Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2017

Computer Science Master Information
Interfocus Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
263-0008-00LComputational Intelligence LabO6 credits2V + 2U + 1AT. Hofmann
AbstractThis laboratory course teaches fundamental concepts in computational science and machine learning with a special emphasis on matrix factorization and representation learning. The class covers techniques like dimension reduction, data clustering, sparse coding, and deep learning as well as a wide spectrum of related use cases and applications.
ObjectiveStudents acquire fundamental theoretical concepts and methodologies from machine learning and how to apply these techniques to build intelligent systems that solve real-world problems. They learn to successfully develop solutions to application problems by following the key steps of modeling, algorithm design, implementation and experimental validation.

This lab course has a strong focus on practical assignments. Students work in groups of two to three people, to develop solutions to three application problems: 1. Collaborative filtering and recommender systems, 2. Text sentiment classification, and 3. Road segmentation in aerial imagery.

For each of these problems, students submit their solutions to an online evaluation and ranking system, and get feedback in terms of numerical accuracy and computational speed. In the final part of the course, students combine and extend one of their previous promising solutions, and write up their findings in an extended abstract in the style of a conference paper.

(Disclaimer: The offered projects may be subject to change from year to year.)
Contentsee course description
Focus Courses
Focus Courses in Computational Science
Focus Core Courses Computational Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
263-2300-00LHow To Write Fast Numerical Code Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 84.

Prerequisite: Master student, solid C programming skills.
W6 credits3V + 2UM. Püschel
AbstractThis course introduces the student to the foundations and state-of-the-art techniques in developing high performance software for numerical functionality such as linear algebra and others. The focus is on optimizing for the memory hierarchy and for special instruction sets. Finally, the course will introduce the recent field of automatic performance tuning.
ObjectiveSoftware performance (i.e., runtime) arises through the interaction of algorithm, its implementation, and the microarchitecture the program is run on. The first goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of this interaction, and hence software performance, focusing on numerical or mathematical functionality. The second goal is to teach a general systematic strategy how to use this knowledge to write fast software for numerical problems. This strategy will be trained in a few homeworks and semester-long group projects.
ContentThe fast evolution and increasing complexity of computing platforms pose a major challenge for developers of high performance software for engineering, science, and consumer applications: it becomes increasingly harder to harness the available computing power. Straightforward implementations may lose as much as one or two orders of magnitude in performance. On the other hand, creating optimal implementations requires the developer to have an understanding of algorithms, capabilities and limitations of compilers, and the target platform's architecture and microarchitecture.

This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to the foundations and state-of-the-art techniques in high performance software development using important functionality such as linear algebra functionality, transforms, filters, and others as examples. The course will explain how to optimize for the memory hierarchy, take advantage of special instruction sets, and, if time permits, how to write multithreaded code for multicore platforms. Much of the material is based on state-of-the-art research.

Further, a general strategy for performance analysis and optimization is introduced that the students will apply in group projects that accompany the course. Finally, the course will introduce the students to the recent field of automatic performance tuning.
Focus Elective Courses Computational Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-0526-00LStatistical Learning Theory Information W6 credits2V + 3PJ. M. Buhmann
AbstractThe course covers advanced methods of statistical learning :
Statistical learning theory;variational methods and optimization, e.g., maximum entropy techniques, information bottleneck, deterministic and simulated annealing; clustering for vectorial, histogram and relational data; model selection; graphical models.
ObjectiveThe course surveys recent methods of statistical learning. The fundamentals of machine learning as presented in the course "Introduction to Machine Learning" are expanded and in particular, the theory of statistical learning is discussed.
Content# Theory of estimators: How can we measure the quality of a statistical estimator? We already discussed bias and variance of estimators very briefly, but the interesting part is yet to come.

# Variational methods and optimization: We consider optimization approaches for problems where the optimizer is a probability distribution. Concepts we will discuss in this context include:

* Maximum Entropy
* Information Bottleneck
* Deterministic Annealing

# Clustering: The problem of sorting data into groups without using training samples. This requires a definition of ``similarity'' between data points and adequate optimization procedures.

