Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Mechanical Engineering Bachelor Information
5. Semester
Focus Specialization
Management, Technology and Economics
Focus Coordinators: Prof. Stefano Brusoni D-MTEC and Dr. Jost Hamschmidt D-MTEC
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0733-00LForming Technology III - Forming ProcessesW4 credits2V + 2UP. Hora
AbstractThe lecture teaches on the basic knowledge of major processes in sheet metal, tube and bulk metal forming technologies. In particular it focuses on fundamental computation methods, which allow a fast assessment of process behaviour and a rough layout. Process-specific states of stress and deformation are analysed and process limits are identified.
ObjectiveAcquaintance with forming processes. Determination of forming processes. Interpretation of forming manufacturing
ContentThe study of metal working processes: sheet metal forming, folding die cutting, cold bulk metal forming, ro extrusion, plunging, open die forging, drop forging, milling; active principle; elementary methods to estimate stress and strain; fundamentals of process design; manufacturing limits and machining accuracy; tools and operation; machinery and machine usage.
Lecture notesja
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC. This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01.
W3 credits3GB. Clarysse, M. Ambühl, S. Brusoni, E. Fleisch, G. Grote, V. Hoffmann, T. Netland, G. von Krogh, F. von Wangenheim
AbstractDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
ObjectiveDiscovering Management combines in an innovate format a set of lectures and an advanced business game. The learning model for Discovering Management involves 'learning by doing'. The objective is to introduce the students to the relevant topics of the management literature and give them a good introduction in entrepreneurship topics too. The course is a series of lectures on the topics of strategy, innovation, corporate finance, leadership, design thinking and corporate social responsibility. While the 14 different lectures provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations, the experiential learning outcomes result from the interactive business game. The purpose of the business game is to analyse the innovative needs of a large multinational company and develop a business case for the company to grow. This business case is as relevant to someone exploring innovation within an organisation as it is if you are planning to start your own business. By discovering the key aspects of entrepreneurial management, the purpose of the course is to advance students' understanding of factors driving innovation, entrepreneurship, and company success.
ContentDiscovering Management aims to broaden the students' understanding of the principles of business management, emphasizing the interdependence of various topics in the development and management of a firm. The lectures introduce students not only to topics relevant for managing large corporations, but also touch upon the different aspects of starting up your own venture. The lectures will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The course broadens the view and understanding of technology by linking it with its commercial applications and with society. The lectures are designed to introduce students to topics related to strategy, corporate innovation, leadership, corporate and entrepreneurial finance, value chain analysis, corporate social responsibility, and business model innovation. Practical examples from industry experts will stimulate the students to critically assess these issues. Creative skills will be trained by the business game exercise, a participant-centered learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of Chief Innovation Officer of a large multinational company. As they learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with, the students will have to develop an innovative business case for this multinational corporation. Doing so, this exercise will provide an insight into the context of managerial problem-solving and corporate innovation, and enhance the students' appreciation for the complex tasks companies and managers deal with. The business game presents a realistic model of a company and provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyse the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
Prerequisites / NoticeDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
351-0778-01LDiscovering Management (Exercises)
Complementary exercises for the module Discovering Managment.

Prerequisite: Participation and successful completion of the module Discovering Management (351-0778-00L) is mandatory.
W1 credit1UB. Clarysse, L. De Cuyper
AbstractThis course is offered complementary to the basis course 351-0778-00L, "Discovering Management". The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
ObjectiveThis course is offered to complement the course 351-0778-00L. The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
ContentThe course offers additional exercises and case studies concering:
Strategic Management; Technology and Innovation Management; Operations and Supply Chain Management; Finance and Accounting; Marketing and Sales.

Please refer to the course website for further information on the content, credit conditions and schedule of the module: Link
363-0387-00LCorporate SustainabilityW3 credits2GV. Hoffmann
AbstractThe lecture explores current challenges of corporate sustainability and prepares students to become champions for sustainable business practices. In the beginning, traditional lectures are complemented by e-modules that allow students to train critical thinking skills. In the 2nd half of the semester, students work in teams on sustainability challenges related to water, energy, mobility, and food.
ObjectiveStudents
- assess the limits and the potential of corporate sustainability for sustainable development
- develop critical thinking skills (argumentation, communication, evaluative judgment) that are useful in the context of corporate sustainability using an innovative writing and peer review method.
- recognize and realize opportunities through team work for corporate sustainability in a business environment
- present strategic recommendations in teams with different output formats (tv-style debate, consultancy pitch, technology model walk-through, campaign video)
ContentIn the first part of the semester, Prof. Volker Hoffmann will share his insights on corporate sustainability with you through a series of lectures. They introduce you to a series of critical thinking exercises and build a foundation for your group work. In the second part of the semester, you participate in one of four tracks in which SusTec researchers will coach your groups through a seven-step program. Our ambition is that you improve your analytic and organizational skills and that you can confidently stand up for corporate sustainability in a professional setting. You will share the final product of your work with fellow students in a final puzzle session at the end of the semester.

