Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Process Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0116-10LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for Engineers II Information W4 credits4GP. Koumoutsakos, P. Chatzidoukas
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
ObjectiveThe course will teach
- programming models and tools for multi and many-core architectures
- fundamental concepts of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences
ContentHigh Performance Computing:
- Advanced topics in shared-memory programming
- Advanced topics in MPI
- GPU architectures and CUDA programming

Uncertainty Quantification:
- Uncertainty quantification under parametric and non-parametric modeling uncertainty
- Bayesian inference with model class assessment
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation
Lecture notesLink
Class notes, handouts
Literature- Class notes
- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein
- CUDA by example, J. Sanders and E. Kandrot
- Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial, Devinderjit Sivia
151-0206-00LEnergy Systems and Power EngineeringW4 credits2V + 2UR. S. Abhari, A. Steinfeld
AbstractIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
ObjectiveIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
ContentWorld primary energy resources and use: fossil fuels, renewable energies, nuclear energy; present situation, trends, and future developments. Sustainable energy system and environmental impact of energy conversion and use: energy, economy and society. Electric power and the electricity economy worldwide and in Switzerland; production, consumption, alternatives. The electric power distribution system. Renewable energy and power: available techniques and their potential. Cost of electricity. Conventional power plants and their cycles; state-of-the -art and advanced cycles. Combined cycles and cogeneration; environmental benefits. Solar thermal power generation and solar photovoltaics. Hydrogen as energy carrier. Fuel cells: characteristics, fuel reforming and combined cycles. Nuclear power plant technology.
Lecture notesVorlesungsunterlagen werden verteilt
151-0208-00LComputational Methods for Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer ProblemsW4 credits2V + 2UD. W. Meyer-Massetti
AbstractNumerical methods for the solution of flow, heat and mass transfer problems are presented and practised by analytical and computer solutions for simple examples.
Subjects: solution process, physical and mathematical models, basic equations, discretization methods, numerical solution of advection, diffusion and Poisson equations, turbulent flows.
ObjectiveKnowledge of and practical experience with important discretisation and solution methods for computational fluid dynamics and heat and mass transfer problems
ContentAufbauend auf den Lehrveranstaltungen über Fluiddynamik, Thermodynamik, Computational Methods for Engineering Application I (empfehlenswertes Wahlfach, 4. Semester) und Informatik (Programmieren) werden numerische Methoden für Berechnungsaufgaben der Fluiddynamik, Energie- und Verfahrenstechnik dargestellt und an einfachen Beispielen geübt.

1. Einleitung
Übersicht, Anwendungen
Problemlösungsprozess, Fehler
2. Rekapitulation der Grundgleichungen
Formulierung, Anfangs- und Randbedingungen
3. Numerische Diskretisierungsverfahren
Finite-Differenzen- und Finite-Volumen-Verfahren
Grundbegriffe: Konsistenz, Stabilität, Konvergenz
4. Lösung der grundlegenden Gleichungstypen
Wärmeleitungs/Diffusionsgleichung (parabolisch)
Poisson-Gleichung (elliptisch)
Advektionsgleichung/Wellengleichung (hyperbolisch)
und Advektions-Diffusions-Gleichung
5. Berechnung inkompressibler Strömungen
6. Berechnung turbulenter Strömungen
Lecture notesLecture notes are available (in German)
Literaturea list of references is supplied
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is crucial to actively solve the analytical and practical (programming) exercises.
151-0211-00LConvective Heat Transport
Does not take place this semester.
W5 credits4GH. G. Park
AbstractThis course will teach the field of heat transfer by convection. This heat transport process is intimately tied to fluid dynamics and mathematics, meaning that solid background in these disciplines are necessary. Convection has direct implications in various industries, e.g. microfabrication, microfluidics, microelectronics cooling, thermal shields protection for space shuttles.
ObjectiveAdvanced introduction to the field of heat transfer by convection.
