Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Mechanical Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
Bioengineering
The courses listed in this category “Core Courses” are recommended. Alternative courses can be chosen in agreement with the tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0060-00LThermodynamics and Energy Conversion in Micro- and Nanoscale TechnologiesW4 credits2V + 2UD. Poulikakos, H. Eghlidi, T. Schutzius
AbstractThe lecture deals with both: the thermodynamics in nano- and microscale systems and the thermodynamics of ultra-fast phenomena. Typical areas of applications are microelectronics manufacturing and cooling, laser technology, manufacturing of novel materials and coatings, surface technologies, wetting phenomena and related technologies, and micro- and nanosystems and devices.
ObjectiveThe student will acquire fundamental knowledge of micro and nanoscale interfacial thermofluidics including light interaction with surfaces. Furthermore, the student will be exposed to a host of applications ranging from superhydrophobic surfaces and microelectronics cooling to biofluidics and solar energy, all of which will be discussed in the context of the course.
ContentThermodynamic aspects of intermolecular forces, Molecular dynamics; Interfacial phenomena; Surface tension; Wettability and contact angle; Wettability of Micro/Nanoscale textured surfaces: superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity.

Physics of micro- and nanofluidics.

Principles of electrodynamics and optics; Optical waves at interfaces; Plasmonics: principles and applications.
Lecture notesyes
151-0116-10LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for Engineers II Information W4 credits4GP. Koumoutsakos, S. M. Martin
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
ObjectiveThe course will teach
- programming models and tools for multi and many-core architectures
- fundamental concepts of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences
ContentHigh Performance Computing:
- Advanced topics in shared-memory programming
- Advanced topics in MPI
- GPU architectures and CUDA programming

Uncertainty Quantification:
- Uncertainty quantification under parametric and non-parametric modeling uncertainty
- Bayesian inference with model class assessment
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation
Lecture notesLink
Class notes, handouts
Literature- Class notes
- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein
- CUDA by example, J. Sanders and E. Kandrot
- Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial, Devinderjit Sivia
151-0306-00LVisualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality I Information W4 credits4GA. Kunz
AbstractTechnology of Virtual Reality. Human factors, Creation of virtual worlds, Lighting models, Display- and acoustic- systems, Tracking, Haptic/tactile interaction, Motion platforms, Virtual prototypes, Data exchange, VR Complete systems, Augmented reality, Collaboration systems; VR and Design; Implementation of the VR in the industry; Human Computer Interfaces (HCI).
ObjectiveThe product development process in the future will be characterized by the Digital Product which is the center point for concurrent engineering with teams spreas worldwide. Visualization and simulation of complex products including their physical behaviour at an early stage of development will be relevant in future. The lecture will give an overview to techniques for virtual reality, to their ability to visualize and to simulate objects. It will be shown how virtual reality is already used in the product development process.
ContentIntroduction to the world of virtual reality; development of new VR-techniques; introduction to 3D-computergraphics; modelling; physical based simulation; human factors; human interaction; equipment for virtual reality; display technologies; tracking systems; data gloves; interaction in virtual environment; navigation; collision detection; haptic and tactile interaction; rendering; VR-systems; VR-applications in industry, virtual mockup; data exchange, augmented reality.
Lecture notesA complete version of the handout is also available in English.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen:
keine
Vorlesung geeignet für D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-MTEC und D-INF

