Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Computer Science Master Information
Focus Courses
Focus Courses in Visual Computing
Focus Elective Courses Visual Computing
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-0527-00LProbabilistic Graphical Models for Image Analysis Information W4 credits3GS. Bauer
AbstractThis course will focus on the algorithms for inference and learning with statistical models. We use a framework called probabilistic graphical models which include Bayesian Networks and Markov Random Fields.

We will use examples from traditional vision problems such as image registration and image segmentation, as well as recent problems such as object recognition.
ObjectiveStudents will be introduced to probablistic graphical models and will learn how to apply them to problems in image analysis and understanding. The focus will be to study various algorithms for inference and parameter learning.
LiteratureWill be announced during the lecture.
252-0543-01LComputer Graphics Information W6 credits3V + 2UM. Gross, J. Novak
AbstractThis course covers some of the fundamental concepts of computer graphics, namely 3D object representations and generation of photorealistic images from digital representations of 3D scenes.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students will be able to build a rendering system. The students will study the basic principles of rendering and image synthesis. In addition, the course is intended to stimulate the students' curiosity to explore the field of computer graphics in subsequent courses or on their own.
ContentThis course covers fundamental concepts of modern computer graphics. Students will learn about 3D object representations and the details of how to generate photorealistic images from digital representations of 3D scenes. Starting with an introduction to 3D shape modeling and representation, texture mapping and ray-tracing, we will move on to acceleration structures, the physics of light transport, appearance modeling and global illumination principles and algorithms. We will end with an overview of modern image-based image synthesis techniques, covering topics such as lightfields and depth-image based rendering.
Lecture notesno
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Fundamentals of calculus and linear algebra, basic concepts of algorithms and data structures, programming skills in C++, Visual Computing course recommended.
The programming assignments will be in C++. This will not be taught in the class.
252-0546-00LPhysically-Based Simulation in Computer Graphics Information W4 credits2V + 1UM. Bächer, V. da Costa de Azevedo, B. Solenthaler
AbstractThis lecture provides an introduction to physically-based animation in computer graphics and gives an overview of fundamental methods and algorithms. The practical exercises include three assignments which are to be solved in small groups. In an addtional course project, topics from the lecture will be implemented into a 3D game or a comparable application.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides an introduction to physically-based animation in computer graphics and gives an overview of fundamental methods and algorithms. The practical exercises include three assignments which are to be solved in small groups. In an addtional course project, topics from the lecture will be implemented into a 3D game or a comparable application.
ContentThe lecture covers topics in physically-based modeling,
such as particle systems, mass-spring models, finite difference and finite element methods. These approaches are used to represent and simulate deformable objects or fluids with applications in animated movies, 3D games and medical systems. Furthermore, the lecture covers topics such as rigid body dynamics, collision detection, and character animation.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of calculus and physics, basic concepts of algorithms and data structures, basic programming skills in C++. Knowledge on numerical mathematics as well as ordinary and partial differential equations is an asset, but not required.
263-2400-00LReliable and Interpretable Artificial Intelligence Information W4 credits2V + 1UM. Vechev
AbstractCreating reliable and explainable probabilistic models is a fundamental challenge to solving the artificial intelligence problem. This course covers some of the latest and most exciting advances that bring us closer to constructing such models.
ObjectiveThe main objective of this course is to expose students to the latest and most exciting research in the area of explainable and interpretable artificial intelligence, a topic of fundamental and increasing importance. Upon completion of the course, the students should have mastered the underlying methods and be able to apply them to a variety of problems.

To facilitate deeper understanding, an important part of the course will be a group hands-on programming project where students will build a system based on the learned material.
ContentThe course covers the following inter-connected directions.

Part I: Robust and Explainable Deep Learning
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Deep learning technology has made impressive advances in recent years. Despite this progress however, the fundamental challenge with deep learning remains that of understanding what a trained neural network has actually learned, and how stable that solution is. Forr example: is the network stable to slight perturbations of the input (e.g., an image)? How easy it is to fool the network into mis-classifying obvious inputs? Can we guide the network in a manner beyond simple labeled data?