# Model selection: We have already discussed how to fit a model to a data set in ML I, which usually involved adjusting model parameters for a given type of model. Model selection refers to the question of how complex the chosen model should be. As we already know, simple and complex models both have advantages and drawbacks alike.

# Statistical physics models: approaches for large systems approximate optimization, which originate in the statistical physics (free energy minimization applied to spin glasses and other models); sampling methods based on these models
Lecture notesA draft of a script will be provided;
transparencies of the lectures will be made available.
LiteratureHastie, Tibshirani, Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning, Springer, 2001.

L. Devroye, L. Gyorfi, and G. Lugosi: A probabilistic theory of pattern recognition. Springer, New York, 1996
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements:

knowledge of the Machine Learning course
basic knowledge of statistics, interest in statistical methods.

It is recommended that Introduction to Machine Learning (ML I) is taken first; but with a little extra effort Statistical Learning Theory can be followed without the introductory course.
Seminar Computational Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-5251-00LComputational ScienceW2 credits2SP. Arbenz, P. Chatzidoukas
AbstractClass participants study and make a 40 minute presentation (in English) on fundamental papers of Computational Science. A preliminary discussion of the talk (structure, content, methodology) with the responsible professor is required. The talk has to be given in a way that the other seminar participants can understand it and learn from it. Participation throughout the semester is mandatory.
ObjectiveStudying and presenting fundamental works of Computational Science. Learning how to make a scientific presentation.
ContentClass participants study and make a 40 minute presentation (in English) on fundamental papers of Computational Science. A preliminary discussion of the talk (structure, content, methodology) with the responsible professor is required. The talk has to be given in a way that the other seminar participants can understand it and learn from it. Participation throughout the semester is mandatory.
Lecture notesnone
LiteraturePapers will be distributed in the first seminar in the first week of the semester
252-5704-00LAdvanced Methods in Computer Graphics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.
W2 credits2SM. Gross, O. Sorkine Hornung
AbstractThis seminar covers advanced topics in computer graphics with a focus on the latest research results. Topics include modeling, rendering, visualization,
animation, physical simulation, computational photography, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal is to obtain an in-depth understanding of actual problems and
research topics in the field of computer graphics as well as improve
presentation and critical analysis skills.
Focus Courses in Distributed Systems
Focus Core Courses Distributed Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AR. Wattenhofer, M. Ghaffari
AbstractWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
ObjectiveDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
ContentDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
Lecture notesAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteratureLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
Focus Elective Courses Distributed Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-0312-00LUbiquitous Computing Information W3 credits2VF. Mattern, S. Mayer
AbstractUbiquitous computing integrates tiny wirelessly connected computers and sensors into the environment and everyday objects. Main topics: The vision of ubiquitous computing, trends in technology, smart cards, RFID, Personal Area Networks (Bluetooth), sensor networks, location awareness, privacy and security, application areas, economic and social impact.
ObjectiveThe vision of ubiquitous computing, trends in technology, smart cards, RFID, Personal Area Networks (Bluetooth), sensor networks, location awareness, privacy and security, application areas, economic and social impact.
Lecture notesCopies of slides will be made available
LiteratureWill be provided in the lecture. To put you in the mood:
Mark Weiser: The Computer for the 21st Century. Scientific American, September 1991, pp. 94-104
252-0807-00LInformation Systems Laboratory Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.

