Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Atmospheric and Climate Science Master Information
Modules
Weather Systems and Atmospheric Dynamics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1221-00LDynamics of Large-Scale Atmospheric Flow Information W4 credits2V + 1UH. Wernli, S. Pfahl
AbstractDynamic, synoptic Meteorology
ObjectiveUnderstanding the dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow
ContentDynamical Meteorology is concerned with the dynamical processes of the
earth's atmosphere. The fundamental equations of motion in the atmosphere will be discussed along with the dynamics and interactions of synoptic system - i.e. the low and high pressure systems that determine our weather. The motion of such systems can be understood in terms of quasi-geostrophic theory. The lecture course provides a derivation of the mathematical basis along with some interpretations and applications of the concept.
Lecture notesDynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow
Literature- Holton J.R., An introduction to Dynamic Meteorogy. Academic Press, fourth edition 2004,
- Pichler H., Dynamik der Atmosphäre, Bibliographisches Institut, 456 pp. 1997
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I, II, Environmental Fluid Dynamics
651-4053-05LBoundary Layer MeteorologyW4 credits3GM. Rotach, P. Calanca
AbstractThe Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) constitutes the interface between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Theory on transport processes in the PBL and their dynamics is provided. This course treats theoretical background and idealized concepts. These are contrasted to real world applications and current research issues.
ObjectiveOverall goals of this course are given below. Focus is on the theoretical background and idealised concepts.
Students have basic knowledge on atmospheric turbulence and theoretical as well as practical approaches to treat Planetary Boundary Layer flows. They are familiar with the relevant processes (turbulent transport, forcing) within, and typical states of the Planetary Boundary Layer. Idealized concepts are known as well as their adaptations under real surface conditions (as for example over complex topography).
Content- Introduction
- Turbulence
- Statistical tratment of turbulence, turbulent transport
- Conservation equations in a turbulent flow
- Closure problem and closure assumptions
- Scaling and similarity theory
- Spectral characteristics
- Concepts for non-ideal boundary layer conditions
Lecture notesavailable (i.e. in English)
Literature- Stull, R.B.: 1988, "An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology", (Kluwer), 666 pp.
- Panofsky, H. A. and Dutton, J.A.: 1984, "Atmospheric Turbulence, Models and Methods for Engineering Applications", (J. Wiley), 397 pp.
- Kaimal JC and Finningan JJ: 1994, Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows, Oxford University Press, 289 pp.
- Wyngaard JC: 2010, Turbulence in the Atmosphere, Cambridge University Press, 393pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeUmwelt-Fluiddynamik (701-0479-00L) (environment fluid dynamics) or equivalent and basic knowledge in atmospheric science
Climate Processes and Feedbacks
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1235-00LCloud Microphysics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.
W4 credits2V + 1UZ. A. Kanji, U. Lohmann
AbstractClouds are a fascinating atmospheric phenomenon central to the hydrological cycle and the Earth`s climate. Interactions between cloud particles can result in precipitation, glaciation or evaporation of the cloud depending on its microstructure and microphysical processes.
ObjectiveThe learning objective of this course is that students understand the formation of clouds and precipitation and can apply learned principles to interpret atmospheric observations of clouds and precipitation.
Contentsee: Link
Lecture notesThis course will be designed as a reading course in 1-2 small groups of 8 students maximum. It will be based on the textbook below. The students are expected to read chapters of this textbook prior to the class so that open issues, fascinating and/or difficult aspects can be discussed in depth.
LiteraturePao K. Wang: Physics and dynamics of clouds and precipitation, Cambridge University Press, 2012
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget group: Master students in Atmosphere and Climate
701-1251-00LLand-Climate Dynamics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 36.
W3 credits2GS. I. Seneviratne, E. L. Davin
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to provide fundamental background on the role of land surface processes (vegetation, soil moisture dynamics, land energy and water balances) in the climate system. The course consists of 2 contact hours per week, including lectures, group projects and computer exercises.
ObjectiveThe students can understand the role of land processes and associated feedbacks in the climate system.
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides will be made available
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory lectures in atmospheric and climate science
Atmospheric physics -> Link
and/or
Climate systems -> Link
Atmospheric Composition and Cycles
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0572-00LAerosols I: Physical and Chemical PrinciplesW4 credits2V + 1UM. Gysel Beer, U. Baltensperger, H. Burtscher
AbstractAerosols I deals with basic physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles. The importance of aerosols in the atmosphere and in other fields is discussed.
ObjectiveKnowledge of basic physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles and their importance in the atmosphere and in other fields
Contentphysical and chemical properties of aerosols, aerosol dynamics (diffusion, coagulation...), optical properties (light scattering, -absorption, -extinction), aerosol production methods, experimental methods for physical and chemical characterization.
Lecture notesmateriel is distributed during the lecture
Literature- Kulkarni, P., Baron, P. A., and Willeke, K.: Aerosol Measurement - Principles, Techniques, and Applications. Wiley, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2011.
- Hinds, W. C.: Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1999.
- Colbeck I. (ed.) Physical and Chemical Properties of Aerosols, Blackie Academic & Professional, London, 1998.
- Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N.: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change. Hoboken, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2006
701-1233-00LStratospheric Chemistry Information W4 credits2V + 1UT. Peter, A. Stenke
AbstractThermodynamical and kinetic basics: bi- and termolecular reactions, photo-dissociation. Chemical family concept. Chapman chemistry. Radical reactions of oxygen species with nitric oxide, active halogens and odd hydrogen. Ozone depletion cycles. Methane depletion and ozone production in the lower stratosphere. Heterogeneous chemistry on background aerosol. Chemistry and dynamics of the ozone hole.
ObjectiveThe lecture gives an overview on the manifold reactions which occur in the gas phase, in stratospheric aerosol droplets and in polar cloud particles. The focus is on the chemistry of stratospheric ozone and its influence through natural and anthropogenic effects. Especially the intercontinental air traffic and the ozone depletion caused by FCKW CFC in the mid-latitude and the polar regions as well as coupling with the greenhouse effect.
ContentShort presentation of thermodynamical and kinetic basics of chemical reactions: bi- and termolecular reactions, photo-dissociation. Introduction to the chemical family concept: active species, their source gases and reservoir gases. Detailed treatment of the pure oxygen family (odd oxygen) according to the Chapman chemistry. Radical reactions of the oxygen species with nitric oxide, active halogens (chlorine and bromine) and odd hydrogen. Ozone depletion cycles. Methane depletion and ozone production in the lower stratosphere (photo-smog reactions). Heterogeneous chemistry on the background aerosol and its significance for heavy air traffic. Chemistry and dynamics of the ozone hole: Formation of polar stratospheric clouds and chloride activation.
Lecture notesDocuments are provided in the contact hours.
Literature- Basseur, G. und S. Solomon, Aeronomy of the Middle Atmosphere, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 3rd Rev edition (December 30, 2005).
- John H. Seinfeld and Spyros N. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley, New York, 1998.
- WMO, Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2014, Report No. 55, Geneva, 2015.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basics in physical chemistry are required and an overview equivalent to the bachelor course in atmospheric chemistry (lecture 701-0471-01) is expected.