Link
Lecture notesPresentation slides will be made available on moodle prior to lectures.
LiteratureLiterature recommendations will be distributed during the lecture
363-0389-00LTechnology and Innovation Management Information W3 credits2GS. Brusoni
AbstractThis course focuses on the analysis of innovation as a pervasive process that cut across organizational and functional boundaries. It looks at the sources of innovation, at the tools and techniques that organizations deploy to routinely innovate, and the strategic implications of technical change.
ObjectiveThis course intends to enable all students to:

- understand the core concepts necessary to analyze how innovation happens

- master the most common methods and tools organizations deploy to innovate

- develop the ability to critically evaluate the innovation process, and act upon the main obstacles to innovation
ContentThis course looks at technology and innovation management as a process. Continuously, organizations are faced with a fundamental decision: they have to allocate resources between well-known tasks that reliably generate positive results; or explore new ways of doing things, new technologies, products and services. The latter is a high risk choice. Its rewards can be high, but the chances of success are small.
How do firms organize to take these decisions? What kind of management skills are necessary to take them? What kind of tools and methods are deployed to sustain managerial decision-making in highly volatile environments? These are the central questions on which this course focuses, relying on a combination of lectures, case-based discussion, guest speakers, simulations and group work.
Lecture notesSlides will be available on the Moodle page
LiteratureReadings will be available on the Moodle page
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course content and methods are designed for students with some background in management and/or economics
363-0389-02LTechnology and Innovation Management (Additional Cases) Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for Mechanical Engineering BSc.
W1 credit1US. Brusoni
AbstractThis module focuses on the topics that lie at the intersection between management and engineering.
ObjectiveThrough a project, the students will focus on discussing the business implications of a technology using the tools and theories used in the TIM lecture. This would enable the students to deepen their understanding of managerial issues while focusing on a specific technology. Topics for project work will be proposed in the beginning of the semester
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture 363-0389-00L Technology and Innovation Management needs to be taken in order to participate in this module
363-0445-00LProduction and Operations ManagementW+3 credits2GT. Netland
AbstractThis core course on Production and Operations Management provides the students insights into the basic theories, principles, concepts, and techniques used to design, analyze, and improve the operational capabilities of an organization.
ObjectiveThis POM core course provides students a broad theoretical basis for understanding, analyzing, designing, and improving operations. After completing this course:
1. Students can apply key concepts of operations strategy for analyzing production processes.
2. Students can conduct basic process mapping analysis and elaborate the limitations of the chosen method.
3. Students can calculate the needed capacity for production and service operations.
4. Students can select and use problem solving tools and methods.
5. Students can select and use the basic tools of lean thinking to improve the productivity of production and service operations.
6. Students can explain how new technologies and servitization affect production and operations management.
7. Additional skills: Students acquire experience in teamwork, report writing and presentation.
ContentThe course covers the most fundamental strategic and tactical concepts in production and operations management. The lectures cover: Introduction to POM; Operations strategy; Capacity management; Production planning and control; Lean management; Performance measurement; Problem solving; Service operations and servitization; New technologies in POM.
LiteraturePaton, S.; Clegg, B.; Hsuan, J.; Pilkington, A. (2011) Operations Management, 1st ed., McGraw Hill.
363-0445-02LProduction and Operations Management (Additional Cases)W+1 credit2AT. Netland
AbstractExtension to course 363-0445-00 Production and Operations Management.
ObjectiveExtension to course 363-0445-00 Production and Operations Management.
ContentAdditional cases to course 363-0445-00 Production and Operations Management.
Prerequisites / NoticeA parallel enrolment to the lecture 363-0445-00L Production and Operations Management is mandatory.
363-0541-00LSystems Dynamics and ComplexityW+3 credits3GF. Schweitzer, G. Casiraghi, V. Nanumyan
AbstractFinding solutions: what is complexity, problem solving cycle.

