Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2022

Environmental Engineering Master Information
Majors
Major Urban Water Management
Compulsory Moudules
Ecological Systems Design
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0348-00LProspective Environmental Assessments
Prerequisite for this lecture is basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools, such as material flow analysis, risk assessment and life cycle assessment.
Students without previous knowledge in these areas need to read according textbooks prior to or at the beginning of the lecture.
O3 credits2GS. Hellweg, N. Heeren, A. Spörri
AbstractThis lecture deals with prospective assessments of emerging technologies as well as with the assessment of long-term environmental impact caused by today's activities.
Objective- Understanding prospective environmental assessments, including scenario analysis techniques, prospective emission models, dynamic MFA and LCA.
- Ability to properly plan and conduct prospective environmental assessment studies, for example on emerging technologies or on technical processes that cause long-term environmental impacts.
- Being aware of the uncertainties involved in prospective studies.
- Getting to know measures to prevent long-term emissions or impact in case studies
- Knowing the arguments in favor and against a temporally differentiated weighting of environmental impacts (discounting)
Content- Scenario analysis
- Dynamic material flow analysis
- Temporal differentiation in LCA
- Systems dynamics tools
- Assessment of future and present environmental impact
- Case studies
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be made available on Moodle.
Process Engineering in Urban Water Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0217-01LProcess Engineering Ib Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: 102-0217-00L Process Engineering Ia (given in HS).
O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to build on the fundamental understanding of biological processes and wastewater treatment applications that were studied in Process Engineering Ia. Case studies that are jointly discussed in class and student led projects allow you to advance the understanding and critical analysis of biological treatment processes.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate existing wastewater treatment plants and future designs using basic process understanding, mathematical modeling tools, and knowledge obtained from the current literature. The students shall be capable to apply and recognize the limits of the kinetic models which have been developed to simulate these systems.
ContentAdvanced modeling of activated sludge systems
Nitrification, denitrification, and biological P elimination
Enrichment in mixed culture systems using, e.g., selectors
Biofilm kinetics and application to full scale plants
Critical review of treatment processes
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: 102-0217-00 Process Engineering Ia (held in HS).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
102-0218-00LProcess Engineering II (Physical-Chemical Processes) Information O6 credits4GK. M. Udert
AbstractDescription and design of physical, chemical and biological processes and process combinations in drinking water and wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of critical water quality parameters in water resources and wastewater and process engineering knowledge for the removal of drinking water and environmental hazards. The aims of the lecture are basic understanding of mainly physico-chemical water treatment processes, design and modeling tools of single processes and process combinations.
ContentThe following processes and process combination will be discussed in detail:
Gas transfer
Particle characterization
Sedimentation
Flocculation
Filtration
Membrane processes
Precipitation processes
Chemical oxidation and disinfection
Ion exchange
Activated carbon adsorption
Process combinations wastewater
Process combinations potable water
LiteratureM&E: Tchobanoglous, G., Stensel, H.D., Tsuchihashi, R. and Burton, F.L., 2013. Wastewater engineering: treatment and resource recovery. 5th edition. Volume 1 & 2. New York, McGraw-Hill.
MWH: Crittenden, J.C., Trussel, R.R., Hand, D.W., Howe, K., Tchobanoglous, G., 2012. MWH's water treatment principles and design, 3rd edition. ed. Wiley, Hoboken, N.J.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-condition: Lecture Process Engineering Ia
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Systems Analysis in Urban Water Management
Offered in the autumn semester.
Water Infrastructure Planning and Stormwater Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0248-00LInfrastructure Systems in Urban Water Management Information
Prerequisites: 102-0214-02L Urban Water Management I and 102-0215-00L Urban Water Management II.
O3 credits2GJ. P. Leitão Correia , M. Maurer, A. Scheidegger
AbstractAn increasing demand for infrastructure management skills can be observed in the environmental engineering practice. This course gives an introductory overview of infrastructure management skills needed for urban water infrastructures, with a specific focus on performance, risk and engineering economics analyses.
ObjectiveAfter successfully finishing the course, the participants will have the following skills and knowledge:
- Know the key principles of infrastructure management
- Know the basics of performance and risk assessment
- Can perform basic engineering economic analysis
- Know how to quantify the future rehabilitation needs
ContentThe nationwide coverage of water distribution and wastewater treatment is one of the major public works achievements in Switzerland and other countries. Annually and per person, 135,000 L of drinking water is produced and distributed and over 535,000 L of stormwater and wastewater is drained. These impressive services are done with a pipe network with a length of almost 200,000 km and a total replacement value of 30,000 CHF per capita.

