alon, An Introduction to Systems Biology, Chapman & Hall
Prerequisites / Notice1) Though we do not place a formal requirement for previous participation in particular courses, we expect all participants to be familiar with a certain level of biology and of mathematics. Specifically, there will be material for self study available on Link as of mid January, and everybody is expected to be fully familiar with this material BEFORE THE CLASS BEGINS to be able to follow the different lectures. Please contact Link for access to material
2) The course is also thought as a preparation for the participation in the international iGEM synthetic biology summer competition (Link, Link). This competition is also the contents of the course Synthetic Biology II. Link
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