Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Computational Science and Engineering Master Information
Fields of Specialization
Robotics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0854-00LAutonomous Mobile Robots Information W5 credits4GR. Siegwart, M. Chli, J. Nieto
AbstractThe objective of this course is to provide the basics required to develop autonomous mobile robots and systems. Main emphasis is put on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, envionmen perception, and probabilistic environment modeling, localizatoin, mapping and navigation. Theory will be deepened by exercises with small mobile robots and discussed accross application examples.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to provide the basics required to develop autonomous mobile robots and systems. Main emphasis is put on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, envionmen perception, and probabilistic environment modeling, localizatoin, mapping and navigation.
Lecture notesThis lecture is enhanced by around 30 small videos introducing the core topics, and multiple-choice questions for continuous self-evaluation. It is developed along the TORQUE (Tiny, Open-with-Restrictions courses focused on QUality and Effectiveness) concept, which is ETH's response to the popular MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) concept.
LiteratureThis lecture is based on the Textbook:
Introduction to Autonomous Mobile Robots
Roland Siegwart, Illah Nourbakhsh, Davide Scaramuzza, The MIT Press, Second Edition 2011, ISBN: 978-0262015356
151-0566-00LRecursive Estimation Information W4 credits2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
AbstractEstimation of the state of a dynamic system based on a model and observations in a computationally efficient way.
ObjectiveLearn the basic recursive estimation methods and their underlying principles.
ContentIntroduction to state estimation; probability review; Bayes' theorem; Bayesian tracking; extracting estimates from probability distributions; Kalman filter; extended Kalman filter; particle filter; observer-based control and the separation principle.
Lecture notesLecture notes available on course website: Link
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: Introductory probability theory and matrix-vector algebra.
252-0220-00LIntroduction to Machine Learning Information
Previously called Learning and Intelligent Systems

Prof. Krause approves that students take distance exams, also if the exam will take place at a later time due to a different time zone of the alternative exam place.
To get Prof. Krause's signature on the distance exam form please send it to Rita Klute, Link.
W8 credits4V + 2U + 1AA. Krause
AbstractThe course introduces the foundations of learning and making predictions based on data.
ObjectiveThe course will introduce the foundations of learning and making predictions from data. We will study basic concepts such as trading goodness of fit and model complexitiy. We will discuss important machine learning algorithms used in practice, and provide hands-on experience in a course project.
Content- Linear regression (overfitting, cross-validation/bootstrap, model selection, regularization, [stochastic] gradient descent)
- Linear classification: Logistic regression (feature selection, sparsity, multi-class)
- Kernels and the kernel trick (Properties of kernels; applications to linear and logistic regression; k-NN
- The statistical perspective (regularization as prior; loss as likelihood; learning as MAP inference)
- Statistical decision theory (decision making based on statistical models and utility functions)
- Discriminative vs. generative modeling (benefits and challenges in modeling joint vy. conditional distributions)
- Bayes' classifiers (Naive Bayes, Gaussian Bayes; MLE)
- Bayesian networks and exact inference (conditional independence; variable elimination; TANs)
- Approximate inference (sum/max product; Gibbs sampling)
- Latent variable models (Gaussian Misture Models, EM Algorithm)
- Temporal models (Bayesian filtering, Hidden Markov Models)
- Sequential decision making (MDPs, value and policy iteration)
- Reinforcement learning (model-based RL, Q-learning)
LiteratureTextbook: Kevin Murphy: A Probabilistic Perspective, MIT Press
Prerequisites / NoticeDesigned to provide basis for following courses:
- Advanced Machine Learning
- Data Mining: Learning from Large Data Sets
- Probabilistic Artificial Intelligence
- Probabilistic Graphical Models
- Seminar "Advanced Topics in Machine Learning"
252-0579-00L3D Vision Information W4 credits3GT. Sattler, M. R. Oswald
AbstractThe course covers camera models and calibration, feature tracking and matching, camera motion estimation via simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and visual odometry (VO), epipolar and mult-view geometry, structure-from-motion, (multi-view) stereo, augmented reality, and image-based (re-)localization.
ObjectiveAfter attending this course, students will:
1. understand the core concepts for recovering 3D shape of objects and scenes from images and video.
2. be able to implement basic systems for vision-based robotics and simple virtual/augmented reality applications.
3. have a good overview over the current state-of-the art in 3D vision.
4. be able to critically analyze and asses current research in this area.
ContentThe goal of this course is to teach the core techniques required for robotic and augmented reality applications: How to determine the motion of a camera and how to estimate the absolute position and orientation of a camera in the real world. This course will introduce the basic concepts of 3D Vision in the form of short lectures, followed by student presentations discussing the current state-of-the-art. The main focus of this course are student projects on 3D Vision topics, with an emphasis on robotic vision and virtual and augmented reality applications.
401-5860-00LSeminar in Robotics for CSEW4 credits2SR. Siegwart
AbstractThis course provides an opportunity to familiarize yourself with the advanced topics of robotics and mechatronics research. The seminar consists of a literature study, including a report and a presentation.
ObjectiveThe students are familiar with the challenges of the fascinating and interdisciplinary field of Robotics and Mechatronics. They are introduced in the basics of independent non-experimental scientific research and are able to summarize and to present the results efficiently.
ContentThis 4 ECTS course requires each student to discuss a study plan with the lecturer and select minimum 10 relevant scientific publications to read through. At the end of semester, the results should be presented in an oral presentation and summarized in a report.
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