Testat/ Kredit-Bedingungen/ Prüfung:
– Teilnahme an Vorlesung und Kolloquien
– Erfolgreiche Durchführung von Übungen in Teams
– Mündliche Einzelprüfung 30 Minuten
151-0522-00LCase Studies in Computer Aided EngineeringW4 credits3GD. Valtorta
AbstractThis is a modeling and simulation engineering class. The course shows how Simulation with the Finite Element Method proves itself to be an useful tool in engineering problems to solve challenging and complex tasks and to deal with the physics of analyzed systems.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to introduce students to the simulation-based engineering design with CAE methods. Different case studies demonstrating the application of CAE in different engineering disciplines will be disclosed with the contribution of experts and examples from industries and research institutions. Class will focus on engineering approach to be used to analyze challenging problems. It will then address problem idealization throughout modeling techniques, to be worked out by state of the art simulation selected from industries case studies. Validation of simulation models compared to evidence from experimental method will then be discussed.
ContentDifferent case studies demonstrating the application of CAE methods in a variety of engineering disciplines will be presented. Application of CAE methods will be mainly focused on structural mechanics area. However an overview of possible applications involving fluid dynamics and electromagnetics will provide students with a complete scenario of multiphysics simulations. Students shall choose 2 different subjects among the case studies presented, practice the engineering workflow and solve complex problems by building simplified simulation models, using FEA software. The results of their investigations will be summarized in a technical report and a short presentation, which will then be discussed during oral examination
Lecture notesLecture notes will be shared with students on Moodle throughout the semester.
LiteratureNo textbook required. Theory books will be recommended in each lecture for selected topics.
Prerequisites / NoticeFE Toolkurs recommended, but not mandatory.
151-0530-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos II Information
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits4GG. Haller
AbstractThe internal structure of chaos; Hamiltonian dynamical systems; Normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds; Geometric singular perturbation theory; Finite-time dynamical systems
ObjectiveThe course introduces the student to advanced, comtemporary concepts of nonlinear dynamical systems analysis.
ContentI. The internal structure of chaos: symbolic dynamics, Bernoulli shift map, sub-shifts of finite type; chaos is numerical iterations.

II.Hamiltonian dynamical systems: conservation and recurrence, stability of fixed points, integrable systems, invariant tori, Liouville-Arnold-Jost Theorem, KAM theory.

III. Normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds: Crash course on differentiable manifolds, existence, persistence, and smoothness, applications.
IV. Geometric singular perturbation theory: slow manifolds and their stability, physical examples. V. Finite-time dynamical system; detecting Invariant manifolds and coherent structures in finite-time flows
Lecture notesStudents have to prepare their own lecture notes
LiteratureBooks will be recommended in class
Prerequisites / NoticeNonlinear Dynamics I (151-0532-00) or equivalent
151-0630-00LNanorobotics Information W4 credits2V + 1US. Pané Vidal
AbstractNanorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that includes topics from nanotechnology and robotics. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field. These topics include basic principles of nanorobotics, building parts for nanorobotic systems, powering and locomotion of nanorobots, manipulation, assembly and sensing using nanorobots, molecular motors, and nanorobotics for nanomedicine.
151-0641-00LIntroduction to Robotics and Mechatronics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.

Enrollment is only valid through registration on the MSRL website (Link). Online registrations begin on the 1st of February 2019. Registrations per e-mail is no longer accepted!
W4 credits2V + 2UB. Nelson, N. Shamsudhin
AbstractThe aim of this lecture is to expose students to the fundamentals of mechatronic and robotic systems. Over the course of these lectures, topics will include how to interface a computer with the real world, different types of sensors and their use, different types of actuators and their use.
ObjectiveAn ever-increasing number of mechatronic systems are finding their way into our daily lives. Mechatronic systems synergistically combine computer science, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. Robotics systems can be viewed as a subset of mechatronics that focuses on sophisticated control of moving devices.

The aim of this course is to practically and theoretically expose students to the fundamentals of mechatronic and robotic systems. Over the course of the semester, the lecture topics will include an overview of robotics, an introduction to different types of sensors and their use, the programming of microcontrollers and interfacing these embedded computers with the real world, signal filtering and processing, an introduction to different types of actuators and their use, an overview of computer vision, and forward and inverse kinematics. Throughout the course, students will periodically attend laboratory sessions and implement lessons learned during lectures on real mechatronic systems. By the end of the course, you will be able to independently choose, design and integrate these different building blocks into a working mechatronic system.
ContentThe course consists of weekly lectures and lab sessions. The weekly topics are the following:
0. Course Introduction
1. C Programming
2. Sensors
3. Data Acquisition
4. Signal Processing
5. Digital Filtering
6. Actuators
7. Computer Vision and Kinematics
8. Modeling and Control
9. Review and Outlook

