Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Nuclear Engineering Master Information
MSc Nuclear Engineering is a joint program of EPF Lausanne and ETH Zurich. The first semester takes place in Lausanne. Students therefore have to enroll at EPFL.
For more information about the curriculum and courses see: Link
Core Courses
1. Semester (EPFL)
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-2011-00LNeutronics (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
O4 credits3Gexternal organisers
AbstractIn this course, one acquires an understanding of the basic neutronics interactions occurring in a nuclear fission reactor and, as such, the conditions for establishing and controlling a nuclear chain reaction.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:
- Elaborate on neutron diffusion equation
- Systematize nuclear reaction cross sections
- Formulate approximations to solving the diffusion equation for simple systems
ContentContent:
- Brief review of nuclear physics
- Historical: Constitution of the nucleus and discovery of the neutron -
Nuclear reactions and radioactivity - Cross sections - Differences between
fusion and fission.
- Nuclear fission
- Characteristics - Nuclear fuel - Introductory elements of neutronics.
- Fissile and fertile materials - Breeding.
- Neutron diffusion and slowing down
- Monoenergetic neutrons - Angular and scalar flux
- Diffusion theory as simplified case of transport theory - Neutron slowing
down through elastic scattering.
- Multiplying media (reactors)
- Multiplication factors - Criticality condition in simple cases.
- Thermal reactors - Neutron spectra - Multizone reactors - Multigroup
theory and general criticality condition - Heterogeneous reactors.
- Reactor kinetics
- Point reactor model: prompt and delayed transients - Practical
applications.
- Reactivity variations and control
- Short, medium and long term reactivity changes ? Different means of
control.
LiteratureDistributed documents, recommended book chapters
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite for: Reactor Experiments
151-2013-00LRadiation and Reactor Experiments (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
O4 credits5Uexternal organisers
AbstractTo gain hands-on experience in the conduction of nuclear radiation
measurements, as also in the execution and analysis of reactor physics
experiments using the CROCUS reactor.
ObjectiveTo gain hands-on experience in the conduction of nuclear radiation
measurements, as also in the execution and analysis of reactor physics
experiments using the CROCUS reactor.
Content- Radiation detector systems, alpha and beta particles
- Radiation detector systems, gamma spectroscopy
- Introduction to neutron detectors (He-3, BF3)
- Slowing-down area (Fermi age) of Pu-Be neutrons in H2O
- Approach-to-critical experiments
- Buckling measurements
- Reactor power calibration
- Control rod calibration
LiteratureDistributed documents, recommended book chapters
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite for: Special Topics in Reactor Physics (2nd sem.)
151-2015-00LReactor Technology (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
O4 credits3GH.‑M. Prasser, external organisers
AbstractBasic heat removal phenomena in a reactor core, limits for heat generation and technological consequences arising from fuel, cladding and coolant properties, main principles of reactor thermal design, as well as the general design of the nuclear power plant with its main and auxiliary systems are explained. The system technology of the most important thermal and fast reactor types is introduced.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to: (1) Understand design principles of nuclear reactors, (2) Understand purpose and function of main reactor and power plant components and subsystems, (3) assess and evaluate the performance of reactor types, (4) systematize reactor system components, (5) formulate safety requirements for reactor systems
Content- Fuel rod, LWR fuel elements
- Temperature field in fuel rod
- Reactor core, design
- Flux and heat source distribution, cooling channel
- Single-phase convective heat transfer, axial temperature profiles
- Boiling crisis and DNB ratio
- Pressurized water reactors, design
- Primary circuit design
- Steam generator heat transfer, steam generator types
- Boiling water reactors
- Reactor design
- LWR power plant technology, main and auxiliary systems
- Breeding and transmutation, purpose of generation IV systems
- Properties of different coolants and technological consequences
- Introduction into gas-cooled reactors, heavy water moderated reactors, sodium and led cooled fast reactors, molten salt reactors, accelerator driven systems
LiteratureDistributed documents, recommended book chapters
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired prior knowledge: Neutronics
Prerequisite for: Nuclear Safety (2nd sem.)
151-2043-00LRadiation Biology, Protection and Applications (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
O4 credits3Gexternal organisers
AbstractAn introductory course in the basic concepts of radiation detection and interactions and energy deposition by ionizing radiation in matter, radioisotope production and its applications in medicine, industry and research. The course includes presentations, lecture notes, problem sets and seminars.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:

Explain the basic physics principles that underpin radiotherapy, e.g. types of radiation, atomic structure, etc.