In the Master Programme max. 10 credits can be accounted by Labs on top of the Interfocus Courses. Additional Labs will be listed on the Addendum.
W10 credits9PM. Norrie
AbstractThe purpose of this laboratory course is to practically explore modern techniques to build large-scale distributed information systems. Participants will work in groups of three or more students, and develop projects in several phases.
ObjectiveThe students will gain experience of working with technologies used in the design and development of information systems.
ContentFirst week: Kick-off meeting and project assignment
Second week: Meeting with the project supervisor to discuss the goals and scope of the project.
During the semester: Individual group work. Each team member should contribute to the project roughly about 10h/week, excluding any necessary reading or self-studying (e.g. the time spent to learn a new technology). In addition, it is expected that each team can meet with their supervisor on a regular basis.
End of semester: Final presentation.
252-0817-00LDistributed Systems Laboratory
In the Master Programme max. 10 credits can be accounted by Labs
on top of the Interfocus Courses. Additional Labs will be listed on the Addendum.
W10 credits9PG. Alonso, F. Mattern, T. Roscoe, A. Singla, R. Wattenhofer, C. Zhang
AbstractThis course involves the participation in a substantial development and/or evaluation project involving distributed systems technology. There are projects available in a wide range of areas: from web services to ubiquitous computing including as well wireless networks, ad-hoc networks, and distributed application on mobile phones.
ObjectiveStudents acquire practical knowledge about technologies from the area of distributed systems.
ContentThis course involves the participation in a substantial development and/or evaluation project involving distributed systems technology. There are projects available in a wide range of areas: from web services to ubiquitous computing including as well wireless networks, ad-hoc networks, and distributed application on mobile phones. The objecte of the project is for the students to gain hands-on-experience with real products and the latest technology in distributed systems. There is no lecture associated to the course.
For information of the course or projects available, please contact Prof. Mattern, Prof. Wattenhofer, Prof. Roscoe or Prof. G. Alonso.
263-3501-00LAdvanced Computer Networks Information W5 credits2V + 2UA. Singla, P. M. Stüdi
AbstractThis course covers a set of advanced topics in computer networks. The focus is on principles, architectures, and protocols used in modern networked systems, such as the Internet and data center networks.
ObjectiveThe goals of the course are to build on basic undergraduate-level networking, and provide an understanding of the tradeoffs and existing technology in the design of large, complex networked systems, together with concrete experience of the challenges through a series of lab exercises.
ContentThe focus of the course is on principles, architectures, and protocols used in modern networked systems. Topics include data center network topologies, software defined networking, network function virtualization, flow control and congestion control in data centers, end-point optimizations, and server virtualization.
263-3700-00LUser Interface Engineering Information W4 credits2V + 1UO. Hilliges, F. Pece
AbstractAn in-depth introduction to the core concepts of intelligent user-interfaces. The course primarily deals with machine analysis of human non-verbal behavior and its applications to human-computer, human-robot, and computer-mediated human-human interaction. Methods involve machine learning, deep learning and model based optimization.
ObjectiveStudents will learn about fundamental aspects of modern intelligent user interfaces. After completing the course students will have acquired theoretical and practical knowledge about the most important problems in machine understanding of human behavior and how to leverage such understanding in the design of intelligent user-facing technologies.

The core competency acquired through this course is a solid foundation in machine learning and deep-learning algorithms to process and interpret human input into computing systems. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the problem of recognizing people in images, detecting and describing body parts, inferring their spatial configuration, performing action/gesture recognition from still images or image sequences, also considering multi-modal data, among others. Furthermore, students will be able to leverage models of human behavior in optimization based (algorithmic) design of user interfaces.
ContentThe course covers theoretical and practical aspects of state-of-the-art algorithms that are foundational for intelligent user interfaces. A particular area of interest are machine-learning based algorithms, in particular deep-learning techniques, for semantic interpretation and machine analysis of human activity, including gestures and multi-modal interaction amongst others. 

The course covers the following main areas:
I) Machine-learning algorithms for input recognition (gestures, speech, etc.)
II) Deep-learning models for the analysis of time-series data (temporal sequences of motion)
III) Model-based optimization of user interfaces

Specific topics include: 
* Data-driven algorithms for user input recognition:
+ SVMs for classification and regression
+ Randomized Decision Forests for gesture recognition and pose estimation
+ Markov chains and HMMs for gesture and speech recognition
* Deep Learning techniques user input recognition:
+ Convolutional Neural Networks
+ Recurrent Neural Networks
* Applications of the above in HCI research
Lecture notesSlides and other materials will be available online. Lecture slides on a particular topic will typically not be made available prior the completion of that lecture.
LiteratureA detailed reading list will be made available on the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: proficiency in a programming language such as C, programming methodology, problem analysis, program structure, etc. Normally met through an introductory course in programming in C, C++, Java. All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as TensorFlow (via Keras) and scikit-learn. We will provide introductions to TensorFlow and other libraries that are needed but will not provide introductions to basic programming or Python.