The lecture schedule can be found on our course page on the MSRL website (Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students are expected to be familiar with C programming.
151-0946-00LMacromolecular Engineering: Networks and GelsW4 credits4GM. Tibbitt
AbstractThis course will provide an introduction to the design and physics of soft matter with a focus on polymer networks and hydrogels. The course will integrate fundamental aspects of polymer physics, engineering of soft materials, mechanics of viscoelastic materials, applications of networks and gels in biomedical applications including tissue engineering, 3D printing, and drug delivery.
ObjectiveThe main learning objectives of this course are: 1. Identify the key characteristics of soft matter and the properties of ideal and non-ideal macromolecules. 2. Calculate the physical properties of polymers in solution. 3. Predict macroscale properties of polymer networks and gels based on constituent chemical structure and topology. 4. Design networks and gels for industrial and biomedical applications. 5. Read and evaluate research papers on recent research on networks and gels and communicate the content orally to a multidisciplinary audience.
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts.
LiteraturePolymer Physics by M. Rubinstein and R.H. Colby; samplings from other texts.
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I+II, Thermodynamics I+II
151-0980-00LBiofluiddynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UD. Obrist, P. Jenny
AbstractIntroduction to the fluid dynamics of the human body and the modeling of physiological flow processes (biomedical fluid dynamics).
ObjectiveA basic understanding of fluid dynamical processes in the human body. Knowledge of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics and the ability to apply these concepts appropriately.
ContentThis lecture is an introduction to the fluid dynamics of the human body (biomedical fluid dynamics). For selected topics of human physiology, we introduce fundamental concepts of fluid dynamics (e.g., creeping flow, incompressible flow, flow in porous media, flow with particles, fluid-structure interaction) and use them to model physiological flow processes. The list of studied topics includes the cardiovascular system and related diseases, blood rheology, microcirculation, respiratory fluid dynamics and fluid dynamics of the inner ear.
Lecture notesLecture notes are provided electronically.
LiteratureA list of books on selected topics of biofluiddynamics can be found on the course web page.
227-0384-00LUltrasound Fundamentals, Imaging, and Medical Applications Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits3GO. Göksel
AbstractUltrasound is the only imaging modality that is nonionizing (safe), real-time, cost-effective, and portable, with many medical uses in diagnosis, intervention guidance, surgical navigation, and as a therapeutic option. In this course, we introduce conventional and prospective applications of ultrasound, starting with the fundamentals of ultrasound physics and imaging.
ObjectiveStudents can use the fundamentals of ultrasound, to analyze and evaluate ultrasound imaging techniques and applications, in particular in the field of medicine, as well as to design and implement basic applications.
ContentUltrasound is used in wide range of products, from car parking sensors, to assessing fault lines in tram wheels. Medical imaging is the eye of the doctor into body; and ultrasound is the only imaging modality that is nonionizing (safe), real-time, cheap, and portable. Some of its medical uses include diagnosing breast and prostate cancer, guiding needle insertions/biopsies, screening for fetal anomalies, and monitoring cardiac arrhythmias. Ultrasound physically interacts with the tissue, and thus can also be used therapeutically, e.g., to deliver heat to treat tumors, break kidney stones, and targeted drug delivery. Recent years have seen several novel ultrasound techniques and applications – with many more waiting in the horizon to be discovered.

This course covers ultrasonic equipment, physics of wave propagation, numerical methods for its simulation, image generation, beamforming (basic delay-and-sum and advanced methods), transducers (phased-, linear-, convex-arrays), near- and far-field effect, imaging modes (e.g., A-, M-, B-mode), Doppler and harmonic imaging, ultrasound signal processing techniques (e.g., filtering, time-gain-compensation, displacement tracking), image analysis techniques (deconvolution, real-time processing, tracking, segmentation, computer-assisted interventions), acoustic-radiation force, plane-wave imaging, contrast agents, micro-bubbles, elastography, biomechanical characterization, high-intensity focused ultrasound and therapy, lithotripsy, histotripsy, photo-acoustics phenomenon and opto-acoustic imaging, as well as sample non-medical applications such as the basics of non-destructive testing (NDT).

Hands-on exercises: These will help to apply the concepts learned in the course, using simulation environments (such as Matlab k-Wave and FieldII toolboxes). The exercises will involve a mix of design, implementation, and evaluation examples commonly encountered in practical applications.