Explain the interaction mechanisms of ionizing radiation at keV and MeV energies with matter.

Explain the principles of radiation dosimetry.

Explain the principles of therapeutic radiation physics including X-rays, electron beam physics, radioactive sources, use of unsealed sources and Brachytherapy.

Describe how to use radiotherapy equipment both for tumour localisation, planning and treatment.

Define quality assurance and quality control, in the context of radiotherapy and the legal requirements.

Explain the principles and practice of radiation protection, dose limits, screening and protection mechanisms.

Explain the use of radiation in industrial and research applications.
ContentBasics: radiation sources and interaction with matter, radioisotope production using reactors and accelerators, radiation protection and shielding.
Medical applications: diagnostic tools, radiopharmaceuticals, cancer treatment methodologies such as brachytherapy, neutron capture therapy and proton therapy.
Industrial applications: radiation gauges, radiochemistry, tracer techniques, radioisotope batteries, sterilization, etc.
Applications in research: dating by nuclear methods, applications in environmental and life sciences, etc.
151-2021-00LHydraulic Turbomachines (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W4 credits4Vexternal organisers
AbstractMastering the scientific design of a hydraulic machine, pump and turbine, by using the most advanced engineering design tools . For each chapters the theoretical basis are first established and then practical solutions are discussed with the help of recent design examples.
ObjectiveMastering the scientific design of a hydraulic machine, pump and turbine, by using the most advanced engineering design tools . For each chapters the theoretical basis are first established and then practical solutions are discussed with the help of recent design examples.
Content- Turbomachine equations, mechanical power balance in a hydraulic
machines, moment of momentum balance applied to the runner/impeller,
generalized Euler equation.
- Hydraulic characteristic of a reaction turbine, a Pelton turbine and a
pump, losses and efficiencies of a turbomachine, real hydraulic
characteristics.
- Similtude laws, non dimensional coefficients, reduced scale model
testing, scale effects.
- Cavitation, hydraulic machine setting, operating range, adaptation to the
piping system, operating stability, start stop transient operation, runaway.
- Reaction turbine design: general procedure, general project layout,
design of a Francis runner, design of the spiral casing and the distributor,
draft tube role, CFD validation of the design, design fix, reduced scale
model experimental validation.
- Pelton turbine design: general procedure, project layout, injector design,
bucket design, mechanical problems.
- Centrifugal pump design: general architecture, energetic loss model in
the diffuser and/or the volute, volute design, operating stability.
LiteratureP. HENRY: Turbomachines hydrauliques - Choix illustré de réalisation marquantes, PPUR, Lausanne, 1992.
Notes de cours polycopiées et littérature spécialisée (IMHEF, industrie, associations scientifiques, congrès, etc.).
Titre /
Title
Hydraulic turbomachines (ME-453)
Matière
Prerequisites / NoticePrérequis:
Mécanique des milieux continus; Introduction aux turbomachines.
Préparation pour:
Choix des équipements hydrauliques; Projets et travail pratique de
Master
151-2023-00LNuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W4 credits4Gexternal organisers
AbstractThe goal of the course is to provide the physics and technology basis for controlled fusion research, from the main elements of plasma physics to the reactor concepts.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:
- Design the main elements of a fusion reactor
- Identify the main physics challenges on the way to fusion
- Identify the main technological challenges of fusion
Content1) Basics of thermonuclear fusion
2) The plasma state and its collective effects
3) Charged particle motion and collisional effects
4) Fluid description of a plasma
5) Plasma equilibrium and stability
6) Magnetic confinement: Tokamak and Stellarator
7) Waves in plasma
8) Wave-particle interactions
9) Heating and non inductive current drive by radio frequency waves
10) Heating and non inductive current drive by neutral particle beams
11) Material science and technology: Low and high Temperature superconductor - Properties of material under irradiation
12) Some nuclear aspects of a fusion reactor: Tritium production
13) Licensing a fusion reactor: safety, nuclear waste
14) Inertial confinement
Literature- J. Freidberg, Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy, Cambridge University Press, 2007
- F.F. Chen, Introductionto Plasma Physcs, 2nd edition, Plenum Press, 1984
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired prior knowledge:
Basic knowledge of electricity and magnetism, and of simple concepts of fluids
151-2025-00LIntroduction to Particle Accelerators (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W4 credits4Gexternal organisers
AbstractThe course presents basic physics ideas underlying the workings of modern accelerators. We will examine key features and limitations of these machines as used in accelerator driven sciences like high energy physics, materials and life sciences.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:
- Design basic linear and non-linear charged particles optics
- Elaborate basic ideas of physics of accelerators
- Use a computer code for optics design
- Optimize accelerator design for a given application
- Estimate main beam parameters of a given accelerator
ContentOverview, history and fundamentals
Transverse particle dynamics (linear and nonlinear)
Longitudinal particle dynamics
Linear accelerators
Circular accelerators
Acceleration and RF-technology
Beam diagnostics
Accelerator magnets
Injection and extraction systems
Synchrotron radiation
LiteratureRecommended during the course
Prerequisites / NoticePrérequis: Notion de relativité restreinte et d'électrodynamique
151-2041-00LIntroduction to Medical Radiation Physics (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W4 credits3Gexternal organisers
AbstractThis course covers the physical principles underlying medical imaging using ionizing radiation (radiography, fluoroscopy, CT, SPECT, PET).
ObjectiveThe focus is not only on risk and dose to the patient and staff, but also on an objective description of the image quality.
ContentPhysics of radiography: X-ray production, Radiation-patient interaction, Image detection and display