ContentThe course covers the following topics:
1. Introduction: Fundamentals and Conservation Equations 2. Laminar Fully Developed Velocity and Temperature Fields 3. Laminar Thermally Developing Flows 4. Laminar Hydrodynamic Boundary Layers 5. Laminar Thermal Boundary Layers 6. Laminar Thermal Boundary Layers with Viscous Dissipation 7. Turbulent Flows 8. Natural Convection.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be delivered in class via note-taking. Textbook serves as a great source of the lecture notes.
LiteratureText:
(Main) Kays and Crawford, Convective Heat and Mass Transfer, McGraw-Hill, Inc.
(Secondary) A. Bejan, Convection Heat Transfer
References:
Incropera and De Witt, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, or Introduction to Heat Transfer Kundu and Cohen, Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press V. Arpaci, Convection Heat Transfer
151-0224-00LSynthesis Fuel Engineering
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits3V
AbstractThis course will cover current and prospective chemical fuel technologies. It addresses both fossil and renewable resources technologies.
ObjectiveDevelop a basic understanding of the many convential and renewable fuel synthesis and processing technollogies.
ContentFuels overview including fuel utilization and economics. Conventional fuel module will cover fuel synthesis, refining and upgrading technologies. Renewable fuel module will cover fule synthesis via photo-, electro-, and thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting and biomass conversion technologies.
Lecture notesWill be available electronically.
LiteratureA) Synthetic Fuels Handbook: Properties, Process and Performace, J.G. Speight, Ed McGraw Hill, 2008; B) Synthetic Fuels, R.F. Probstein and R.E. Hicks, Ed. Dover Publications, 2006; C) Fischer-Tropsch Refining, Arno de Klerk, Ed. Wiley-VCH, 2011; D) Modeling and Simulation of Catalytic Reactors for Petroleum Refining, J. Ancheyta, Ed. Wiley, 2011.
Prerequisites / NoticeA fundamental understanding of chemistry and engineering is strongly recommended.
151-0280-00LAdvanced Techniques for the Risk Analysis of Technical Systems Information W4 credits2V + 1UG. Sansavini
AbstractThe course provides advanced tools for the risk/vulnerability analysis and engineering of complex technical systems and critical infrastructures. It covers application of modeling techniques and design management concepts for strengthening the performance and robustness of such systems, with reference to energy, communication and transportation systems.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to model complex technical systems and critical infrastructures including their dependencies and interdependencies. They will learn how to select and apply appropriate numerical techniques to quantify the technical risk and vulnerability in different contexts (Monte Carlo simulation, Markov chains, complex network theory). Students will be able to evaluate which method for quantification and propagation of the uncertainty of the vulnerability is more appropriate for various complex technical systems. At the end of the course, they will be able to propose design improvements and protection/mitigation strategies to reduce risks and vulnerabilities of these systems.
ContentModern technical systems and critical infrastructures are complex, highly integrated and interdependent. Examples of these are highly integrated energy supply, energy supply with high penetrations of renewable energy sources, communication, transport, and other physically networked critical infrastructures that provide vital social services. As a result, standard risk-assessment tools are insufficient in evaluating the levels of vulnerability, reliability, and risk.
This course offers suitable analytical models and computational methods to tackle this issue with scientific accuracy. Students will develop competencies which are typically requested for the formation of experts in reliability design, safety and protection of complex technical systems and critical infrastructures.
Specific topics include:
- Introduction to complex technical systems and critical infrastructures
- Basics of the Markov approach to system modeling for reliability and availability analysis
- Monte Carlo simulation for reliability and availability analysis
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo for applications to reliability and availability analysis
- Dependent, common cause and cascading failures
- Complex network theory for the vulnerability analysis of complex technical systems and critical infrastructures
- Basic concepts of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in support to the analysis of the reliability and risk of complex systems under incomplete knowledge of their behavior
Practical exercitations and computational problems will be carried out and solved both during classroom tutorials and as homework.