Project: These will be part of the assessment in grading. Projects will be carried out throughout the course, individually or in small groups. Project reporting and presentations will be due at the end of the semester. Topics highly relevant in the field of ultrasound are offered as suggested projects. Students are also welcome to propose custom project topics of their own.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Familiarity with basic numerical methods.
Basic programming skills in Matlab.
227-0455-00LTerahertz: Technology & ApplicationsW5 credits3G + 3AK. Sankaran
AbstractThis block course will provide a solid foundation for understanding physical principles of THz applications. We will discuss various building blocks of THz technology - components dealing with generation, manipulation, and detection of THz electromagnetic radiation. We will introduce THz applications in the domain of imaging, communications, and energy harvesting.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course on Terahertz (THz) technology and applications. Devices operating in THz frequency range (0.1 to 10 THz) have been increasingly studied in the recent years. Progress in nonlinear optical materials, ultrafast optical and electronic techniques has strengthened research in THz application developments. Due to unique interaction of THz waves with materials, applications with new capabilities can be developed. In theory, they can penetrate somewhat like X-rays, but are not considered harmful radiation, because THz energy level is low. They should be able to provide resolution as good as or better than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), possibly with simpler equipment. Imaging, very-high bandwidth communication, and energy harvesting are the most widely explored THz application areas. We will study the basics of THz generation, manipulation, and detection. Our emphasis will be on the physical principles and applications of THz in the domain of imaging, communication and energy harvesting.

The second part of the block course will be a short project work related to the topics covered in the lecture. The learnings from the project work should be presented in the end.
ContentPART I:

- INTRODUCTION -
Chapter 1: Introduction to THz Physics
Chapter 2: Components of THz Technology

- THz TECHNOLOGY MODULES -
Chapter 3: THz Generation
Chapter 4: THz Detection
Chapter 5: THz Manipulation

- APPLICATIONS -
Chapter 6: THz Imaging
Chapter 7: THz Communication
Chapter 8: THz Energy Harvesting

PART 2:

- PROJECT WORK -
Short project work related to the topics covered in the lecture.
Short presentation of the learnings from the project work.
Full guidance and supervision will be given for successful completion of the short project work.
Lecture notesSoft-copy of lectures notes will be provided.
Literature- Yun-Shik Lee, Principles of Terahertz Science and Technology, Springer 2009
- Ali Rostami, Hassan Rasooli, and Hamed Baghban, Terahertz Technology: Fundamentals and Applications, Springer 2010
Prerequisites / NoticeGood foundation in electromagnetics is required.
Knowledge of microwave or optical communication is helpful, but not mandatory.
227-0945-10LCell and Molecular Biology for Engineers II
This course is part II of a two-semester course.
Knowledge of part I is required.
W3 credits2GC. Frei
AbstractThe course gives an introduction into cellular and molecular biology, specifically for students with a background in engineering. The focus will be on the basic organization of eukaryotic cells, molecular mechanisms and cellular functions. Textbook knowledge will be combined with results from recent research and technological innovations in biology.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, engineering students will be able to apply their previous training in the quantitative and physical sciences to modern biology. Students will also learn the principles how biological models are established, and how these models can be tested.
ContentLectures will include the following topics: DNA, chromosomes, RNA, protein, genetics, gene expression, membrane structure and function, vesicular traffic, cellular communication, energy conversion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, cellular growth, apoptosis, autophagy, cancer, development and stem cells.

