Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Food Science Master Information
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
752-1000-AALFood Chemistry I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RL. Nyström
AbstractTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ObjectiveTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ContentDescriptive chemistry of food constituents (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, plant phenolics, flavour compounds).
Reactions which affect the colour, flavour, texture, and the nutritional value of food raw materials and food products during processing, storage and preparation in a positive or in a negative way (e.g. lipid oxidation, Maillard reaction, enzymatic browning).
Links to food analysis, food processing, and nutrition.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
LiteratureIntroductory Food Chemistry, John W. Brady, Cornell University Press, New York, 2013. Selected sections.
752-1101-AALFood Analysis I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RL. Nyström
AbstractTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ObjectiveTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ContentFundamentals: Chemical concentrations. The analytical process (sampling, sample preparation, calibration, measurement, statistical evaluation of analytical results). Errors in quantitative analysis. Important parameters of an analytical procedure (accuracy, precision, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity/selectivity).

Methods: Optical spectroscopy (basic principles, UV/VIS, IR, and atomic absorption spectroscopy). Chromatography (GC, HPLC).
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
LiteratureFood Analysis - Fourth Edition, edited by S. Suzanne Nielson; 2010; Springer, Selected sections.
752-3000-AALFood Process Engineering I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RE. J. Windhab
AbstractTo procure students with the basic physics of food process engineering, especially with the mechanical futures of food systems, i.e. basic principles of engineering mechanics, of thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and of dimension analyses for process design and Non-Newtonian fluid mechanics.
Objective1. Verständnis der Grundprinzipien der Thermodynamik, Fluiddynamik und ingenieurtechnischen Apparateauslegung. 2. Anwendung dieser Prinzipien auf Prozesse der Lebensmittelverfahrenstechnik.3. Molekulares Verständnis der Fliesseigenschaften von Lebensmittelsystemen mit nicht-Newtonschem Fliessverhalten.
Content1. Einführung 2. Grundlagen der Fluiddynamik 3. Grundlagen derThermodynamik 4. Grundlagen der Mechanik 5. Austausch und Transportvorgänge 6. Grundlagen der Ingenieurtechnischen Apparateauslegung 7. Grundlagen der Rheologie 8. Grundlagen der Schüttgutmechanik
Literature- P. Grassmann: Einführung in die thermische Verfahrenstechnik, deGruyter Berlin, 1997 - H.D. Baehr: Thermodynamik, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1984
752-6306-AALPhysiology and Anatomy II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RW. Langhans
AbstractImparts a basic understanding of physiology and anatomy in man, focusing on the close interrelations between morphology and function of the human organism. This is fostered by discussing all subjects from a functional point of view. A major topic of the lecture is food intake and digestion with its correlated endocrine and metabolic processes.
ObjectiveAfter this course the students are able to understand basic principles of systems physiology and the mechanisms of the function of the major organ systems.
752-6001-AALIntroduction to Nutritional Science
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. B. Zimmermann, C. Wolfrum
AbstractThis course introduces basic concepts of micro- and macronutrient nutrition. Micronutrients studied include fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins, minerals and trace elements. Macronutrients include proteins, fat and carbohydrates. Special attention is given to nutrient digestion, bioavailability, metabolism and excretion with some focus on energy metabolism.
ObjectiveTo introduce the students to the both macro- and micronutrients in relation to food and metabolism.
ContentThis is a self-study course.
The course is devided into two parts: micronutrients are given by and macronutrients a. The micronutrients include fat-soluble vitamins, water-soluble vitamins, minerals and trace elements. The part on macronutrients introduces basic nutritional aspects of proteins, fats, carbohydrates and energy metabolism.
Lecture notesA reading list will be provided to the students detailing chapters and lecture slides to be studied
LiteraturePresent Knowledge in Nutrition; Edited by: J.W. Erdman Jr., I.A. Macdonald and S.H. Zeisel; 10th edition; International Life Sciences Institute; ISBN 978-0-470-95917-6
551-0001-AALGeneral Biology I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RU. Sauer, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractOrganismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.
ObjectiveThe understanding of basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.
ContentThe first semester focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2015) Biology - A Global Approach. 10th Edition (Global Edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a virtual self-study lecture for non-german speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology I (551-0001-00L) lecture. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.