Image quality: Wagner's taxonomy, MTF, NPS, contrast, SNR, DQE, NEQ, CNR

Dose to the patient: External irradiation, Internal contamination, compartmental models

Physics of computer tomography (CT)

Risk and radiation: Rational risk and state of our knowledge, Psychological aspects, Ethics and communication

Physics of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

Physics of mammography

Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and hypothesis testing: Link between medical diagnostic and statistical hypothesis testing, Sensitivity, specificity, prevalence, predictive values

Physics of radioscopy

Model observers in medical imaging: Human visual characteristics and their quantification, Bayesian cost and Ideal model observer, Anthropomorphic model observers, Detection experiments (rating, M-AFC, yes-no)

Physics of positron emission tomography (PET)

Physics of resonance magnetic imaging
151-2047-00LPhysics of Atoms, Nuclei and Elementary Particles (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W4 credits4Gexternal organisers
AbstractIn this lecture, symmetry and conservation law are applied to derive wave functions for elementary particles. Relativistic wave functions are analysed and applied for massive and massless particles. Different ideas on antiparticles are explored.
ObjectivePresent the basic and common notions needed for describing atomic,
nuclear and elementary particle physics.
Content- Introduction to general concepts commonly used in atomic, nuclear and elementary particle physics.
- Symmetry principles.
- Description of forces.
- Scaler, spinor and vector field
- Relativic wave function
Lecture notesLecture notes and problems are haded out prior to the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired courses: Quantum mechanics, electrodynamics and special relativity

Recommended courses: Nuclear and particle physics

Important concepts to start the course: Symmetry and conservation, lorentz invariance and spin and statistics
151-2049-00LEnergy Conversion and Renewable Energy (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W3 credits3Gexternal organisers
AbstractThe goal of the lecture is to present the principles of the energy conversion for conventional and renewable energy resources and to explain the most important parameters that define the energy conversion efficiency, resources implications and economics of the energy conversion technologies.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:
- Explain the efficiency and the main emission sources of energy conversion processes
- Quantify the efficiency and the main emission sources of energy conversion processes
- Model energy conversion systems and industrial processes
- Draw the energy balances of an energy conversion system
- Elaborate energy conversion scenarios
- Describe the principles and limitations of the main energy conversion technologies
- Compare energy conversion systems
Content- Overview of energy stakes
- Thermodynamic principles relevant for energy conversion systems, review of thermodynamic power cycles, heat pumps and refrigeration cycles, co-generation
- Carbon capture and sequestration
- Renewable energy vectors, their physical principles and essential equations: Solar (photovoltaics and thermal - collectors/concentrators), geothermal, biomass (a.o. gasification, biogases, liquid biofuels), hydro, wind
- Fuel cells and hydrogen as energy vector
- Storage of energy: Batteries, compressed air, pumped hydro, thermal storage
- Integrated urban systems
Lecture notesSlides, videos and other documents are available on moodle (
Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired courses: Physics I and Physics II