Water services in Switzerland are moving from a phase of new constructions into one of maintenance and optimization. The aim today must be to ensure that existing infrastructure is professionally maintained, to reduce costs, and to ensure the implementation of modern, improved technologies and approaches. These challenging tasks call for sound expertise and professional management.

This course gives an introduction into basic principles of water infrastructure management. The focus is primarily on Switzerland, but most methods and conclusions are valid for many other countries.
Lecture notesThe script 'Engineering Economics for Public Water Utilities' can be downloaded from the moodle course page.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
Major Environmental Technologies
Compulsory Moudules
Air Quality Control
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0368-00LAir Quality and Aerosol Mechanics Information
Prerequisite: Strongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar lectures
O3 credits2GJ. Wang
AbstractAir quality has direct effect on public health and life quality. Both gaseous and particulate pollutants affect the air quality. Aerosols, solid or liquid particles suspended in the air, play important roles in atmospheric sciences and air pollution. This course covers aerosol mechanical, optical and electrical properties, and measurement and control technologies.
ObjectiveThe students understand the effects of airborne particulate and gaseous pollutants on air quality. The students gain fundamental knowledge on mechanics governing mechanical, optical and electrical properties of aerosols. Aerosol behaviors including diffusion, coagulation, condensation, charging and evaporation are discussed. The students understand basic principles to generate, sample, measure and control airborne particles. The students learn state-of-the-art instruments for air-borne particles from micrometer to nanometer size range.
ContentProperties of Gases.
Uniform Particle Motion.
Particle Size Statistics.
Straight-Line Acceleration and Curvilinear Particle Motion.
Brownian Motion and Diffusion.
Filtration.
Aerosol Deposition in Respiratory System
Sampling and Measurement of Concentration.
Coagulation.
Condensation and Evaporation.
Electrical Properties.
Optical Properties.
Microscopic Measurement of Particle Size.
Production of Test Aerosols.
Lecture notesThe following text book is strongly recommended

Hinds, W.C. Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles, John Wiley & Sons, 2nd Edition - February 1999.
LiteratureHinds, W.C. Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles, John Wiley & Sons, 2nd Edition - February 1999.

Friedlander, S.K. Smoke, Dust, and Haze: Fundamentals of Aerosol Dynamics, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, March 2000.

Seinfeld, J.H. and Pandis, S.N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, from Air Pollution to Climate Change, 2nd edition, 2006.

