Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

DAS in Cyber Security Information
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-1414-00LSystem Security Information O5 credits2V + 2US. Capkun, A. Perrig
AbstractThe first part of the lecture covers individual system aspects starting with tamperproof or tamper-resistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems, such as host based intrusion detection systems. In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems.
ObjectiveIn this lecture, students learn about the security requirements and capabilities that are expected from modern hardware, operating systems, and other software environments. An overview of available technologies, algorithms and standards is given, with which these requirements can be met.
ContentThe first part of the lecture covers individual system's aspects starting with tamperproof or tamperresistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems such as host based intrusion detetction systems. The main topics covered are: tamper resistant hardware, CPU support for security, protection mechanisms in the kernel, file system security (permissions / ACLs / network filesystem issues), IPC Security, mechanisms in more modern OS, such as Capabilities and Zones, Libraries and Software tools for security assurance, etc.

In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems. Topics include: patch management, common software faults (buffer overflows, etc.), writing secure software (design, architecture, QA, testing), compiler-supported security, language-supported security, logging and auditing (BSM audit, dtrace, ...), cryptographic support, and trustworthy computing (TCG, SGX).

Along the lectures, model cases will be elaborated and evaluated in the exercises.
263-4640-00LNetwork Security Information O6 credits2V + 1U + 2AA. Perrig, S. Frei
AbstractSome of today's most damaging attacks on computer systems involve
exploitation of network infrastructure, either as the target of attack
or as a vehicle to attack end systems. This course provides an
in-depth study of network attack techniques and methods to defend
against them.
Objective- Students are familiar with fundamental network security concepts.
- Students can assess current threats that Internet services and networked devices face, and can evaluate appropriate countermeasures.
- Students can identify and assess known vulnerabilities in a software system that is connected to the Internet (through analysis and penetration testing tools).
- Students have an in-depth understanding of a range of important security technologies.
- Students learn how formal analysis techniques can help in the design of secure networked systems.
ContentThe course will cover topics spanning five broad themes: (1) network
defense mechanisms such as secure routing protocols, TLS, anonymous
communication systems, network intrusion detection systems, and
public-key infrastructures; (2) network attacks such as denial of
service (DoS) and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks; (3)
analysis and inference topics such as network forensics and attack
economics; (4) formal analysis techniques for verifying the security
properties of network architectures; and (5) new technologies related
to next-generation networks.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis lecture is intended for students with an interest in securing
Internet communication services and network devices. Students are
assumed to have knowledge in networking as taught in a Communication
Networks lecture. The course will involve a course project and some
smaller programming projects as part of the homework. Students are
expected to have basic knowledge in network programming in a
programming language such as C/C++, Go, or Python.
268-0101-00LIntroduction to Information Security Restricted registration - show details
Only for CAS and DAS in Cyber Security.
O6 credits4GP. Schaller
AbstractIn this course, the goal is to introduce the fundamentals of information/cyber security from a technical point of view. Along with theory, hands-on experiments are an important building block of the course and help to deepen the students’ understanding of the theory parts.
ObjectiveGraduates of the course know the technical foundations of information security and understand the difficulty and complexity involved when trying to build secure systems.
ContentIn this new course, the goal is to introduce the fundamentals of information/cyber security from a technical point of view. Along with theory, hands-on experiments are an important building block of the course and help to deepen the students’ understanding of the theory parts.
268-0102-00LApplied Security Laboratory Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for DAS in Cyber Security.
O5 credits3PD. Basin
AbstractHands-on course on applied aspects of information security. Applied
information security, operating system security, OS hardening, computer forensics, web application security, project work, design, implementation, and configuration of security mechanisms, risk analysis, system review.
ObjectiveThe Applied Security Laboratory addresses four major topics: operating system security (hardening, vulnerability scanning, access control, logging), application security with an emphasis on web applications (web server setup, common web exploits, authentication, session handling, code security), computer forensics, and risk analysis and risk management.
ContentThis course emphasizes applied aspects of Information Security. The students will study a number of topics in a hands-on fashion and carry out experiments in order to better understand the need for secure implementation and configuration of IT systems and to assess the effectivity and impact of security measures. This part is based on a book and virtual machines that include example applications, questions, and answers.

The students will also complete an independent project: based on a set of functional requirements, they will design and implement a prototypical IT system. In addition, they will conduct a thorough security analysis and devise appropriate security measures for their systems. Finally, they will carry out a technical and conceptual review of another system. All project work will be performed in teams and must be properly documented.
Lecture notesThe course is based on the book "Applied Information Security - A Hands-on Approach". More information: Link
LiteratureRecommended reading includes:
* Pfleeger, Pfleeger: Security in Computing, Third Edition, Prentice Hall, available online from within ETH
* Garfinkel, Schwartz, Spafford: Practical Unix & Internet Security, O'Reilly & Associates.
* Various: OWASP Guide to Building Secure Web Applications, available online
* Huseby: Innocent Code -- A Security Wake-Up Call for Web Programmers, John Wiley & Sons.
* Scambray, Schema: Hacking Exposed Web Applications, McGraw-Hill.
* O'Reilly, Loukides: Unix Power Tools, O'Reilly & Associates.
* Frisch: Essential System Administration, O'Reilly & Associates.
* NIST: Risk Management Guide for Information Technology Systems, available online as PDF
* BSI: IT-Grundschutzhandbuch, available online
Prerequisites / Notice* The lab allows flexible working since there are only few mandatory meetings during the semester.
* The lab covers a variety of different techniques. Thus, participating students should have a solid foundation in the following areas: information security, operating system administration (especially Unix/Linux), and networking. Students are also expected to have a basic understanding of HTML, PHP, JavaScript, and MySQL because several examples are implemented in these languages.
* Students must be prepared to spend more than three hours per week to complete the lab assignments and the project. This applies particularly to students who do not meet the recommended requirements given above. Successful participants of the course receive 8 credits as compensation for their effort.
* All participants must sign the lab's charter and usage policy during the introduction lecture.
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