Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2019

MAS in Medizinphysik Information
Fachrichtung: Allg. Medizinphysik und Biomedizinisches Ingenieurwesen
Vertiefung Biomechanics
Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
376-1712-00LFinite Element Analysis in Biomedical Engineering Information W3 KP2VS. J. Ferguson, B. Helgason
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction to finite element analysis, with a specific focus on problems and applications from biomedical engineering.
LernzielFinite element analysis is a powerful simulation method for the (approximate) solution of boundary value problems. While its traditional roots are in the realm of structural engineering, the methods have found wide use in the biomedical engineering domain for the simulation of the mechanical response of the human body and medical devices. This course provides an introduction to finite element analysis, with a specific focus on problems and applications from biomedical engineering. This domain offers many unique challenges, including multi-scale problems, multi-physics simulation, complex and non-linear material behaviour, rate-dependent response, dynamic processes and fluid-solid interactions. Theories taught are reinforced through practical applications in self-programmed and commercial simulation software, using e.g. MATLAB, ANSYS, FEBIO.
Inhalt(Theory) The Finite Element and Finite Difference methods
Gallerkin, weighted residuals, discretization

(Theory) Mechanical analysis of structures
Trusses, beams, solids and shells, DOFs, hand calculations of simple FE problems, underlying PDEs

(Application) Mechanical analysis of structures
Truss systems, beam systems, 2D solids, meshing, organ level analysis of bones

(Theory and Application) Mechanical analysis of structures
Micro- and multi-scale analysis, voxel models, solver limitations, large scale solvers

(Theory) Non-linear mechanical analysis of structures
Large strain, Newton-Rhapson, plasticity

(Application) Non-linear mechanical analysis of structures
Plasticity (bone), hyperelasticity, viscoelasticity

(Theory and Application) Contact analysis
Friction, bonding, rough contact, implants, bone-cement composites, pushout tests

(Theory) Flow in Porous Media
Potential problems, Terzhagi's consolidation

(Application) Flow in Porous Media
Confined and unconfined compression of cartilage

(Theory) Heat Transfer and Mass Transport
Diffusion, conduction and convection, equivalency of equations

(Application) Heat Transfer and Mass Transport
Sequentially-coupled poroelastic and transport models for solute transport

(Theory) Computational Biofluid Dynamics
Newtonian vs. Non-Newtonian fluid, potential flow

(Application) Computational Biofluid Dynamics
Flow between micro-rough parallel plates
SkriptHandouts consisting of (i) lecturers' script, (ii) selected excerpts from relevant textbooks, (iii) selected excerpts from theory manuals of commercial simulation software, (iv) relevant scientific publications.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFamiliarity with basic numerical methods.
Programming experience with MATLAB.
376-1397-00LOrthopaedic Biomechanics Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 48.
W3 KP2GR. Müller, P. Atkins
KurzbeschreibungThis course is aimed at studying the mechanical and structural engineering of the musculoskeletal system alongside the analysis and design of orthopaedic solutions to musculoskeletal failure.
LernzielTo apply engineering and design principles to orthopaedic biomechanics, to quantitatively assess the musculoskeletal system and model it, and to review rigid-body dynamics in an interesting context.
InhaltEngineering principles are very important in the development and application of quantitative approaches in biology and medicine. This course includes a general introduction to structure and function of the musculoskeletal system: anatomy and physiology of musculoskeletal tissues and joints; biomechanical methods to assess and quantify tissues and large joint systems. These methods will also be applied to musculoskeletal failure, joint replacement and reconstruction; implants; biomaterials and tissue engineering.
SkriptStored on ILIAS.
LiteraturOrthopaedic Biomechanics:
Mechanics and Design in Musculoskeletal Systems

Authors: Donald L. Bartel, Dwight T. Davy, Tony M. Keaveny
Publisher: Prentice Hall; Copyright: 2007
ISBN-10: 0130089095; ISBN-13: 9780130089090
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesLectures will be given in English.
376-1392-00LMechanobiology: Implications for Development, Regeneration and Tissue EngineeringW3 KP2GA. Ferrari, K. Würtz-Kozak, M. Zenobi-Wong
KurzbeschreibungThis course will emphasize the importance of mechanobiology to cell determination and behavior. Its importance to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering will also be addressed. Finally, this course will discuss how age and disease adversely alter major mechanosensitive developmental programs.
LernzielThis course is designed to illuminate the importance of mechanobiological processes to life as well as to teach good experimental strategies to investigate mechanobiological phenomena.
InhaltTypically, cell differentiation is studied under static conditions (cells grown on rigid plastic tissue culture dishes in two-dimensions), an experimental approach that, while simplifying the requirements considerably, is short-sighted in scope. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many tissues modulate their developmental programs to specifically match the mechanical stresses that they will encounter in later life. Examples of known mechanosensitive developmental programs include osteogenesis (bones), chondrogenesis (cartilage), and tendogenesis (tendons). Furthermore, general forms of cell behavior such as migration, extracellular matrix deposition, and complex tissue differentiation are also regulated by mechanical stimuli. Mechanically-regulated cellular processes are thus ubiquitous, ongoing and of great clinical importance.

The overall importance of mechanobiology to humankind is illustrated by the fact that nearly 80% of our entire body mass arises from tissues originating from mechanosensitive developmental programs, principally bones and muscles. Unfortunately, our ability to regenerate mechanosensitive tissue diminishes in later life. As it is estimated that the fraction of the western world population over 65 years of age will double in the next 25 years, an urgency in the global biomedical arena exists to better understand how to optimize complex tissue development under physiologically-relevant mechanical environments for purposes of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.
Skriptn/a
LiteraturTopical Scientific Manuscripts
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