Journal of Aerosol Science
Aerosol Science and Technology
Environmental Science and Technology
Atmospheric Environment
Environmental Health Perspectives
Science of the Total Environment
Journal of Nanoparticle Research
Prerequisites / Noticestrongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
102-0347-00LAir Quality and Health Impact Information O3 credits2GH. W. Schleibinger, J. Wang, M. Spillmann
AbstractThe air quality of both indoor and outdoor environments impacts the human health. Air pollution has been correlated to excess mortality and led to numerous air quality standards. This lecture covers indoor air pollutants, design of building air handling system, fundamentals of human respiratory system, toxicity and health impact of air pollutants, and personal protection.
ObjectiveThe students learn to access the volatile emission spectrum from building material; detect, evaluate and refurbish mould damage; assess the benefits and potential risks of HVAC systems in terms of indoor air quality. The student will also understand the fundamentals of human respiratory system and causes of adverse health impact; analyze the mechanisms of different toxic effects; and select proper protection equipment against air pollutants.
Content- Indoor air contaminants
- Mould growth, detection, and refurbishment
- Health effects of indoor air contaminants
- Sick building syndrome and building related illness
- Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality
- Design of air handling systems and their impact on IAQ
- Analytical methods for determining IAQ
- Fundamentals of human respiratory system
- Particles induced diseases
- Asbestosis and silicosis
- Health impact caused by ozone, NOx and other pollutants
- Toxicity of (engineered) nanomaterials
- Personal protection equipment
- Air pollutants: particle matter, gases and bioaerosols
LiteratureLists of suitable books and papers will be provided in the lecture.
Prerequisites / Noticestrongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
Process Engineering in Urban Water Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0217-01LProcess Engineering Ib Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: 102-0217-00L Process Engineering Ia (given in HS).
O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to build on the fundamental understanding of biological processes and wastewater treatment applications that were studied in Process Engineering Ia. Case studies that are jointly discussed in class and student led projects allow you to advance the understanding and critical analysis of biological treatment processes.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate existing wastewater treatment plants and future designs using basic process understanding, mathematical modeling tools, and knowledge obtained from the current literature. The students shall be capable to apply and recognize the limits of the kinetic models which have been developed to simulate these systems.
ContentAdvanced modeling of activated sludge systems
Nitrification, denitrification, and biological P elimination
Enrichment in mixed culture systems using, e.g., selectors
Biofilm kinetics and application to full scale plants
Critical review of treatment processes
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: 102-0217-00 Process Engineering Ia (held in HS).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
102-0218-00LProcess Engineering II (Physical-Chemical Processes) Information O6 credits4GK. M. Udert
AbstractDescription and design of physical, chemical and biological processes and process combinations in drinking water and wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of critical water quality parameters in water resources and wastewater and process engineering knowledge for the removal of drinking water and environmental hazards. The aims of the lecture are basic understanding of mainly physico-chemical water treatment processes, design and modeling tools of single processes and process combinations.
ContentThe following processes and process combination will be discussed in detail:
Gas transfer
Particle characterization
Sedimentation
Flocculation
Filtration
Membrane processes
Precipitation processes
Chemical oxidation and disinfection
Ion exchange
Activated carbon adsorption
Process combinations wastewater
Process combinations potable water
LiteratureM&E: Tchobanoglous, G., Stensel, H.D., Tsuchihashi, R. and Burton, F.L., 2013. Wastewater engineering: treatment and resource recovery. 5th edition. Volume 1 & 2. New York, McGraw-Hill.
MWH: Crittenden, J.C., Trussel, R.R., Hand, D.W., Howe, K., Tchobanoglous, G., 2012. MWH's water treatment principles and design, 3rd edition. ed. Wiley, Hoboken, N.J.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-condition: Lecture Process Engineering Ia
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Systems Analysis in Urban Water Management
Offered in the autumn semester.
Waste Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0338-01LWaste Management and Circular EconomyO3 credits2GM. Haupt, R. Warthmann
AbstractUnderstanding the fundamental concepts of advanced waste management and circular economy and, in more detail, on biological processes for waste treatment. Application of concepts on various waste streams, including household and industrial waste streams. Insights into environmental aspects of different waste treatment technologies and waste economy.
ObjectiveThe purpose of this course is to study the fundamental concepts of waste management in Switzerland and globally and learn about new concepts such as Circular Economy. In-depth knowledge on biological processes for waste treatments should be acquired and applied in case studies. Based on this course, you should be able to understand national waste management strategies and related treatment technologies. Treatment plants and valorization concepts for biomass and organic waste should be understood. Furthermore, future designs of waste treatment processes can be evaluated using basic process understanding and knowledge obtained from the current literature.
ContentNational waste management
Waste as a resource
Circular Economy
Assessment tools for waste management strategies
Plastic recycling
Organic Wastes in Switzerland
Anaerobic Digestion & Biogas
Composting process technologies
Organic Waste Hygiene
Product Quality & Use
Waste Economy and environmental aspects
Lecture notesHandouts
Exercises based on literature
LiteratureDeublein, D. and Steinhauser, A. (2011): Biogas from Waste and Renewable Resources: An Introduction. 2nd Edition, Wiley VCH, Weinheim. --> One of the leading books on the subject of anaerobic digestion and biogas, covering all aspects from biochemical and microbial basics to planning and running of biogas plants as well as different technology concepts and biogas upgrade & utilization.

Haupt, M., C. Vadenbo, and S. Hellweg. 2017. Do We Have the Right Performance Indicators for the Circular Economy?: Insight into the Swiss Waste Management System. Journal of Industrial Ecology 21(3): 615–627.

Haupt, M. and S. Hellweg. 2019. Measuring the environmental sustainability of a circular economy. Environmental and Sustainability Indicators
Volumes 1–2, September 2019, 100005.

More information about biowaste treatment in Switzerland (Link) and Europe (www.compostnetwork.info and Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeThere will be complementary exercises going along with some of the lectures, which focus on real life aspects of waste management. Some of the exercises will be solved during lessons whereas others will have to be dealt with as homework.
To pass the course and to achieve credits it is required to pass the examination successfully (Mark 4 or higher). The written examination covers all topics of the course and is based on handouts and on selected literature
Major Resource Management
Compulsory Moudules
Ecological Systems Design
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0348-00LProspective Environmental Assessments
Prerequisite for this lecture is basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools, such as material flow analysis, risk assessment and life cycle assessment.
Students without previous knowledge in these areas need to read according textbooks prior to or at the beginning of the lecture.
O3 credits2GS. Hellweg, N. Heeren, A. Spörri
AbstractThis lecture deals with prospective assessments of emerging technologies as well as with the assessment of long-term environmental impact caused by today's activities.
Objective- Understanding prospective environmental assessments, including scenario analysis techniques, prospective emission models, dynamic MFA and LCA.
- Ability to properly plan and conduct prospective environmental assessment studies, for example on emerging technologies or on technical processes that cause long-term environmental impacts.
- Being aware of the uncertainties involved in prospective studies.
- Getting to know measures to prevent long-term emissions or impact in case studies
- Knowing the arguments in favor and against a temporally differentiated weighting of environmental impacts (discounting)
Content- Scenario analysis
- Dynamic material flow analysis
- Temporal differentiation in LCA
- Systems dynamics tools
- Assessment of future and present environmental impact
- Case studies
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be made available on Moodle.
Groundwater
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0448-00LGroundwater IIO6 credits4GM. Willmann, J. Jimenez-Martinez
AbstractThe course is based on the course 'Groundwater I' and is a prerequisite for a deeper understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems with a strong emphasis on numerical modeling.
ObjectiveThe course should enable students to understand advanced concepts of groundwater flow and transport and to apply groundwater flow and transport modelling.