In addition, 4 journal clubs will be held, where recent publications will be discussed (2 journal clubs in part I and 2 journal clubs in part II). For each journal club, students (alone or in groups of up to three students) have to write a summary and discussion of the publication. These written documents will be graded and count as 40% for the final grade.
Lecture notesScripts of all lectures will be available.
Literature"Molecular Biology of the Cell" (6th edition) by Alberts, Johnson, Lewis, Morgan, Raff, Roberts, and Walter.
227-0946-00LMolecular Imaging - Basic Principles and Biomedical ApplicationsW2 credits2VM. Rudin
AbstractConcept: What is molecular imaging.
Discussion/comparison of the various imaging modalities used in molecular imaging.
Design of target specific probes: specificity, delivery, amplification strategies.
Biomedical Applications.
ObjectiveMolecular Imaging is a rapidly emerging discipline that translates concepts developed in molecular biology and cellular imaging to in vivo imaging in animals and ultimatly in humans. Molecular imaging techniques allow the study of molecular events in the full biological context of an intact organism and will therefore become an indispensable tool for biomedical research.
ContentConcept: What is molecular imaging.
Discussion/comparison of the various imaging modalities used in molecular imaging.
Design of target specific probes: specificity, delivery, amplification strategies.
Biomedical Applications.
227-0948-00LMagnetic Resonance Imaging in MedicineW4 credits3GS. Kozerke, M. Weiger Senften
AbstractIntroduction to magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, encoding and contrast mechanisms and their application in medicine.
ObjectiveUnderstand the basic principles of signal generation, image encoding and decoding, contrast manipulation and the application thereof to assess anatomical and functional information in-vivo.
ContentIntroduction to magnetic resonance imaging including basic phenomena of nuclear magnetic resonance; 2- and 3-dimensional imaging procedures; fast and parallel imaging techniques; image reconstruction; pulse sequences and image contrast manipulation; equipment; advanced techniques for identifying activated brain areas; perfusion and flow; diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking; contrast agents; localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging; diagnostic applications and applications in research.
Lecture notesD. Meier, P. Boesiger, S. Kozerke
Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
376-1178-00LHuman Factors IIW3 credits2VM. Menozzi Jäckli, R. Huang, M. Siegrist
AbstractStrategies, abilities and needs of human at work as well as properties of products and systems are factors controlling quality and performance in everyday interactions. In Human Factors II (HF II), cognitive aspects are in focus therefore complementing the more physical oriented approach in HF I. A basic scientific approach is adopted and relevant links to practice are illustrated.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to empower students in designing products and systems enabling an efficient and qualitatively high standing interaction between human and the environment, considering costs, benefits, health, well-being, and safety as well. The goal is achieved in addressing a broad variety of topics and embedding the discussion in macroscopic factors such as the behavior of consumers and objectives of economy.
ContentCognitive factors in perception, information processing and action. Experimental techniques in assessing human performance and well-being, human factors and ergonomics in development of products and complex systems, innovation, decision taking, consumer behavior.
LiteratureSalvendy G. (ed), Handbook of Human Factors, Wiley & Sons, 2012
376-1217-00LRehabilitation Engineering I: Motor FunctionsW4 credits2V + 1UR. Riener, J. Duarte Barriga
Abstract“Rehabilitation engineering” is the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disabilities in order to reintegrate them into society. The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new rehabilitation engineering principles and examples applied to compensate or enhance especially motor deficits.
ObjectiveProvide theoretical and practical knowledge of principles and applications used to rehabilitate individuals with motor disabilities.
Content“Rehabilitation” is the (re)integration of an individual with a disability into society. Rehabilitation engineering is “the application of science and technology to ameliorate the handicaps of individuals with disability”. Such handicaps can be classified into motor, sensor, and cognitive (also communicational) disabilities. In general, one can distinguish orthotic and prosthetic methods to overcome these disabilities. Orthoses support existing but affected body functions (e.g., glasses, crutches), while prostheses compensate for lost body functions (e.g., cochlea implant, artificial limbs). In case of sensory disorders, the lost function can also be substituted by other modalities (e.g. tactile Braille display for vision impaired persons).

The goal of this lecture is to present classical and new technical principles as well as specific examples applied to compensate or enhance mainly motor deficits. Modern methods rely more and more on the application of multi-modal and interactive techniques. Multi-modal means that visual, acoustical, tactile, and kinaesthetic sensor channels are exploited by displaying the patient with a maximum amount of information in order to compensate his/her impairment. Interaction means that the exchange of information and energy occurs bi-directionally between the rehabilitation device and the human being. Thus, the device cooperates with the patient rather than imposing an inflexible strategy (e.g., movement) upon the patient. Multi-modality and interactivity have the potential to increase the therapeutical outcome compared to classical rehabilitation strategies.
In the 1 h exercise the students will learn how to solve representative problems with computational methods applied to exoprosthetics, wheelchair dynamics, rehabilitation robotics and neuroprosthetics.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed at the beginning of the lecture (1st session)
LiteratureIntroductory Books

Neural prostheses - replacing motor function after desease or disability. Eds.: R. Stein, H. Peckham, D. Popovic. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Advances in Rehabilitation Robotics – Human-Friendly Technologies on Movement Assistance and Restoration for People with Disabilities. Eds: Z.Z. Bien, D. Stefanov (Lecture Notes in Control and Information Science, No. 306). Springer Verlag Berlin 2004.