Implementing solutions: project management, critical path method, quality control feedback loop.

Controlling solutions: Vensim software, feedback cycles, control parameters, instabilities, chaos, oscillations and cycles, supply and demand, production functions, investment and consumption
ObjectiveA successful participant of the course is able to:
- understand why most real problems are not simple, but require solution methods that go beyond algorithmic and mathematical approaches
- apply the problem solving cycle as a systematic approach to identify problems and their solutions
- calculate project schedules according to the critical path method
- setup and run systems dynamics models by means of the Vensim software
- identify feedback cycles and reasons for unintended systems behavior
- analyse the stability of nonlinear dynamical systems and apply this to macroeconomic dynamics
ContentWhy are problems not simple? Why do some systems behave in an unintended way? How can we model and control their dynamics? The course provides answers to these questions by using a broad range of methods encompassing systems oriented management, classical systems dynamics, nonlinear dynamics and macroeconomic modeling.
The course is structured along three main tasks:
1. Finding solutions
2. Implementing solutions
3. Controlling solutions

PART 1 introduces complexity as a system immanent property that cannot be simplified. It introduces the problem solving cycle, used in systems oriented management, as an approach to structure problems and to find solutions.

PART 2 discusses selected problems of project management when implementing solutions. Methods for identifying the critical path of subtasks in a project and for calculating the allocation of resources are provided. The role of quality control as an additional feedback loop and the consequences of small changes are discussed.

PART 3, by far the largest part of the course, provides more insight into the dynamics of existing systems. Examples come from biology (population dynamics), management (inventory modeling, technology adoption, production systems) and economics (supply and demand, investment and consumption). For systems dynamics models, the software program VENSIM is used to evaluate the dynamics. For economic models analytical approaches, also used in nonlinear dynamics and control theory, are applied. These together provide a systematic understanding of the role of feedback loops and instabilities in the dynamics of systems. Emphasis is on oscillating phenomena, such as business cycles and other life cycles.

Weekly self-study tasks are used to apply the concepts introduced in the lectures and to come to grips with the software program VENSIM.
Lecture notesThe lecture slides are provided as handouts - including notes and literature sources - to registered students only. All material is to be found on the Moodle platform. More details during the first lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeSelf-study tasks (discussion exercises, Vensim exercises) are provided as home work. Weekly exercise sessions (45 min) are used to discuss selected solutions. Regular participation in the exercises is an efficient way to understand the concepts relevant for the final exam.
363-0541-02LSystems Dynamics and Complexity (Additional Cases) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Mechanical Engineering BSc.
W+1 creditF. Schweitzer
AbstractThis module is an addition to the course Systems Dynamics and Complexity. It offers additional study cases to MAVT Bachelor students who enroll in the main course.
ObjectiveMAVT Bachelor students learn how to develop and analyze more sophisticated systems dynamics models from different areas, e.g. from biology (population dynamics, cooperation), management (inventory modeling, technology adoption and economics (supply and demand, investment and consumption), to name but a few. The goal is to apply analytical and numeric techniques to gain a deeper understanding of the dynamics of complex systems.
Content1. Modelling path dependence and formation of standards
- Why do clocks go clockwise? Why do people in most nations drive on the right? Why do nearly all computer keyboards have the QWERTY layout, even though it is more inefficient compared to DVORAK? It turns out that many real-world processes are path depended, i.e. small random events early in their history determine the ultimate end state, even when all end states are equally likely at the beginning. Students will learn how to model such processes, to understand the feedback mechanisms that lead to path dependence. As a case in point, we will study the 'war' between the Betamax and the VHS standards.

2. Optimal migration as promoter of cooperation
- Mechanisms to promote cooperative behaviour is a vibrant research topic in various fields - economics, evolutionary biology and management science to name but a few. Students will be introduced to one such mechanism - migration. They will develop and analyse a macroscopic model to study how the rate of migration affects the long-term cooperation rate in a population.

3. Information transfer
- Information flow in a social system (e.g. about the location of resources or appearance of a competitor) is an important component of group living. For example, it is well known that ants can achieve remarkable feats in finding an optimal route to a food patch through pheromone trails. The goal of this study case is to model information transfer in such systems by investigating the dynamics of trail formation in ants. The students will learn that the complexity in navigating to a food source may nevertheless be explained as a simple dynamical system with one control parameter only.