Example exam questions will be discussed during the lectures, and old exam questions are kept by the various student organisations. If necessary, please contact Prof. Uwe Sauer (Link) for details regarding the exam.
406-0063-AALPhysics II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Refregier
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics. The Chapters treated are Magnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts used in the theory of heat and electricity.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
17 (without 17-5, 17-10), 18 (without 18-5, 18-6, 18-7), 19, 20 (without 20-7, 20-8, 20-9, 20-10, 20-11), 21 (without 21-12), 23, 25 (without 25-9, 25-10), 26 (without 26-4, 26-5, 26-7), 27, 28 (without 28-4, 28-5, 28-8. 28-9, 28-10), 29 (without 29-5, 29-8), 32 (without 32-8), 33 (without 33-4, 33-5, 33-9, 33-10), 34 (without 34-4, 34-6, 34-7), 35 (without 35-2, 35-3, 35-9, 35-11, 35-12, 35-13).
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Verlag Wiley-VCH, 2003, Fr. 77.-
406-0603-AALStochastics (Probability and Statistics)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RM. Kalisch
AbstractIntroduction to basic methods and fundamental concepts of statistics and probability theory for non-mathematicians. The concepts are presented on the basis of some descriptive examples. Learning the statistical program R for applying the acquired concepts will be a central theme.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to build a solid fundament in probability and statistics. The student should understand some fundamental concepts and be able to apply these concepts to applications in the real world. Furthermore, the student should have a basic knowledge of the statistical programming language "R".
ContentFrom "Statistics for research" (online)
Ch 1: The Role of Statistics
Ch 2: Populations, Samples, and Probability Distributions
Ch 3: Binomial Distributions
Ch 6: Sampling Distribution of Averages
Ch 7: Normal Distributions
Ch 8: Student's t Distribution
Ch 9: Distributions of Two Variables

From "Introductory Statistics with R (online)"
Ch 1: Basics
Ch 2: The R Environment
Ch 3: Probability and distributions
Ch 4: Descriptive statistics and tables
Ch 5: One- and two-sample tests
Ch 6: Regression and correlation
Literature- "Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et. al. (3rd
edition); Print ISBN: 9780471267355; Online ISBN: 9780471477433; DOI:
10.1002/0471477435
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link

- "Introductory Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard; ISBN
978-0-387-79053-4; DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79054-1
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link
752-4001-AALMicrobiology Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RM. Ackermann
AbstractSelf-study course in microbiology.
ObjectiveTeaching of basic knowledge in microbiology.
ContentThis is a self-study course for students with microbiology as an admission requirement. The goal of the course is that students acquire basics in microbiology, including bacterial cell biology, genetics, growth and physiology, metabolism, phylogeny and microbial diversity, and applications of microbiology.
LiteratureThis self-study course is based on the book 'Brock, Biology of Microorganisms'.
701-0071-AALMathematics III: Systems Analysis
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RN. Gruber
AbstractThe objective of the systems analysis course is to deepen and illustrate the mathematical concepts on the basis of a series of very concrete examples. Topics covered include: linear box models with one or several variables, non-linear box models with one or several variables, time-discrete models, and continuous models in time and space.
ObjectiveLearning and applying of concepts (models) and quantitative methods to address concrete problems of environmental relevance. Understanding and applying the systems-analytic approach, i.e., Recognizing the core of the problem - simplification - quantitative approach - prediction.
ContentLink
Lecture notesOverhead slides will be made available through Ilias.
LiteratureImboden, D.S. and S. Pfenninger (2013) Introduction to Systems Analysis: Mathematically Modeling Natural Systems. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