Important concepts to start the course: Conservation principles (energy, mass, momentum)
151-2051-00LRadiation Detection (EPFL)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at EPFL.
W3 credits3Gexternal organisers
AbstractThe course presents the detection of ionizing radiation in the keV and MeV energy ranges. It introduces the physical processes of radiation/matter interaction. It covers the several steps of detection, and the detectors, instrumentations and measurements methods commonly used in the nuclear field.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, the student must be able to:
- Explain interaction processes of ionising radiation and matter
- Describe the production of a detection signal and its processing
- Explain the operation of all types of commonly used detectors
- Assess / Evaluate the detection system and method required for a specific measurement
Content- Interaction of radiation with matter at low energies: X-rays/gammas, charged particles and neutrons up to MeV range, ionisation, nuclear cross sections.
- Characteristics and types of detectors: gas detectors, semiconductor detectors, scintillators and optical fibers, fission chambers, meshed and pixel detectors
- Signal processing and analysis: types of electronics, signal collection and amplification, particle discrimination, spatial and time resolution
- Nuclear instrumentation and measurements: principle of measurements, spectrometry, common detection instrumentations, applications in nuclear engineering and R&D.
LiteratureRadiation detection and measurement, Glenn F. Knoll. Wiley 2010
Practical Gamma-Ray Spectrometry, Gordon R. Gilmore, Wiley & Sons 2008
151-2005-00LElective Project Nuclear Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Only for Nuclear Enginering MSc.