4. Decisions in social societies
- In many situations individuals have to decide between two or more options. Such decisions often have a profound impact on the system as a whole, especially regarding group cohesion. Group cohesion is preferred, as individuals can benefit from living in groups, yet it may not be the underlying reason behind individual choices. In this case, students will develop and extend a macroscopic model of an animal social system faced with a decision to choose a new home, and identify the conditions which promote group cohesion versus group splitting.

5. Antigenic variation of HIV
- One of the characteristic traits of HIV is that a host can be a carrier and a transmitter of the virus without experiencing symptoms for up to 10 years. This case is concerned with finding the mechanism of HIV disease progression. The students will develop a general population-based model for the interaction of an infectious agent with the host immune system. The model is applicable to a variety of infectious agents, ranging from acute lethal infections to chronic illness. Through analysing and simulating the model, the students will understand how the HIV virus interacts with the host and how the mutation rate of the virus is ultimately responsible for this long asymptomatic period.

6. Compartmental models in epidemiology
- Many diffusive processes in social systems, such as epidemics, can be understood as a result of the interaction between a few groups (compartments) of individuals. The most common example is to divide a population into those who are susceptible (S) to a disease, those who are infected (I), and those who have recovered (R) and are immune, and to model their interactions. These so called SIR models find wide application in studying non-biological diffusive processes, e.g. spread of technological innovations, fads , internet memes etc. In this study case, students will become familiar with the basic components of an SIR model and the conditions under which a disease can cause the outbreak of an epidemic. Students will extend the basic model to investigate more realistic scenarios relevant to e.g. different vaccination strategies.
Lecture notesWill be provided
363-0565-00LPrinciples of MacroeconomicsW3 credits2VJ.‑E. Sturm
AbstractThis course examines the behaviour of macroeconomic variables, such as gross domestic product, unemployment and inflation rates. It tries to answer questions like: How can we explain fluctuations of national economic activity? What can economic policy do against unemployment and inflation. What significance do international economic relations have for Switzerland?
ObjectiveThis lecture will introduce the fundamentals of macroeconomic theory and explain their relevance to every-day economic problems.
ContentThis course helps you understand the world in which you live. There are many questions about the macroeconomy that might spark your curiosity. Why are living standards so meagre in many African countries? Why do some countries have high rates of inflation while others have stable prices? Why have some European countries adopted a common currency? These are just a few of the questions that this course will help you answer.
Furthermore, this course will give you a better understanding of the potential and limits of economic policy. As a voter, you help choose the policies that guide the allocation of society's resources. When deciding which policies to support, you may find yourself asking various questions about economics. What are the burdens associated with alternative forms of taxation? What are the effects of free trade with other countries? What is the best way to protect the environment? How does the government budget deficit affect the economy? These and similar questions are always on the minds of policy makers.
Lecture notesThe course webpage (to be found at Link) contains announcements, course information and lecture slides.
LiteratureThe set-up of the course will closely follow the book of
N. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2017), Economics, Cengage Learning, Fourth Edition.

We advise you to also buy access to Aplia. This internet platform will support you in learning for this course. To save money, you should buy the book together with Aplia. This is sold as a bundle (ISBN: 978-1-473762008).

Besides this textbook, the slides and lecture notes will cover the content of the lecture and the exam questions.
363-1109-00LIntroduction to MicroeconomicsW3 credits2GM. Wörter, M. Beck
AbstractThe course introduces basic principles, problems and approaches of microeconomics. It describes economic decisions of households and firms, and their coordination through perfectly competitive markets.
ObjectiveStudents acquire a deeper understanding of basic microeconomic models.

They acquire the ability to apply these models in the interpretation of real world economic contexts.

Students acquire a reflective and contextual knowledge on how societies use scarce resources to produce goods and services and distribute them among themselves.
ContentMarket, budget constraint, preferences, utility function, utility maximisation, demand, technology, profit function, cost minimisation, cost functions, perfect competition, information and communication technologies
Lecture notesCourse material in e-learning environment Link
LiteratureVarian, Hal R. (2014), Intermediate Microeconomics, W.W. Norton
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course "Einführung in die Mikroökonomie“ (363-1109-00L) is intended for Bachelor students and LE 363-0503-00 "Principles of Microeconomics" for Master students.
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