701-1233-00 V starts in the first week of the semester. The exercises 701-1233-00 U will start only in the 2nd week of the semester.
Climate History and Paleoclimatology
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4049-00LConceptual and Quantitative Methods in Geochemistry
For this course the successful completion of the BSc-course "Geochemistry" (651-3400-00L) is a condition.
W3 credits2GO. Bachmann, M. Schönbächler, D. Vance, K. W. Burton
AbstractThis course will introduce some of the main quantitative methods available for the quantitative treatment of geochemical data, as well as the main modelling tools. Emphasis will both be on conceptual understanding of these methods as well as on their practical application, using key software packages to analyse real geochemical datasets.
ObjectiveDevelopment of a basic knowledge and understanding of the main tools available for the quantitative analysis of geochemical data.
ContentThe following approaches will be discussed in detail: major and trace element modelling of magmas, with application to igneous systems; methods and statistics for calculation of isochrons and model ages; reservoir dynamics and one-dimensional modelling of ocean chemistry; modelling speciation in aqueous (hydrothermal, fresh water sea water) fluids.

We will discuss how these methods are applied in a range of Earth Science fields, from cosmochemistry, through mantle and crustal geochemistry, volcanology and igneous petrology, to chemical oceanography.

A special emphasis will be put on dealing with geochemical problems through modeling. Where relevant, software packages will be introduced and applied to real geochemical data.
Lecture notesSlides of lectures will be available.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-requisite: Geochemistry (651-3400-00L), Isotope Geochemistry and Geochronology (651-3501-00L).
651-4057-00LClimate History and PalaeoclimatologyW3 credits2GH. Stoll, B. Ausin Gonzalez, A. Fernandez Bremer
AbstractClimate history and paleoclimatology explores how the major features of the earth's climate system have varied in the past, and the driving forces and feedbacks for these changes. The major topics include the earth's CO2 concentration and mean temperature, the size and stability of ice sheets and sea level, the amount and distribution of precipitation, and the ocean heat transport.
ObjectiveThe student will be able to describe the factors that regulate the earth's mean temperature and the distribution of different climates over the earth. Students will be able to use and understand the construction of simple quantitative models of the Earth's carbon cycle and temperature in Excel, to solve problems from the long term balancing of sinks and sources of carbon, to the Anthropogenic carbon cycle changes of the Anthropocene. Students will be able to interpret evidence of past climate changes from the main climate indicators or proxies recovered in geological records. Students will be able to use data from climate proxies to test if a given hypothesized mechanism for the climate change is supported or refuted. Students will be able to compare the magnitudes and rates of past changes in the carbon cycle, ice sheets, hydrological cycle, and ocean circulation, with predictions for climate changes over the next century to millennia.
Content1. Overview of elements of the climate system and earth energy balance
2. The Carbon cycle - long and short term regulation and feedbacks of atmospheric CO2. What regulates atmospheric CO2 over long tectonic timescales of millions to tens of millions of years? What are the drivers and feedbacks of transient perturbations like at the latest Palocene? What drives CO2 variations over glacial cycles and what drives it in the Anthropocene?
3. Ice sheets and sea level - What do expansionist glaciers want? What is the natural range of variation in the earth's ice sheets and the consequent effect on sea level? How do cyclic variations in the earth's orbit affect the size of ice sheets under modern climate and under past warmer climates? What conditions the mean size and stability or fragility of the large polar ice caps and is their evidence that they have dynamic behavior? What rates and magnitudes of sea level change have accompanied past ice sheet variations? When is the most recent time of sea level higher than modern, and by how much? What lessons do these have for the future?
4. Atmospheric circulation and variations in the earth's hydrological cycle - How variable are the earth's precipitation regimes? How large are the orbital scale variations in global monsoon systems? Will mean climate change El Nino frequency and intensity? What factors drive change in mid and high-latitude precipitation systems? Is there evidence that changes in water availability have played a role in the rise, demise, or dispersion of past civilizations?
5. The Ocean heat transport - How stable or fragile is the ocean heat conveyor, past and present? When did modern deepwater circulation develop? Will Greenland melting and shifts in precipitation bands, cause the North Atlantic Overturning Circulation to collapse? When and why has this happened before?