Lecture notesSlides and other materials will be available online
LiteratureThe class will be largely based on the books:
- "Computational Methods For Reliability And Risk Analysis" by E. Zio, World Scientific Publishing Company
- "Vulnerable Systems" by W. Kröger and E. Zio, Springer
- additional recommendations for text books will be covered in the class
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability
151-0902-00LMicro- and Nanoparticle TechnologyW6 credits2V + 2US. E. Pratsinis, K. Wegner, M. Eggersdorfer
AbstractIntroduction to fundamentals of micro- and nanoparticle synthesis and processing. Characterization of suspensions, sampling and measuring techniques; basics of gas-solid and liquid-solid systems; fragmentation, coagulation, growth, separation, fluidization, filtration, mixing, transport, coatings. Particle processing in manufacture of catalysts, sensors, nanocomposites and chemical commodities.
ObjectiveIntroduction to design methods of mechanical processes, scale-up laws and optimal use of materials and energy
ContentCharacterisation of particle suspensions and corresponding measuring techniques; basic laws of gas / solids resp. Liquid / solids systems; unit operations of mechanical processing:
desintegration, agglomeration, screening, air classifying, sedimentation, filtration, particle separation from gas streams, mixing, pneumatic conveying. Synthesis of unit operations to process systems in chemical industry, cement industry etc.
Lecture notesMechanical Process Engineering I
151-0910-00LPractica in Particle TechnologyW1 credit1PS. E. Pratsinis
AbstractPractical training stressing the fundamentals in processing and highlighting experiments focusing on particle engineering science and applications. Students attend and give written reports on these experiments and answer questions on them. Familiarize the students with particle equipment and processes.
ObjectiveThe goal of the class is to provide hands-on experiences in particle science and engineering. Emphasis is placed on laboratory safety, systematic experimentation, deep understanding of the underlying concepts, validation and comparison with existing data from the literature.
ContentThe class is made by 3-4 experiments (filtration, sieving, droplet evaporation in fluid flow, CFD design or flame reactor) that are selected depending on equipment availability. Students have to prepare and execute such experiments and complete a detailed written report on which they would be examined on safe running of laboratories and for critical evaluation of their data along with the corresponding literature as it becomes available.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite Courses: Micro- and Nanoparticle Technology (151-0902-00), Mass Transfer (151-0917-00) and Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering (151-0619-00) or permission by the instructor.
151-0926-00LSeparation Process Technology IW4 credits3GM. Mazzotti
AbstractNon-empirical design of gas-liquid, vapor-liquid, and liquid-liquid separation processes for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium.
ObjectiveNon-empirical design of gas-liquid, vapor-liquid, and liquid-liquid separation processes for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium.
ContentMethods for the non empirical design of equilibrium stage separations for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium. Topics: introduction to the separation process technology. Phase equilibrium: vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid. Flash vaporization: binary and multicomponent. Equilibrium stages and multistage cascades. Gas absorption and stripping. Continuous distillation: design methods for binary and multicomponent systems; continuous-contact equipment; azeotropic distillation, equipment for gas-liquid operations. Liquid/liquid extraction. The lecture is supported by a web base learning tool, i.e. HyperTVT.
Lecture notesLecture notes available
LiteratureTreybal "Mass-transfer operations" oder Seader/Henley "Separation process principles" oder Wankat "Equilibrium stage separations" oder Weiss/Militzer/Gramlich "Thermische Verfahrenstechnik"
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Stoffaustausch

A self-learning web-based environment is available (HyperTVT):
Link
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based ResourcesW4 credits3GM. Mazzotti, L. Bretschger, R. Knutti, C. Müller, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
AbstractCarbon-based resources (coal, oil, gas): origin, production, processing, resource economics. Climate change: science, policies. CCS systems: CO2 capture in power/industrial plants, CO2 transport and storage. Besides technical details, economical, legal and societal aspects are considered (e.g. electricity markets, barriers to deployment).
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to introduce carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far and the current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing and economics of carbon-based resources, and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with important technical and non-technical issues related to use of carbon resources, climate change, and CCS as a transitional mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion. At the end of the semester a group project is planned.