The following courses are strongly recommended as prerequisite:
* "Machine Learning"
* "Visual Computing" or "Computer Vision"
* "Human Computer Interaction"


The course will be assessed by a final examination in English. No course materials or electronic devices can be used during the examination. Note that the examination will be based on the contents of the lectures, the associated reading materials and the exercises.
Seminar in Distributed Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
263-3830-00LSoftware Defined Networking: The Data Centre Perspective Information W2 credits2ST. Roscoe
AbstractSoftware Defined Networks (SDN) is a change supported not only by research but also industry and redifens how traditional network management and configuration is been done.
ObjectiveThrough review and discussion of literature on an exciting new trend in networking, the students get the opportunity to get familiar with one of the most promising new developments in data centre connectivity, while at the same time they can develop soft skills related to the evaluation and presentation of professional content.
ContentSoftware Defined Networks (SDN) is a change supported not only by research but also industry and redifens how traditional network management and configuration is been done. Although much has been already investigated and there are already functional SDN-enabled switches there are many open questions ahead of the adoption of SDN inside and outside the data centre (traditional or cloud-based). With a series of seminars we will reflect on the challenges, adoption strategies and future trends of SDN to create an understanding how SDN is affecting the network operators' industry.
LiteratureThe seminar is based on recent publications by academia and industry. Links to the publications are placed on the Seminar page and can be downloaded from any location with access to the ETH campus network.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar bases on active and interactive participation of the students.
263-3840-00LHardware Architectures for Machine Learning Information W2 credits2SG. Alonso, T. Hoefler, O. Mutlu, C. Zhang
AbstractThe seminar covers recent results in the increasingly important field of hardware acceleration for data science and machine learning, both in dedicated machines or in data centers.
ObjectiveThe seminar aims at students interested in the system aspects of machine learning, who are willing to bridge the gap across traditional disciplines: machine learning, databases, systems, and computer architecture.
ContentThe seminar is intended to cover recent results in the increasingly important field of hardware acceleration for data science and machine learning, both in dedicated machines or in data centers.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar should be of special interest to students intending to complete a master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation in related topics.
227-0126-00LAdvanced Topics in Networked Embedded Systems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
W2 credits1SL. Thiele, J. Beutel, Z. Zhou
AbstractThe seminar will cover advanced topics in networked embedded systems. A particular focus are cyber-physical systems and sensor networks in various application domains.
ObjectiveThe goal is to get a deeper understanding on leading edge technologies in the discipline, on classes of applications, and on current as well as future research directions.
ContentThe seminar enables Master students, PhDs and Postdocs to learn about latest breakthroughs in wireless sensor networks, networked embedded systems and devices, and energy-harvesting in several application domains, including environmental monitoring, tracking, smart buildings and control. Participants are requested to actively participate in the organization and preparation of the seminar.
227-0559-00LSeminar in Distributed Computing Information W2 credits2SR. Wattenhofer
AbstractIn this seminar participating students present and discuss recent research papers in the area of distributed computing. The seminar consists of algorithmic as well as systems papers in distributed computing theory, peer-to-peer computing, ad hoc and sensor networking, or multi-core computing.
ObjectiveIn the last two decades, we have experienced an unprecedented growth in the area of distributed systems and networks; distributed computing now encompasses many of the activities occurring in today's computer and communications world. This course introduces the basics of distributed computing, highlighting common themes and techniques. We study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.

In this seminar, students present the latest work in this domain.