651-4043-00LSedimentology II: Biological and Chemical Processes in Lacustrine and Marine Systems
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the MSc-course "Sedimentology I" (651-4041-00L).
W3 credits2GV. Picotti, A. Gilli
AbstractThe course will focus on biological amd chemical aspects of sedimentation in marine environments. Marine sedimentation will be traced from coast to deep-sea. The use of stable isotopes palaeoceanography will be discussed. Neritic, hemipelagic and pelagic sediments will be used as proxies for environmental change during times of major perturbations of climate and oceanography.
Objective-You will understand chemistry and biology of the marine carbonate system
-You will be able to relate carbonate mineralogy with facies and environmental conditions
-You will be familiar with cool-water and warm-water carbonates
-You will see carbonate and organic-carbon rich sediments as part of the global carbon cycle
-You will be able to recognize links between climate and marine carbonate systems (e.g. acidification of oceans and reef growth)
-You will be able to use geological archives as source of information on global change
-You will have an overview of marine sedimentation through time
Content-carbonates,: chemistry, mineralogy, biology
-carbonate sedimentation from the shelf to the deep sea
-carbonate facies
-cool-water and warm-water carbonates
-organic-carbon and black shales
-C-cycle, carbonates, Corg : CO2 sources and sink
-Carbonates: their geochemical proxies for environmental change: stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, Sr
-marine sediments thorugh geological time
-carbonates and evaporites
-lacustrine carbonates
-economic aspects of limestone
Lecture notesno script. scientific articles will be distributed during the course
LiteratureWe will read and critically discuss scientific articles relevant for "biological and chemical processes in marine and lacustrine systems"
Prerequisites / NoticeThe grading of students is based on in-class exercises and end-semester examination.
Hydrology and Water Cycle
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1251-00LLand-Climate Dynamics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 36.
W3 credits2GS. I. Seneviratne, E. L. Davin
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to provide fundamental background on the role of land surface processes (vegetation, soil moisture dynamics, land energy and water balances) in the climate system. The course consists of 2 contact hours per week, including lectures, group projects and computer exercises.
ObjectiveThe students can understand the role of land processes and associated feedbacks in the climate system.
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides will be made available
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory lectures in atmospheric and climate science
Atmospheric physics -> Link
and/or
Climate systems -> Link
102-0237-00LHydrology IIW3 credits2GP. Burlando, S. Fatichi
AbstractThe course presents advanced hydrological analyses of rainfall-runoff processes. The course is given in English.
ObjectiveTools for hydrological modelling are discussed at the event and continuous scale. The focus is on the description of physical processes and their modelisation with practical examples.
ContentMonitoring of hydrological systems (point and space monitoring, remote sensing). The use of GIS in hydrology (practical applications). General concepts of watershed modelling. Infiltration. IUH models. Event based rainfall-runoff modelling. Continuous rainfall-runoff models (components and prrocesses). Example of modelling with the PRMS model. Calibration and validation of models. Flood routing (unsteady flow, hydrologic routing, examples). The course contains an extensive semester project.
Lecture notesParts of the script for "Hydrology I" are used. Also available are the overhead transparencies used in the lectures. The semester project consists of a two part instruction manual.
LiteratureAdditional literature is presented during the course.
701-1253-00LAnalysis of Climate and Weather Data Information W3 credits2GC. Frei
AbstractObservation networks and numerical climate and forcasting models deliver large primary datasets. The use of this data in practice and in research requires specific techniques of statistical data analysis. This lecture introduces a range of frequently used techniques, and enables students to apply them and to properly interpret their results.
ObjectiveObservation networks and numerical climate and forcasting models deliver large primary datasets. The use of this data in practice and in research requires specific techniques of statistical data analysis. This lecture introduces a range of frequently used techniques, and enables students to apply them and to properly interpret their results.
ContentIntroduction into the theoretical background and the practical application of methods of data analysis in meteorology and climatology.