Intelligent Systems and Technologies in Rehabilitation Engineering. Eds: H.N.L. Teodorescu, L.C. Jain (International Series on Computational Intelligence). CRC Press Boca Raton, 2001.

Control of Movement for the Physically Disabled. Eds.: D. Popovic, T. Sinkjaer. Springer Verlag London, 2000.

Interaktive und autonome Systeme der Medizintechnik - Funktionswiederherstellung und Organersatz. Herausgeber: J. Werner, Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag 2005.

Biomechanics and Neural Control of Posture and Movement. Eds.: J.M. Winters, P.E. Crago. Springer New York, 2000.

Selected Journal Articles

Abbas, J., Riener, R. (2001) Using mathematical models and advanced control systems techniques to enhance neuroprosthesis function. Neuromodulation 4, pp. 187-195.

Burdea, G., Popescu, V., Hentz, V., and Colbert, K. (2000): Virtual reality-based orthopedic telerehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 8, pp. 430-432

Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Schreier, R., Dietz, V. (2000) Treadmill training of paraplegic patients using a robotic orthosis. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, vol. 37, pp. 693-700.

Colombo, G., Jörg, M., Jezernik, S. (2002) Automatisiertes Lokomotionstraining auf dem Laufband. Automatisierungstechnik at, vol. 50, pp. 287-295.

Cooper, R. (1993) Stability of a wheelchair controlled by a human. IEEE Transactions on Rehabilitation Engineering 1, pp. 193-206.

Krebs, H.I., Hogan, N., Aisen, M.L., Volpe, B.T. (1998): Robot-aided neurorehabilitation, IEEE Trans. Rehab. Eng., 6, pp. 75-87

Leifer, L. (1981): Rehabilitive robotics, Robot Age, pp. 4-11

Platz, T. (2003): Evidenzbasierte Armrehabilitation: Eine systematische Literaturübersicht, Nervenarzt, 74, pp. 841-849

Quintern, J. (1998) Application of functional electrical stimulation in paraplegic patients. NeuroRehabilitation 10, pp. 205-250.

Riener, R., Nef, T., Colombo, G. (2005) Robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the upper extremities. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing 43(1), pp. 2-10.

Riener, R., Fuhr, T., Schneider, J. (2002) On the complexity of biomechanical models used for neuroprosthesis development. International Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology 2, pp. 389-404.

Riener, R. (1999) Model-based development of neuroprostheses for paraplegic patients. Royal Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences 354, pp. 877-894.
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget Group:
Students of higher semesters and PhD students of
- D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-INFK
- Biomedical Engineering
- Medical Faculty, University of Zurich
Students of other departments, faculties, courses are also welcome
376-1308-00LDevelopment Strategies for Medical Implants Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25 until 30.
Assignments will be considered chronological.
W3 credits2V + 1UJ. Mayer-Spetzler, M. Rubert
AbstractIntroduction to development strategies for implantable devices considering the interdependecies of biocompatibility, clinical and economical requirements ; discussion of the state of the art and actual trends in in orthopedics, sports medicine, traumatology and cardio-vascular surgery as well as regenerative medicine (tissue engineering).
ObjectiveBasic considerations in implant development
Concept of structural and surface biocompatiblity and its relevance for the design of implant and surgical technique
Understanding of conflicting factors, e.g. clinical need, economics and regulatory requirements
Concepts of tissue engineering, its strengths and weaknesses as current and future clinical solution
ContentBiocompatibility as bionic guide line for the development of medical implants; implant and implantation related tissue reactions, biocompatible materials and material processing technologies; implant testing and regulatory procedures; discussion of the state of the art and actual trends in implant development in orthopedics, sports medicine, traumatology, spinal and cardio-vascular surgery; introduction to tissue engineering. Selected topics will be further illustrated by commented movies from surgeries.

Seminar:
Group seminars on selected controversial topics in implant development. Participation is mandatory

Planned excursions (limited availability, not mandatory, to be confirmed):
1. Participation (as visitor) on a life surgery (travel at own expense)
Lecture notesScribt (electronically available):
- presented slides
- selected scientific papers for further reading
LiteratureReference to key papers will be provided during the lectures
Prerequisites / NoticeAchieved Bachelor degree is mandatory

The number of participants in the course is limited to 25-30 students in total.