ContentBoth the Swiss and the European energy system face a number of significant challenges over the coming decades. The major concerns are the security and economy of energy supply and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels will continue to satisfy the largest part of the energy demand in the medium term for Europe, and they could become part of the Swiss energy portfolio due to the planned phase out of nuclear power. Carbon capture and storage is considered an important option for the decarbonization of the power sector and it is the only way to reduce emissions in CO2 intensive industrial plants (e.g. cement- and steel production).
Building on the previously offered class "Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS)", we have added two specific topics: 1) the industry of carbon-based resources, i.e. what is upstream of the CCS value chain, and 2) the science of climate change, i.e. why and how CO2 emissions are a problem.
The course is devided into four parts:
I) The first part will be dedicated to the origin, production, and processing of conventional as well as of unconventional carbon-based resources.
II) The second part will comprise two lectures from experts in the field of climate change sciences and resource economics.
III) The third part will explain the technical details of CO2 capture (current and future options) as well as of CO2 storage and utilization options, taking again also economical, legal, and sociatel aspects into consideration.
IV) The fourth part will comprise two lectures from industry experts, one with focus on electricity markets, the other on the experiences made with CCS technologies in the industry.
Throughout the class, time will be allocated to work on a number of tasks related to the theory, individually, in groups, or in plenum. Moreover, the students will apply the theoretical knowledge acquired during the course in a case study covering all the topics.
Lecture notesPower Point slides and distributed handouts
LiteratureIPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014. Link

IPCC Special Report on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, 2005. Link

The Global Status of CCS: 2014. Published by the Global CCS Institute, Nov 2014.
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
151-0931-00LSeminar on Particle TechnologyZ0 credits3SS. E. Pratsinis
AbstractThe latest advances in particle technology are highlighted focusing on aerosol fundamentals in connection to materials processing and nanoscale engineering. Students attend and give research presentations for the research they plan to do and at the end of the semester they defend their results and answer questions from research scientists. Familiarize the students with the latest in this field.
ObjectiveThe goal of the seminar is to introduce and discuss newest developments in particle science and engineering. Emphasis is placed on the oral presentation of research results, validation and comparison with existing
data from the literature. Students learn how to organize and deliver effectively a scientific presentation and how to articulate and debate scientific results.
ContentThe seminar addresses synthesis, characterization, handling and modeling of particulate systems (aerosols, suspensions etc.) for applications in ceramics, catalysis, reinforcements, pigments, composites etc. on the examples of newest research developments. It comprises particle - particle interactions, particle - fluid interactions and the response of the particulate system to the specific application.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Particle Technology (30-902) or Particulate Processes (151-0903-00)
151-0940-00LModelling and Mathematical Methods in Process and Chemical EngineeringW4 credits3GM. Mazzotti
AbstractStudy of the non-numerical solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and first order partial differential equations, with application to chemical kinetics, simple batch distillation, and chromatography.
ObjectiveStudy of the non-numerical solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and first order partial differential equations, with application to chemical kinetics, simple batch distillation, and chromatography.
ContentDevelopment of mathematical models in process and chemical engineering, particularly for chemical kinetics, batch distillation, and chromatography. Study of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), their stability, and their qualitative analysis. Study of single first order partial differential equation (PDE) in space and time, using the method of characteristics. Application of the theory of ODEs to population dynamics, chemical kinetics (Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction), and simple batch distillation (residue curve maps). Application of the method of characteristic to chromatography.
Lecture notesno skript
LiteratureA. Varma, M. Morbidelli, "Mathematical methods in chemical engineering," Oxford University Press (1997)
H.K. Rhee, R. Aris, N.R. Amundson, "First-order partial differential equations. Vol. 1," Dover Publications, New York (1986)
R. Aris, "Mathematical modeling: A chemical engineer’s perspective," Academic Press, San Diego (1999)
151-0946-00LMacromolecular Engineering: Networks and GelsW4 credits4GM. Tibbitt
AbstractThis course will provide an introduction to the design and physics of soft matter with a focus on polymer networks and hydrogels. The course will integrate fundamental aspects of polymer physics, engineering of soft materials, mechanics of viscoelastic materials, applications of networks and gels in biomedical applications including tissue engineering, 3D printing, and drug delivery.