Topics: exploratory methods, hypothesis testing, analysis of climate trends, measuring the skill of climate and forecasting models, analysis of extremes, principal component analysis and maximum covariance analysis.

The lecture also provides an introduction into R, a programming language and graphics tool frequently used for data analysis in meteorology and climatology. During hands-on computer exercises the student will become familiar with the practical application of the methods.
Lecture notesDocumentation and supporting material include:
- documented view graphs used during the lecture
- excercise sets and solutions
- R-packages with software and example datasets for exercise sessions

All material is made available via the lecture web-page.
LiteratureSuggested literature:
- Wilks D.S., 2005: Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Science. (2nd edition). International Geophysical Series, Academic Press Inc. (London)
- Coles S., 2001: An introduction to statistical modeling of extreme values. Springer, London. 208 pp.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Atmosphäre, Mathematik IV: Statistik, Anwendungsnahes Programmieren.
651-4053-05LBoundary Layer MeteorologyW4 credits3GM. Rotach, P. Calanca
AbstractThe Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) constitutes the interface between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Theory on transport processes in the PBL and their dynamics is provided. This course treats theoretical background and idealized concepts. These are contrasted to real world applications and current research issues.
ObjectiveOverall goals of this course are given below. Focus is on the theoretical background and idealised concepts.
Students have basic knowledge on atmospheric turbulence and theoretical as well as practical approaches to treat Planetary Boundary Layer flows. They are familiar with the relevant processes (turbulent transport, forcing) within, and typical states of the Planetary Boundary Layer. Idealized concepts are known as well as their adaptations under real surface conditions (as for example over complex topography).
Content- Introduction
- Turbulence
- Statistical tratment of turbulence, turbulent transport
- Conservation equations in a turbulent flow
- Closure problem and closure assumptions
- Scaling and similarity theory
- Spectral characteristics
- Concepts for non-ideal boundary layer conditions
Lecture notesavailable (i.e. in English)
Literature- Stull, R.B.: 1988, "An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology", (Kluwer), 666 pp.
- Panofsky, H. A. and Dutton, J.A.: 1984, "Atmospheric Turbulence, Models and Methods for Engineering Applications", (J. Wiley), 397 pp.
- Kaimal JC and Finningan JJ: 1994, Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows, Oxford University Press, 289 pp.
- Wyngaard JC: 2010, Turbulence in the Atmosphere, Cambridge University Press, 393pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeUmwelt-Fluiddynamik (701-0479-00L) (environment fluid dynamics) or equivalent and basic knowledge in atmospheric science
Electives
The students are free to choose individually from the entire course offer of ETH Zürich and the universities of Zürich and Bern.
Weather Systems and Atmospheric Dynamics
Courses are only offered in FS.
Climate Processes and Feedbacks
Two additional courses are offered in HS by University of Berne.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1221-00LDynamics of Large-Scale Atmospheric Flow Information W4 credits2V + 1UH. Wernli, S. Pfahl
AbstractDynamic, synoptic Meteorology
ObjectiveUnderstanding the dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow
ContentDynamical Meteorology is concerned with the dynamical processes of the
earth's atmosphere. The fundamental equations of motion in the atmosphere will be discussed along with the dynamics and interactions of synoptic system - i.e. the low and high pressure systems that determine our weather. The motion of such systems can be understood in terms of quasi-geostrophic theory. The lecture course provides a derivation of the mathematical basis along with some interpretations and applications of the concept.
Lecture notesDynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow
Literature- Holton J.R., An introduction to Dynamic Meteorogy. Academic Press, fourth edition 2004,
- Pichler H., Dynamik der Atmosphäre, Bibliographisches Institut, 456 pp. 1997
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I, II, Environmental Fluid Dynamics
651-4057-00LClimate History and PalaeoclimatologyW3 credits2GH. Stoll, B. Ausin Gonzalez, A. Fernandez Bremer
AbstractClimate history and paleoclimatology explores how the major features of the earth's climate system have varied in the past, and the driving forces and feedbacks for these changes. The major topics include the earth's CO2 concentration and mean temperature, the size and stability of ice sheets and sea level, the amount and distribution of precipitation, and the ocean heat transport.
