Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2018

Biologie Master Information
Wahlvertiefungen
Wahlvertiefung: Ökologie und Evolution
Obligatorische Konzeptkurse
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
701-2413-00LEvolutionary GeneticsO6 KP4VT. Städler, A. Widmer, P. C. Brunner, M. Fischer
KurzbeschreibungThe concept course 'Evolutionary Genetics' consists of two lectures that jointly provide an introduction to the fields of population and quantitative genetics (emphasis on basic concepts) and ecological genetics (more emphasis on evolutionary and ecological processes of adaptation and speciation).
LernzielThe aim of the course is to provide students with a solid introduction to the fields of population genetics, quantitative genetics, and ecological genetics. The concepts and research methods developed in these fields have undergone profound transformations; they are of fundamental importance in our understanding of evolutionary processes, both past and present. Students should gain an appreciation for the concepts, methods and explanatory power of evolutionary genetics.
InhaltPopulation genetics - Types and sources of genetic variation; randomly mating populations and the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; effects of inbreeding; natural selection; random genetic drift and effective population size; gene flow and hierarchical population structure; molecular population genetics: neutral theory of molecular evolution and basics of coalescent theory.
Quantitative genetics - Continuous variation; measurement of quant. characters; genes, environments and their interactions; measuring their influence; response to selection; inbreeding and crossbreeding, effects on fitness; Fisher's fundamental theorem.
Ecological Genetics - Concepts and methods for the study of genetic variation and its role in adaptation, reproductive isolation, hybridization and speciation
SkriptHandouts
LiteraturHamilton, M.B. 2009. Population Genetics. Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, U.K.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThere will be 5 optional extra sessions for the population genetics part (following lectures 2-6) for computer simulations, designed to help understand the course material.
701-0328-00LAdvanced Ecological Processes Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Nur für Studierende der folgenden Studienprogramme:
Biologie Master
Lehrdiplom Biologie
Umweltnaturwissenschaften Master
UZH MNF Biologie
UZH MNF Geographie /Erdwissenschaften
O4 KP2VJ. Levine
KurzbeschreibungThis course presents the theoretical and empirical approaches used to understand the ecological processes structuring communities. Central problems in community ecology including the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
LernzielStudents will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes, and how this predictive science informs conservation and management decisions.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.

Discuss the types of conceptual advances ecology as a science can realistically achieve, and how these relate to the applications of the discipline.
InhaltLectures supplemented with readings from the primary literature and occasional computer exercises will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, mutualism, invasion, the maintenance of species diversity, and species effects on ecosystem processes. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
701-0323-00LPlant Ecology
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
This lecture will not be offered in autumn semester 2018. It is transfered to spring semester and be offered for the next time in spring semester 2019.
O3 KP2VJ. Levine
KurzbeschreibungThis class focuses on ecological processes involved with plant life, mechanisms of plant adaptation, plant-animal and plant-soil interactions, plant strategies and implications for the structure and function of plant communities. The discussion of original research examples familiarises students with research questions and methods; they learn to evaluate results and interpretations.
LernzielStudents will be able to:
- propose methods to study ecological processes involved with plant life, and how these processes depend on internal and external factors;
- analyse benefits and costs of plant adaptations;
- explain plant strategies with relevant traits and trade-offs;
- explain and predict the assembly of plant communities;
- explain implications of plant strategies for animals, microbes and ecosystem functions;
- evaluate studies in plant ecology regarding research questions, assumptions, methods, as well as the reliability and relevance of results.
InhaltPlants represent the matrix of natural communities. The structure and dynamics of plant populations drives the function of ecosystems. This course presents essential processes and plant traits involved with plant life. We focus on research questions that have been of special interest to plant ecologists as well as current topical questions. We use original research examples to discuss how ecological questions are studied and how results are interpreted.
- Growth: what determines the production of a plant?
- Nutrients: consumption or recycling: opposite strategies and feedbacks on soils;
- Clonality: collaboration and division of labour in plants;
- Plasticity: benefits and costs of plant intelligence;
- Flowering and pollination: how expensive is sex?
- Seed types, dispersal, seed banks and germination: strategies and trade-offs in the persistence of plant populations;
- Development and structure of plant populations;
- Stress, disturbance and competition as drivers of different plant strategies;
- Herbivory: plant-animal feedbacks and functioning of grazing ecosystems
- Fire: impacts on plants, vegetation and ecosystems.
- Plant functional types and rules in the assembly of plant communities.
SkriptHandouts and further reading will be available electronically at the beginning of the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites
- General knowledge of plant biology
- Basic knowledge of plant sytematics
- General ecological concepts
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