Students will be exposed to surgical movies which may cause emotional reactions. The viewing of the surgical movies is voluntary and is on the student's own responsability.
376-1392-00LMechanobiology: Implications for Development, Regeneration and Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2GA. Ferrari, K. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractThis course will emphasize the importance of mechanobiology to cell determination and behavior. Its importance to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will also be addressed. Finally, this course will discuss how age and disease adversely alter major mechanosensitive developmental programs.
ObjectiveThis course is designed to illuminate the importance of mechanobiological processes to life as well as to teach good experimental strategies to investigate mechanobiological phenomena.
ContentTypically, cell differentiation is studied under static conditions (cells grown on rigid plastic tissue culture dishes in two-dimensions), an experimental approach that, while simplifying the requirements considerably, is short-sighted in scope. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many tissues modulate their developmental programs to specifically match the mechanical stresses that they will encounter in later life. Examples of known mechanosensitive developmental programs include osteogenesis (bones), chondrogenesis (cartilage), and tendogenesis (tendons). Furthermore, general forms of cell behavior such as migration, extracellular matrix deposition, and complex tissue differentiation are also regulated by mechanical stimuli. Mechanically-regulated cellular processes are thus ubiquitous, ongoing and of great clinical importance.

The overall importance of mechanobiology to humankind is illustrated by the fact that nearly 80% of our entire body mass arises from tissues originating from mechanosensitive developmental programs, principally bones and muscles. Unfortunately, our ability to regenerate mechanosensitive tissue diminishes in later life. As it is estimated that the fraction of the western world population over 65 years of age will double in the next 25 years, an urgency in the global biomedical arena exists to better understand how to optimize complex tissue development under physiologically-relevant mechanical environments for purposes of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesn/a
LiteratureTopical Scientific Manuscripts
376-1397-00LOrthopaedic Biomechanics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 48.
W3 credits2GR. Müller, P. Atkins
AbstractThis course is aimed at studying the mechanical and structural engineering of the musculoskeletal system alongside the analysis and design of orthopaedic solutions to musculoskeletal failure.
ObjectiveTo apply engineering and design principles to orthopaedic biomechanics, to quantitatively assess the musculoskeletal system and model it, and to review rigid-body dynamics in an interesting context.
ContentEngineering principles are very important in the development and application of quantitative approaches in biology and medicine. This course includes a general introduction to structure and function of the musculoskeletal system: anatomy and physiology of musculoskeletal tissues and joints; biomechanical methods to assess and quantify tissues and large joint systems. These methods will also be applied to musculoskeletal failure, joint replacement and reconstruction; implants; biomaterials and tissue engineering.
Lecture notesStored on ILIAS.
LiteratureOrthopaedic Biomechanics:
Mechanics and Design in Musculoskeletal Systems

Authors: Donald L. Bartel, Dwight T. Davy, Tony M. Keaveny
Publisher: Prentice Hall; Copyright: 2007
ISBN-10: 0130089095; ISBN-13: 9780130089090
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures will be given in English.
376-1614-00LPrinciples in Tissue EngineeringW3 credits2VK. Maniura, J. Möller, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractFundamentals in blood coagulation; thrombosis, blood rheology, immune system, inflammation, foreign body reaction on the molecular level and the entire body are discussed. Applications of biomaterials for tissue engineering in different tissues are introduced. Fundamentals in medical implantology, in situ drug release, cell transplantation and stem cell biology are discussed.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of molecular aspects for the application of biodegradable and biocompatible Materials. Fundamentals of tissue reactions (eg. immune responses) against implants and possible clinical consequences will be discussed.
ContentThis class continues with applications of biomaterials and devices introduced in Biocompatible Materials I. Fundamentals in blood coagulation; thrombosis, blood rheology; immune system, inflammation, foreign body reaction on the level of the entire body and on the molecular level are introduced. Applications of biomaterials for tissue engineering in the vascular system, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, tendons and ligaments, bone, teeth, nerve and brain, and drug delivery systems are introduced. Fundamentals in medical implantology, in situ drug release, cell transplantation and stem cell biology are discussed.
Lecture notesHandouts provided during the classes and references therin.
LiteratureThe molecular Biology of the Cell, Alberts et al., 5th Edition, 2009.
Principles in Tissue Engineering, Langer et al., 2nd Edition, 2002
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