ObjectiveThe student will be able to describe the factors that regulate the earth's mean temperature and the distribution of different climates over the earth. Students will be able to use and understand the construction of simple quantitative models of the Earth's carbon cycle and temperature in Excel, to solve problems from the long term balancing of sinks and sources of carbon, to the Anthropogenic carbon cycle changes of the Anthropocene. Students will be able to interpret evidence of past climate changes from the main climate indicators or proxies recovered in geological records. Students will be able to use data from climate proxies to test if a given hypothesized mechanism for the climate change is supported or refuted. Students will be able to compare the magnitudes and rates of past changes in the carbon cycle, ice sheets, hydrological cycle, and ocean circulation, with predictions for climate changes over the next century to millennia.
Content1. Overview of elements of the climate system and earth energy balance
2. The Carbon cycle - long and short term regulation and feedbacks of atmospheric CO2. What regulates atmospheric CO2 over long tectonic timescales of millions to tens of millions of years? What are the drivers and feedbacks of transient perturbations like at the latest Palocene? What drives CO2 variations over glacial cycles and what drives it in the Anthropocene?
3. Ice sheets and sea level - What do expansionist glaciers want? What is the natural range of variation in the earth's ice sheets and the consequent effect on sea level? How do cyclic variations in the earth's orbit affect the size of ice sheets under modern climate and under past warmer climates? What conditions the mean size and stability or fragility of the large polar ice caps and is their evidence that they have dynamic behavior? What rates and magnitudes of sea level change have accompanied past ice sheet variations? When is the most recent time of sea level higher than modern, and by how much? What lessons do these have for the future?
4. Atmospheric circulation and variations in the earth's hydrological cycle - How variable are the earth's precipitation regimes? How large are the orbital scale variations in global monsoon systems? Will mean climate change El Nino frequency and intensity? What factors drive change in mid and high-latitude precipitation systems? Is there evidence that changes in water availability have played a role in the rise, demise, or dispersion of past civilizations?
5. The Ocean heat transport - How stable or fragile is the ocean heat conveyor, past and present? When did modern deepwater circulation develop? Will Greenland melting and shifts in precipitation bands, cause the North Atlantic Overturning Circulation to collapse? When and why has this happened before?
Atmospheric Composition and Cycles
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0635-01LAir Pollution Control Information W6 credits4GJ. Wang, B. Buchmann
AbstractThe lecture provides in the first part an introduction to the formation of air pollutants by technical processes, the emission of these chemicals into the atmosphere and their impact on air quality. The second part covers different strategies and techniques for emission reduction. The basic knowledge is deepened by the discussion of specific air pollution problems of today's society.
ObjectiveThe students gain general knowledge of the technical processes resulting in air pollution and study the methods used for air pollution control. The students can identify major air pollution sources and understand the methods for measuring pollutants, collecting and analyzing data. The students can suggest and evaluate possible control methods and equipment, design control systems and estimate their efficiency and efforts.
The students know the different strategies of air pollution control and are familiar with their scientific fundamentals. They are able to incorporate goals concerning air quality into their engineering work.
ContentPart 1 Emission, Immission, Transmission
Fluxes of pollutants and their environmental impact:
- physical and chemical processes leading to emission of pollutants
- mass and energy of processes
- Emission measurement techniques and concepts
- quantification of emissions from individual and aggregated sources
- extent and development of the emissions (Switzerland and global)
- propagation and transport of pollutants (transmission)
- meteorological parameters influencing air pollution dispersion
- deterministic and stochastic models, describing air pollution dispersion
- dispersion models (Gaussian model, box model, receptor model)
- measurement concepts for ambient air (immission level)
- extent and development of ambient air mixing ratios
- goal and instrument of air pollution control