ObjectiveThe main learning objectives of this course are: 1. Identify the key characteristics of soft matter and the properties of ideal and non-ideal macromolecules. 2. Calculate the physical properties of polymers in solution. 3. Predict macroscale properties of polymer networks and gels based on constituent chemical structure and topology. 4. Design networks and gels for industrial and biomedical applications. 5. Read and evaluate research papers on recent research on networks and gels and communicate the content orally to a multidisciplinary audience.
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts.
LiteraturePolymer Physics by M. Rubinstein and R.H. Colby; samplings from other texts.
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I+II, Thermodynamics I+II
151-0958-00LPractica in Process Engineering IIW2 credits2PS. E. Pratsinis, M. Mazzotti
AbstractPractical training at pilot facilities for fundamental processing steps, typical laboratory and pilot facility experiments.
ObjectivePractical training at pilot facilities for fundamental processing steps, typical laboratory and pilot facility experiments.
151-1906-00LMultiphase FlowW4 credits3GH.‑M. Prasser
AbstractBasics in multiphase flow systems,, mainly gas-liquid, is presented in this course. An introduction summarizes the characteristics of multi phase flows, some theoretical models are discussed. Following we focus on pipe flow, film and bubbly/droplet flow. Finally specific measuring methods are shown and a summary of the CFD models for multiphases is presented.
ObjectiveThis course contributes to a deep understanding of complex multiphase systems and allows to predict multiphase conditions to design appropriate systems/apparatus. Actual examples and new developments are presented.
ContentThe course gives an overview on following subjects: Basics in multiphase systems, pipeflow, films, bubbles and bubble columns, droplets, measuring techniques, multiphase flow in microsystems, numerical procedures with multiphase flows.
Lecture notesLecturing notes are available (copy of slides or a german script) partly in english
LiteratureSpecial literature is recommended for each chapter.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course builds on the basics in fluidmechanics.
151-2016-00LRadiation-Based Imaging Methods for Nuclear and Industrial ApplicationsW4 credits2V + 1UH.‑M. Prasser, R. Adams
AbstractThe course offers an overview of the engineering principles of radiation-based imaging methods as X-ray/gamma and neutron imaging. Special attention is given to the application of such methods to nuclear engineering, industrial and civil safety problems. The Lecture is complemented with numerical and hands on laboratory exercises.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the principles and applicability of radiation-based imaging methods as radiography and tomography, their mathematical principles and the necessary data and signal processing methods. The lecture gives an overview of the associated radiation source and imaging detector technologies.
ContentPrinciples of computed tomographic imaging (inverse problems, Radon transformation, central slice theorem); parallel, fan-, and cone-beam and limited angle tomography; image filtering and conditioning methods; back projection algorithms (FBP, ART, direct FFT, FDK); resolution and contrast; scatter and beam hardening artefacts; image rendering and segmentation; Radiation source technology: X-ray tubes/LINACs, synchrotrons, gamma sources, neutron sources (reactor, spallation, accelerator based, neutron generators); detector technology: interaction mechanisms for photons and neutrons, detector materials, resolution and efficiency; applicability and complementarity of photon vs. neutron based imaging techniques; thermal and fast neutron imaging; combined imaging modalities; Applications in nuclear technology: fuel bundle research (thermal-hydraulics, cladding hydration, spent fuel characterization etc.); non-nuclear industrial applications: multi-phase flows in oil and chemical industry, fuel cell research, cultural heritage investigations, PEPT etc.; applications in nuclear safe guards; applications for citizen and homeland security; More exotic approaches: energy selective imaging; TOF, ultra-fast X-ray tomography using deflected electron beams; the course is complemented with numerical exercises and hands on laboratory demonstrations (neutron imaging demo at ICON/PSI, X-ray/gamma imaging at ETH/PSI).