Topics:
- Attacks: Finding adversarial examples via state-of-the-art attacks (e.g., FGSM, PGD attacks).
- Defenses: Automated methods and tools which guarantee robustness of deep nets (e.g., using abstract domains, mixed-integer solvers)
- Combing differentiable logic with gradient-based methods so to train networks to satisfy richer properties.
- Frameworks: AI2, DiffAI, Reluplex, DQL, DeepPoly, etc.

Part II: Program Synthesis/Induction
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Synthesis is a new frontier in AI where the computer programs itself via user provided examples. Synthesis has significant applications for non-programmers as well as for programmers where it can provide massive productivity increase (e.g., wrangling for data scientists). Modern synthesis techniques excel at learning functions over discrete spaces from (partial) intent. There have been a number of recent, exciting breakthroughs in techniques that discover complex, interpretable/explainable functions from few examples, partial sketches and other forms of supervision.

Topics:
- Theory of program synthesis: version spaces, counter-example guided inductive synthesis (CEGIS) with SAT/SMT, lower bounds on learning.
- Applications of techniques: synthesis for end users (e.g., spreadsheets) and data analytics.
- Combining synthesis with learning: application to learning from code.
- Frameworks: PHOG, DeepCode.

Part III: Probabilistic Programming
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Probabilistic programming is an emerging direction, recently also pushed by various companies (e.g., Facebook, Uber, Google) whose goal is democratize the construction of probabilistic models. In probabilistic programming, the user specifies a model while inference is left to the underlying solver. The idea is that the higher level of abstraction makes it easier to express, understand and reason about probabilistic models.

Topics:

- Probabilistic Inference: sampling based, exact symbolic inference, semantics
- Applications of probabilistic programming: bias in deep learning, differential privacy (connects to Part I).
- Frameworks: PSI, Edward2, Venture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course material is self-contained: needed background is covered in the lectures and exercises, and additional pointers.
263-5210-00LProbabilistic Artificial Intelligence Information W4 credits2V + 1UA. Krause
AbstractThis course introduces core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet.
ObjectiveHow can we build systems that perform well in uncertain environments and unforeseen situations? How can we develop systems that exhibit "intelligent" behavior, without prescribing explicit rules? How can we build systems that learn from experience in order to improve their performance? We will study core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet. The course is designed for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students.
ContentTopics covered:
- Search (BFS, DFS, A*), constraint satisfaction and optimization
- Tutorial in logic (propositional, first-order)
- Probability
- Bayesian Networks (models, exact and approximative inference, learning) - Temporal models (Hidden Markov Models, Dynamic Bayesian Networks)
- Probabilistic palnning (MDPs, POMPDPs)
- Reinforcement learning
- Combining logic and probability
Prerequisites / NoticeSolid basic knowledge in statistics, algorithms and programming
263-5701-00LVisualization Information W4 credits2V + 1UT. Günther
AbstractThis lecture provides an introduction into visualization of scientific and abstract data.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides an introduction into the visualization of scientific and abstract data. The lecture introduces into the two main branches of visualization: scientific visualization and information visualization. The focus is set onto scientific data, demonstrating the usefulness and necessity of computer graphics in other fields than the entertainment industry. The exercises contain theoretical tasks on the mathematical foundations such as numerical integration, differential vector calculus, and flow field analysis, while programming exercises familiarize with the Visualization Tool Kit (VTK). In a course project, the learned methods are applied to visualize one real scientific data set. The provided data sets contain measurements of volcanic eruptions, galaxy simulations, fluid simulations, meteorological cloud simulations and asteroid impact simulations.
ContentThis lecture opens with human cognition basics, and scalar and vector calculus. Afterwards, this is applied to the visualization of air and fluid flows, including geometry-based, topology-based and feature-based methods. Further, the direct and indirect visualization of volume data is discussed. The lecture ends on the viualization of abstract, non-spatial and multi-dimensional data by means of information visualization.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of differential calculus. Knowledge on numerical mathematics, computer algebra systems, as well as ordinary and partial differential equations is an asset, but not required.
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