Part 2 Air Pollution Control Technologies
The reduction of the formation of pollutants is done by modifying the processes (pro-cessintegrated measures) and by different engineering operations for the cleaning of waste gas (downstream pollution control). It will be demonstrated, that the variety of these procedures can be traced back to the application of a few basic physical and chemical principles.

Procedures for the removal of particles (inertial separator, filtration, electrostatic precipitators, scrubbers) with their different mechanisms (field forces, impaction and diffusion processes) and the modelling of these mechanisms.

Procedures for the removal of gaseous pollutants and the description of the driving forces involved, as well as the equilibrium and the kinetics of the relevant processes (absorption, adsorption as well as thermal, catalytic and biological conversions).

Discussion of the technical possibilities to solve the actual air pollution problems.
Lecture notesBrigitte Buchmann, Air pollution control, Part I
Jing Wang, Air pollution control, Part II
Lecture slides and exercises
LiteratureList of literature included in script
Prerequisites / NoticeCollege lectures on basic physics, chemistry and mathematics.
Language of instruction: In German or in English.
701-1235-00LCloud Microphysics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.
W4 credits2V + 1UZ. A. Kanji, U. Lohmann
AbstractClouds are a fascinating atmospheric phenomenon central to the hydrological cycle and the Earth`s climate. Interactions between cloud particles can result in precipitation, glaciation or evaporation of the cloud depending on its microstructure and microphysical processes.
ObjectiveThe learning objective of this course is that students understand the formation of clouds and precipitation and can apply learned principles to interpret atmospheric observations of clouds and precipitation.
Contentsee: Link
Lecture notesThis course will be designed as a reading course in 1-2 small groups of 8 students maximum. It will be based on the textbook below. The students are expected to read chapters of this textbook prior to the class so that open issues, fascinating and/or difficult aspects can be discussed in depth.
LiteraturePao K. Wang: Physics and dynamics of clouds and precipitation, Cambridge University Press, 2012
Prerequisites / NoticeTarget group: Master students in Atmosphere and Climate
651-4053-05LBoundary Layer MeteorologyW4 credits3GM. Rotach, P. Calanca
AbstractThe Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) constitutes the interface between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Theory on transport processes in the PBL and their dynamics is provided. This course treats theoretical background and idealized concepts. These are contrasted to real world applications and current research issues.
ObjectiveOverall goals of this course are given below. Focus is on the theoretical background and idealised concepts.
Students have basic knowledge on atmospheric turbulence and theoretical as well as practical approaches to treat Planetary Boundary Layer flows. They are familiar with the relevant processes (turbulent transport, forcing) within, and typical states of the Planetary Boundary Layer. Idealized concepts are known as well as their adaptations under real surface conditions (as for example over complex topography).
Content- Introduction
- Turbulence
- Statistical tratment of turbulence, turbulent transport
- Conservation equations in a turbulent flow
- Closure problem and closure assumptions
- Scaling and similarity theory
- Spectral characteristics
- Concepts for non-ideal boundary layer conditions
Lecture notesavailable (i.e. in English)
Literature- Stull, R.B.: 1988, "An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology", (Kluwer), 666 pp.
- Panofsky, H. A. and Dutton, J.A.: 1984, "Atmospheric Turbulence, Models and Methods for Engineering Applications", (J. Wiley), 397 pp.
- Kaimal JC and Finningan JJ: 1994, Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows, Oxford University Press, 289 pp.
- Wyngaard JC: 2010, Turbulence in the Atmosphere, Cambridge University Press, 393pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeUmwelt-Fluiddynamik (701-0479-00L) (environment fluid dynamics) or equivalent and basic knowledge in atmospheric science
Climate History and Paleoclimatology
Two courses are offered in autumn semester at University of Berne. ETH courses are only offered in FS.
Hydrology and Water Cycle
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4023-00LGroundwaterW4 credits3GX.‑Z. Kong, A. Ebigbo
AbstractThe course provides an introduction into quantitative analysis of groundwater flow and solute transport. It is focussed on understanding, formulating, and solving groundwater flow and solute transport problems.
Objectivea) Students understand the basic concepts of groundwater flow and solute transport processes, and boundary conditions.