Lecture notesLecture slides, additional readings and exercise materials will be provided.
Literature- Kak & Slaney: Principles of Computerized Tomographic Imaging (Link)
- Knoll: Radiation Detection and Measurement
- Smith: The Scientist and Engineers Guide to Digital Signal Processing (Link)
- Natterer: The Mathematics of Computerized Tomography, Wiley, 1986
- Neutron imaging flyer, PSI (Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic nuclear physics, recommended courses: 151-0163-00L Nuclear Energy Conversion, 151-2035-00L Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, 151-0123-00L Experimental Methods for Engineers, MATLAB skills for exercises.
227-0966-00LQuantitative Big Imaging: From Images to StatisticsW4 credits2V + 1UK. S. Mader, M. Stampanoni
AbstractThe lecture focuses on the challenging task of extracting robust, quantitative metrics from imaging data and is intended to bridge the gap between pure signal processing and the experimental science of imaging. The course will focus on techniques, scalability, and science-driven analysis.
Objective1. Introduction of applied image processing for research science covering basic image processing, quantitative methods, and statistics.
2. Understanding of imaging as a means to accomplish a scientific goal.
3. Ability to apply quantitative methods to complex 3D data to determine the validity of a hypothesis
ContentImaging is a well established field and is rapidly growing as technological improvements push the limits of resolution in space, time, material and functional sensitivity. These improvements have meant bigger, more diverse datasets being acquired at an ever increasing rate. With methods varying from focused ion beams to X-rays to magnetic resonance, the sources for these images are exceptionally heterogeneous; however, the tools and techniques for processing these images and transforming them into quantitative, biologically or materially meaningful information are similar.
The course consists of equal parts theory and practical analysis of first synthetic and then real imaging datasets. Basic aspects of image processing are covered such as filtering, thresholding, and morphology. From these concepts a series of tools will be developed for analyzing arbitrary images in a very generic manner. Specifically a series of methods will be covered, e.g. characterizing shape, thickness, tortuosity, alignment, and spatial distribution of material features like pores. From these metrics the statistics aspect of the course will be developed where reproducibility, robustness, and sensitivity will be investigated in order to accurately determine the precision and accuracy of these quantitative measurements. A major emphasis of the course will be scalability and the tools of the 'Big Data' trend will be discussed and how cluster, cloud, and new high-performance large dataset techniques can be applied to analyze imaging datasets. In addition, given the importance of multi-scale systems, a data-management and analysis approach based on modern databases will be presented for storing complex hierarchical information in a flexible manner. Finally as a concluding project the students will apply the learned methods on real experimental data from the latest 3D experiments taken from either their own work / research or partnered with an experimental imaging group.
The course provides the necessary background to perform the quantitative evaluation of complicated 3D imaging data in a minimally subjective or arbitrary manner to answer questions coming from the fields of physics, biology, medicine, material science, and paleontology.
Lecture notesAvailable online.
LiteratureWill be indicated during the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally students will have some familiarity with basic manipulation and programming in languages like Matlab and R. Interested students who are worried about their skill level in this regard are encouraged to contact Kevin Mader directly (Link).

More advanced students who are familiar with Java, C++, and Python will have to opportunity to develop more of their own tools.
529-0191-01LRenewable Energy Technologies II, Energy Storage and Conversion
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GT. Schmidt, L. Gubler
AbstractGlobal & Swiss energy system. Storage: Pumped water, flywheels, compressed air. Hydrogen as energy carrier; electrolysis; power-to-gas. Fuel cells: from fundamentals to systems; Fuel cell vehicles; electrochemical storage in batteries. supercapacitors and redox flow cells; electromobility. The main focus of the lecture will be on electrochemical energy conversion and storage.