Seminar language: English
ContentDifferent each year. For details see: Link
Lecture notesSlides of presentations will be made available.
LiteraturePapers.
The actual paper selection can be found on Link.
851-0740-00LInternet Architecture & Policy Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20
W3 credits2SS. Bechtold, T. Roscoe
AbstractThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet, with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution.
ObjectiveThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet (broadly defined), with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network (packet switching, global addressing, the end-to-end argument, etc.) and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution (security properties, censorship and censorship resistance, "net neutrality", etc.). No prior knowledge of networking technologies is required; conversely the course will focus only on those features of the Internet design which have strong political and legal implications (and vice versa). The course consists of two parts: lectures and seminars in one part provide an introduction and discussion of the technical, legal, and political aspects of the Internet design. The other part consists of a specific case study of some aspect of the Internet by individual students.
252-3600-02LUbiquitous Computing Seminar Information
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2SF. Mattern, O. Hilliges
AbstractSeminar on various topics from the broader areas of Pervasive Computing, Ubiquitous Computing, Human Computer Interaction, and Distributed Systems.
ObjectiveLearn about various current topics from the broader areas of Pervasive Computing, Ubiquitous Computing, Human Computer Interaction, and Distributed Systems.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere will be an orientation event several weeks before the start of the semester (possibly at the end of the preceding semester) where also first topics will be assigned to students. Please check Link for further information.
Focus Courses in Information Security
Focus Core Courses Information Security
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-0407-00LCryptography Foundations Information
Does not take place this semester.
W7 credits3V + 2U + 1AU. Maurer
AbstractFundamentals and applications of cryptography. Cryptography as a mathematical discipline: reductions, constructive cryptography paradigm, security proofs. The discussed primitives include cryptographic functions, pseudo-randomness, symmetric encryption and authentication, public-key encryption, key agreement, and digital signature schemes. Selected cryptanalytic techniques.
ObjectiveThe goals are:
(1) understand the basic theoretical concepts and scientific thinking in cryptography;
(2) understand and apply some core cryptographic techniques and security proof methods;
(3) be prepared and motivated to access the scientific literature and attend specialized courses in cryptography.
ContentSee course description.
Lecture notesyes.
Prerequisites / NoticeFamiliarity with the basic cryptographic concepts as treated for
example in the course "Information Security" is required but can
in principle also be acquired in parallel to attending the course.
Focus Elective Courses Information Security
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-0408-00LCryptographic Protocols Information W5 credits2V + 2UM. Hirt
AbstractThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
ObjectiveIndroduction to a very active research area with many gems and paradoxical
results. Spark interest in fundamental problems.
ContentThe course presents a selection of hot research topics in cryptography. The choice of topics varies and may include provable security, interactive proofs, zero-knowledge protocols, secret sharing, secure multi-party computation, e-voting, etc.
Lecture notesthe lecture notes are in German, but they are not required as the entire
course material is documented also in other course material (in english).
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic understanding of fundamental cryptographic concepts
(as taught for example in the course Information Security or
in the course Cryptography) is useful, but not required.
263-4600-00LFormal Methods for Information Security Information W4 credits2V + 1UR. Sasse, C. Sprenger
AbstractThe course focuses on formal methods for the modelling and analysis of security protocols for critical systems, ranging from authentication protocols for network security to electronic voting protocols and online banking.
ObjectiveThe students will learn the key ideas and theoretical foundations of formal modelling and analysis of security protocols. The students will complement their theoretical knowledge by solving practical exercises, completing a small project, and using state-of-the-art tools.
ContentThe course treats formal methods for the modelling and analysis of security protocols. Cryptographic protocols (such as SSL/TLS, SSH, Kerberos, SAML single-sign on, and IPSec) form the basis for secure communication and business processes. Numerous attacks on published protocols show that the design of cryptographic protocols is extremely error-prone. A rigorous analysis of these protocols is therefore indispensable, and manual analysis is insufficient. The lectures cover the theoretical basis for the (tool-supported) formal modeling and analysis of such protocols. Specifically, we discuss their operational semantics, the formalization of security properties, and techniques and algorithms for their verification.

In addition to the classical security properties for confidentiality and authentication, we will study strong secrecy, privacy, and fairness properties. We will discuss electronic voting protocols, and RFID protocols (a staple of the Internet of Things), where these properties are central. The accompanying tutorials provide an opportunity to apply the theory and tools to concrete protocols.
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