Link
752-4005-AALFood Microbiology I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Loessner
AbstractThis lecture is the first part of a one-year course. It offers insights into the fundamentals and applications of Food Microbiology. Contents include basic microbiology of the different bacteria, yeasts and molds present in foods, as well as the occurrence and control of foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms.
ObjectiveThe lecture offers insights into the fundamentals and applications of Food Microbiology. Contents include basic microbiology of the different bacteria, yeasts, molds and protozoa in foods, as well as the occurrence and control of foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms.
The focus of this first part of the two part lecture (Food Micro II is offered in the FS) will be on the organisms, but also on the factors which determine spoilage and foodborne disease.
Content1. History of Food Microbiology
1.1. Short synopsis of foodborne microorganisms
1.2. Spoilage of Foods
1.3. Foodborne Disease
1.4. Food Preservation
1.5. VIP's of Food Microbiology
2. Overview of Microorganisms in Foods
2.1 Origin of foodborne Microorganisms
2.2. Bacteria
2.3. Yeasts
2.4. Molds
3. Microbial Spoilage of Foods
3.1. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters
3.2. Meats, Seafoods, Eggs
3.3. Milk and Milk Products
3.4. Vegetable and Fruit Products
3.5. Miscellaneous (baked goods, nuts, spices, ready-to-eat products)
3.6. Drinks and Canned Foods
4. Foodborne Disease
4.1. Significance and Transmission of Foodborne pathogens
4.2. Staphylococcus aureus
4.3. Gram-positive Sporeformers (Bacillus & Clostridium)
4.4. Listeria monocytogenes
4.5. Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli
4.6. Vibrio, Yersinia, Campylobacter
4.7. Brucella, Mycobacterium
4.8. Parasites
4.9. Viruses and Bacteriophages
4.0. Mycotoxins
4.11. Bioactive Amines
4.12. Miscellaneous (Antibiotic-resistant Bacteria, Biofilms)
Lecture notesElectronic copies of the presentation slides (PDF) and additional material will be made available for download.
551-0003-AALGeneral Biology I+II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits13RU. Sauer, R. Aebersold, W. Gruissem, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractGeneral Biology I: Organismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.

General Biology II: Molecular biology approach to teach the basic principles of biochemistry, cell biology, cgenetics, evolutionary biology and form and function of vacular plants.
ObjectiveGeneral Biology I: The understanding of basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.

General Biology II: The understanding basic concepts of biology: the hierarchy of the structural levels of biological organisation, with particular emphasis on the cell and its molecular functions, the fundamentals of metabolism and molecular genetics, as well as form and function of vascular plants.
ContentGeneral Biology I:
General Biology I focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates


General Biology II: The structure and function of biomacromolecules; basics of metabolism; tour of the cell; membrane structure and function; basic energetics of cellular processes; respiration, photosynthesis; cell cycle, from gene to protein; structure and growth of vascular plants, resource acquisition and transport, soil and plant nutrition.

Specifically the following Campbell chapters will be covered:
3 Biochemistry Chemistry of water
4 Biochemistry Carbon: the basis of molecular diversity
5 Biochemistry Biological macromolecules and lipids
7 Cell biology Cell structure and function
8 Cell biology Cell membranes
10 Cell biology Respiration: introduction to metabolism
10 Cell biology Cell respiration
11 Cell biology Photosynthetic processes
16 Genetics Nucleic acids and inheritance
17 Genetics Expression of genes
18 Genetics Control of gene expression
19 Genetics DNA Technology
35 Plant structure&function Plant Structure and Growth
36 Plant structure&function Transport in vascular plants
37 Plant structure&function Plant nutrition
38 Plant structure&function Reproduction of flowering plants
39 Plant structure&function Plants signal and behavior
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2015) Biology - A Global Approach. 10th Edition (Global Edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic general and organic chemistry


This is a virtual self-study lecture for non-German speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology I (551-0001-00L) and "Allgemeine Biology II (551-0002-00L) lectures. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.
752-0100-AALBiochemistry
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RC. Frei
AbstractBasic knowledge of enzymology, in particular the structure, kinetics and chemistry of enzyme-catalysed reaction in vitro and in vivo. Biochemistry of metabolism: Those completing the course are able to describe and understand fundamental cellular metabolic processes.
ObjectiveBased on the biology and chemistry courses in the 1. and 2. semester more detailed biochemical knowledge about enzymology, membrane biochemistry, and central metabolism will be presented
ContentProgram

Introduction, basics, composition of cells, biochemical units, repetition of relevant organic chemistry
Structure and function of proteins
Carbohydrates, structure of DNA
Lipids an biological membranes
Enzymes and enzyme kinetics
Catalytic strategies
Metabolism: Basic concepts and design. Repetition of basic thermodynamics
Glycolysis
The citric acid cycle
Oxidative phosphorylation
Fatty acid metabolism
Lecture notesPrinciples of Biochemistry (5th Edition) 5th Edition
by Laurence A. Moran (Author), Robert A Horton (Author), Gray Scrimgeour (Author), Marc Perry (Author)
LiteraturePrinciples of Biochemistry (5th Edition) 5th Edition
by Laurence A. Moran (Author), Robert A Horton (Author), Gray Scrimgeour (Author), Marc Perry (Author)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in biology and chemistry is a precondition.
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