ObjectiveStudents will recognize the importance of energy storage in an industrial energy system, specifically in the context of a future system based on renewable sources. The efficient generation of electricity from hydrogen in fuel cells, and the efficient energy storage in batteries and supercapacitors will be introduced. Students will get a detailed insight into electrochemical energy conversion and storage, which will play an important role in future energy systems.
Literature- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005).
- C.H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich; Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH (2007).
- K. Krischer, K. Schönleber: Physiccs of Energy Conversion, De Gruyter (2015)
- R. Schlögl, Chemical Energy Storage, De Gruyter (2013)
Prerequisites / NoticePlease note that this is a 3 hours/week lecture including exercises, i.e., exercises will be included and are not separated. It is therefore highly recommended to attend the full 3 hours every week.

Participating students are required to have basic knowlegde of chemistry and thermodynamics.
529-0633-00LHeterogeneous Reaction EngineeringW4 credits3GJ. Pérez-Ramírez, C. Mondelli
AbstractHeterogeneous Reaction Engineering equips students with tools essential for the optimal development of heterogeneous processes. Integrating concepts from chemical engineering and chemistry, students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of heterogeneous reactions and will develop the necessary skills for the selection and design of various types of idealized reactors.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students will understand the basic principles of catalyzed and uncatalyzed heterogeneous reactions. They will know models to represent fluid-fluid and fluid-solid reactions; how to describe the kinetics of surface reactions; how to evaluate mass and heat transfer phenomena and account for their impact on catalyst effectiveness; the principle causes of catalyst deactivation; and reactor systems and protocols for catalyst testing.
ContentThe following components are covered:
- Fluid-fluid and fluid-solid heterogeneous reactions.
- Kinetics of surface reactions.
- Mass and heat transport phenomena.
- Catalyst effectiveness.
- Catalyst deactivation.
- Strategies for catalyst testing.

These aspects are exemplified through modern examples.
For each core topic exercises are assigned and evaluated.
The course also features an industrial lecture.
Lecture notesA dedicated script and lecture slides are available in printed form during the course.
LiteratureH. Scott Fogler: Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1992

O. Levenspiel: Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, 1999

Further relevant sources are given during the course.
636-0111-00LSynthetic Biology I
Attention: This course was offered in previous semesters with the number: 636-0002-00L "Synthetic Biology I". Students that already passed course 636-0002-00L cannot receive credits for course 636-0111-00L.
W4 credits3GS. Panke, J. Stelling
AbstractTheoretical & practical introduction into the design of dynamic biological systems at different levels of abstraction, ranging from biological fundamentals of systems design (introduction to bacterial gene regulation, elements of transcriptional & translational control, advanced genetic engineering) to engineering design principles (standards, abstractions) mathematical modelling & systems desig
ObjectiveAfter the course, students will be able to theoretically master the biological and engineering fundamentals required for biological design to be able to participate in the international iGEM competition (see Link).
ContentThe overall goal of the course is to familiarize the students with the potential, the requirements and the problems of designing dynamic biological elements that are of central importance for manipulating biological systems, primarily (but not exclusively) prokaryotic systems. Next, the students will be taken through a number of successful examples of biological design, such as toggle switches, pulse generators, and oscillating systems, and apply the biological and engineering fundamentals to these examples, so that they get hands-on experience on how to integrate the various disciplines on their way to designing biological systems.
Lecture notesHandouts during classes.
LiteratureMark Ptashne, A Genetic Switch (3rd ed), Cold Spring Haror Laboratory Press
Uri Alon, An Introduction to Systems Biology, Chapman & Hall
Prerequisites / Notice1) Though we do not place a formal requirement for previous participation in particular courses, we expect all participants to be familiar with a certain level of biology and of mathematics. Specifically, there will be material for self study available on Link as of mid January, and everybody is expected to be fully familiar with this material BEFORE THE CLASS BEGINS to be able to follow the different lectures. Please contact Link for access to material
2) The course is also thought as a preparation for the participation in the international iGEM synthetic biology summer competition (Link, Link). This competition is also the contents of the course Synthetic Biology II. Link
  •  Page  1  of  1