b) Students are able to formulate simple, practical groundwater flow and solute transport problems.

c) Students are able to understand and apply simple analytical and/or numerical solutions to fluid flow and solute transport problems.
Content1. Introduction to groundwater problems. Concepts to quantify properties of aquifers.

2. Flow equation. The generalised Darcy law.

3. The water balance equation.

4. Boundary conditions. Formulation of flow problems.

5. Analytical solutions to flow problems

6. Finitie difference scheme solution for simple flow problems.

7. Numerical solution using finitie difference scheme.

8. Concepts of transport modelling. Mass balance equation for contaminants.

9. Boundary conditons. Formulation of contaminant transport problems in groundwater.

10. Analytical solutions to transport problems.

11. Flow in fractures and basic concepts of poroelasticity.

12. Introduction to two-phase flow (vadose zone, NAPLs).
Lecture notesHandouts of slides.
LiteratureBear J., Hydraulics of Groundwater, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1979

Domenico P.A., and F.W. Schwartz, Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology, J. Wilson & Sons, New York, 1990

Chiang und Kinzelbach, 3-D Groundwater Modeling with PMWIN. Springer, 2001.

Kruseman G.P., de Ridder N.A., Analysis and evaluation of pumping test data. Wageningen International Institute for Land Reclamation and Improvement, 1991.

de Marsily G., Quantitative Hydrogeology, Academic Press, 1986
102-0287-00LFluvial Systems Information W3 credits2GP. Molnar
AbstractThe course presents a view of the processes acting on and shaping the landscape and the fluvial landforms that result. The fluvial system is viewed in terms of the production and transport of sediment on hillslopes, the structure of the river network and channel morphology, fluvial processes in the river, riparian zone and floodplain, and basics of catchment and river management.
ObjectiveThe course has two fundamental aims: (1) it aims to provide environmental engineers with the physical process basis of fluvial system change, using the right language and terminology to describe landforms; and (2) it aims to provide quantitative skills in making simple and more complex predictions of change and the data and models required.
ContentThe course consists of three sections: (1) Introduction to fluvial forms and processes and geomorphic concepts of landscape change, including climatic and human activities acting on the system. (2) The processes of sediment production, upland sheet-rill-gully erosion, basin sediment yield, rainfall-triggered landsliding, sediment budgets, and the modelling of the individual processes involved. (3) Processes in the river, floodplain and riparian zone, including river network topology, channel geometry, aquatic habitat, role of riparian vegetation, including basics of fluvial system management. The main focus of the course is hydrological and the scales of interest are field and catchment scales.
Lecture notesThere is no script.
LiteratureThe course materials consist of a series of 13 lecture presentations and notes to each lecture. The lectures were developed from textbooks, professional papers, and ongoing research activities of the instructor. All material is on the course webpage.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Hydrology 1 and Hydrology 2 (or contact instructor).
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