The subject of the Elective Project and the choice of the supervisor (ETH or EPFL professor) are to be approved in advance by the tutor.
W8 credits17AProfessors
AbstractThe elective project has the purpose to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems related to nuclear technology. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. Tutors propose the subject of the project, elaborate the project plan, and define the roadmap together with their students, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe elective project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's programme.
3. Semester (PSI)
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0150-00LAdvanced Topics in Nuclear Reactor Materials
Students registered at ETH Zurich have to enroll to this course at ETH. EPFL students can enroll to this course directly at EPFL.
W4 credits3GM. A. Pouchon, P. J.‑P. Spätig, M. Streit
AbstractThe course deals with the important challenges for materials (structural and fuel) for current and advanced nuclear power plants. Experimental techniques and tools used for working with active materials are discussed in detail. Students will be well acquainted with analytical and modeling methodologies for damage assessment and residual life determination and with the behavior of high burnup fuel.
ObjectiveThe behaviour of materials in nuclear reactors determines the reliability and safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Life extension and the understanding of fuel behavior under high burn-up conditions is of central importance for current-day NPPs. Advanced future systems (fission and fusion) need materials meeting additional challenges such as high temperatures and/or high doses.
The course will highlight the above needs from different points of view. Experimental methods for the control and analysis of nuclear components and materials in operating NPPs will be presented. Advanced analytical and modeling tools will be introduced for characterization and understanding of irradiation damage, creep, environment effects, etc. Insights acquired from recent experimental programs into high burnup fuel behavior under hypothetical accident conditions (RIA, LOCA) will be presented. Materials for advanced future nuclear plants will be discussed.
151-2037-00LNuclear Computations Lab
Students registered at ETH Zurich have to enroll to this course at ETH. EPFL students can enroll to this course directly at EPFL.
W3 credits3GA. Pautz, H. Ferroukhi, further lecturers
AbstractTo acquire hands-on experience with the running of large computer codes in relation to the static analysis of nuclear reactor cores and the multi-physics simulation of nuclear power plant (NPP) dynamic behaviour.
ObjectiveTo acquire hands-on experience with the running of large computer codes in relation to the static analysis of nuclear reactor cores and the multi-physics simulation of nuclear power plant (NPP) dynamic behaviour.
Content- Lattice (assembly) calculations
- Thermal-hydraulic analysis
- Reactor core analysis
- Multi-physics core dynamics calculations
- Best-estimate NPP transient analysis
LiteratureDistributed documents, recommended book chapters
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired prior knowledge: Special Topics in Reactor Physics, Nuclear Safety
151-2039-00LBeyond-Design-Basis Safety
Students registered at ETH Zurich have to enroll to this course at ETH. EPFL students can enroll to this course directly at EPFL.
W3 credits2VH.‑M. Prasser, L. Fernandez Moguel, B. Jäckel, T. Lind, D. Paladino
AbstractComprehensive knowledge is provided on the phenomena during a Beyond Design Bases Accident (BDBA) in a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), on their modeling as well as on countermeasures taken against radioactive releases into the environment, both by Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG), together with technical backfitting measures in existing plants and an extended design of new NPP.
ObjectiveDeep understanding of the processes associated with core degradation and fuel melting in case of sustained lack of Core Cooling Systems, potential threats to the containment integrity, release and transport of active and inactive materials, the function of the containment, countermeasures mitigating release of radioactive material into the environment (accident management measures, back-fitting and extended design), assessment of timing and amounts of released radioactive material (source term).
ContentPhysical basic understanding of severe accident phenomenology: loss of core cooling, core dryout, fuel heat-up, fuel rod cladding oxidation and hydrogen production, loss of core coolability and, fuel melting, melt relocation and melt accumulation in the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), accident evolution at high and low reactor coolant system pressure , heat flux from the molten debris in the lower plenum and its distribution to the lower head, RPV failure and melt ejection, , direct containment heating, molten corium and concrete interaction, in- and ex-vessel molten fuel coolant interaction (steam explosions), hydrogen distribution in the containment, hydrogen risk (deflagration , transition to detonation), pressure buildup and containment vulnerability, countermeasures mitigating/avoiding hydrogen deflagration, formation, transport and deposition of radioactive aerosols, iodine behavior, plant ventilation-filtration systems, filtered venting to avoid containment failure and mitigate activity release into the environment, containment bypass scenarios, source term assessment, in-vessel and ex-vessel corium retention, behavior of fuel elements in the spent fuel pool during long-lasting station blackout, cladding oxidation in air, discussion of occurred severe accidents (Harrisburg, Chernobyl, Fukushima), internal and external emergency response. Probabilistic assessment and interfacing with severe accident phenomenology.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be distributed
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Recommended courses: 151-0156-00L Safety of Nuclear Power Plants plus either 151-0163-00L Nuclear Energy Conversion or 151-2015-00L Reactor Technology
151-2045-00LDecommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants
Students registered at ETH Zurich have to enroll to this course at ETH. EPFL students can enroll to this course directly at EPFL.
W4 credits3GA. Pautz, M. Brandauer, F. Leibundgut, M. Pantelias Garcés, H.‑M. Prasser
AbstractIntroduction to aspects of Nuclear Power Plant decommissioning including project planning and management, costs and financing, radiological characterization, dismantling/decontamination technologies, safety aspects and radioactive waste management considerations.
ObjectiveAim of this course is to provide the students with an overview of the multidisciplinary issues that have to be addressed for the successful decommissioning of NPPs. Students will get exposed to principles of project management, operations management, cost estimations, radiological characterization, technologies relevant to the safe dismantling of NPPs and best-practice in the context of radioactive waste management.
ContentLegal framework, project management and operations methods and tools, cost estimation approaches and methods, nuclear calculations and on-site radiological characterization and inventorying, state-of-the-art technologies for decontamination and dismantling, safety considerations, state-of-the-art practice for radioactive waste treatment, packaging and transport, interface with radioactive waste management and disposal. The course will additionally include student visits to relevant nuclear sites in Switzerland and Germany.
Lecture notesSlides will be handed out.
Literature1. "Nuclear Decommissioning: Planning, Execution and International Experience", M. Laraia, Woodhead Publishing, 2012
2. "Cost Estimation: Methods and Tools", G.M. Mislick and D.A. Nussbaum, Wiley, 2015
3. "The Oxford Handbook of Megaproject Management", B. Flyvbjerg, Oxford University Press, 2017
151-2005-00LElective Project Nuclear Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Only for Nuclear Enginering MSc.

The subject of the Elective Project and the choice of the supervisor (ETH or EPFL professor) are to be approved in advance by the tutor.
W8 credits17AProfessors
AbstractThe elective project has the purpose to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems related to nuclear technology. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. Tutors propose the subject of the project, elaborate the project plan, and define the roadmap together with their students, as well as monitor the overall execution.
ObjectiveThe elective project is designed to train the students in the solution of specific engineering problems. This makes use of the technical and social skills acquired during the master's programme.
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