Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Biology Master Information
Elective Major Subject Areas
Elective Major: Biological Chemistry
Elective Concept Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0320-00LCellular Biochemistry (Part II)W3 credits2VY. Barral, R. Kroschewski, A. E. Smith
AbstractThis course will focus on molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying cellular biochemistry, providing advanced insights into the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the complex regulation of their interactions. Particular emphasis will be on the spatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes.
ObjectiveThe full-year course (551-0319-00 & 551-0320-00) focuses on the molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying the biochemistry of cellular physiology, investigating how these processes are integrated to carry out highly coordinated cellular functions. The molecular characterization of complex cellular functions requires a combination of approaches such as biochemistry, but also cell biology and genetics. This course is therefore the occasion to discuss these techniques and their integration in modern cellular biochemistry.
The students will be able to describe the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the spatial and temporal regulation of their interactions. In particular, they will learn to explain how different molecules and signaling pathways can be integrated during complex and highly dynamic cellular processes such as intracellular transport, cytoskeletal rearrangements, cell motility, and cell division. In addition, they will be able to illustrate the relevance of particular signaling pathways for cellular pathologies such as cancer or during cellular infection.
ContentSpatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes, such as cell division, cell infection and cell motility. Emphasis is also put on the understanding of pathologies associated with defective cell physiology, such as cancer or during cellular infection.
LiteratureRecommended supplementary literature (review articles and selected primary literature) will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo attend this course the students must have a solid basic knowledge in chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology and general biology. Biology students have in general already attended the first part of the "Cellular Biochemistry" concept course (551-0319-00). The course will be taught in English.
In addition, the course will be based on a blended-learning scenario, where frontal lectures will be complemented with carefully chosen web-based teaching elements that students access through the ETH Moodle platform.
551-0307-01LMolecular and Structural Biology II: From Gene to Protein
D-BIOL students are obliged to take part I and part II as a two-semester course.
W3 credits2VN. Ban, F. Allain, M. Pilhofer
AbstractThis course will cover advanced topics in molecular biology and biochemistry with emphasis on the structure and function of cellular assemblies involved in expression and maintenance of genetic information. We will cover the architecture and the function of molecules involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, nucleic acid packaging in viruses, RNA processing, and CRISPER/CAS system.
ObjectiveStudents will gain a deep understanding of large cellular assemblies and the structure-function relationships governing their function in fundamental cellular processes ranging from DNA replication, transcription and translation. The lectures throughout the course will be complemented by exercises and discussions of original research examples to provide students with a deeper understanding of the subjects and to encourage active student participation.
ContentAdvanced class covering the state of the research in structural molecular biology of basic cellular processes with emphasis on the function of large cellular assemblies.
Lecture notesUpdated handouts will be provided during the class.
LiteratureThe lecture will be based on the latest literature. Additional suggested
literature:
Branden, C., and J. Tooze, Introduction to Protein Structure, 2nd ed.
(1995). Garland, New York.
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