the student should be able to
a) formulate practical flow and contaminant transport problems.

b) solve steady-state and transient flow and transport problems in 2 and 3 spatial dimensions using numerical codes based on the finite difference method and the finite element methods.

c) solve simple inverse flow problems for parameter estimation given measurements.

d) assess simple multiphase flow problems.

e) assess spatial variability of parameters and use of stochastic techniques in this task.

f) assess simple coupled reactive transport problems.
ContentIntroduction and basic flow and contaminant transport equation.

Numerical solution of the 3D flow equation using the finite difference method.

Numerical solution to the flow equation using the finite element equation

Numerical solution to the transport equation using the finite difference method.

Alternative methods for transport modeling like method of characteristics and the random walk method.

Two-phase flow and Unsaturated flow problems.

Spatial variability of parameters and its geostatistical representation -geostatistics and stochastic modelling.

Reactive transport modelling.
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- Anderson, M. and W. Woessner, Applied Groundwater Modeling, Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 448 p., 2002

- J. Bear and A. Cheng, Modeling Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport, Springer, 2010

- Appelo, C.A.J. and D. Postma, Geochemistry, Groundwater and Pollution, Second Edition, Taylor & Francis, 2005

- Rubin, Y., Applied Stochastic Hydrology, Oxford University Press, 2003

- Chiang und Kinzelbach, 3-D Groundwater Modeling with PMWIN. Springer, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticeEach afternoon will be divided into 2 h of lectures and 2h of exercises. Two thirds of the exercises of the course are organized as a computer workshop to get hands-on experience with groundwater modelling.
701-1240-00LModelling Environmental Pollutants Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
O3 credits2GM. Scheringer, C. Bogdal
AbstractModeling the emissions, transport, partitioning and transformation/degradation of chemical contaminants in air, water and soil.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for students who are interested in the environmental fate and transport of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals and exposure to pollutants in environmental media including air, water, soil and biota. The course focuses on the theory and application of mass-balance models of environmental pollutants. These models are quantitative tools for describing, understanding, and predicting the way pollutants interact with the environment. Important topics include thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions of chemical behavior in environmental systems; mechanisms of chemical degradation in air and other media; novel approaches to modeling chemical fate in a variety of environments, including lakes and rivers, generic regions, and at the global scale, and application of mass balance modeling principles to describe bioaccumulation of pollutants by fish and mammals.
ContentApplication of mass balance principles to chemicals in a system of coupled environmental media. Measurement and estimation of physico-chemical properties that determine the environmental behavior of chemicals. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the behavior of pollutants. Modeling environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and long-range transport potential of chemicals, including a review of available empirical data on various degradation processes. Current issues in multimedia contaminant fate modeling and a case study of the student's choice.
Lecture notesMaterial to support the lectures will be distributed during the course.
LiteratureThere is no required text. The following texts are useful for background reading and additional information.
D. Mackay. Multimedia Environmental Models: The Fugacity Approach, 2nd Ed. 2001. CRC Press.
R. P. Schwarzenbach, P. M. Gschwend, D. M. Imboden. Environmental Organic Chemistry. 2nd Ed. 2003, John Wiley & Sons.
M. Scheringer. Persistence and spatial range of environmental chemicals: New ethical and scientific concepts for risk assessment. 2002. Wiley-VCH.
Waste Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0338-01LWaste Management and Circular EconomyO3 credits2GM. Haupt, R. Warthmann
AbstractUnderstanding the fundamental concepts of advanced waste management and circular economy and, in more detail, on biological processes for waste treatment. Application of concepts on various waste streams, including household and industrial waste streams. Insights into environmental aspects of different waste treatment technologies and waste economy.
ObjectiveThe purpose of this course is to study the fundamental concepts of waste management in Switzerland and globally and learn about new concepts such as Circular Economy. In-depth knowledge on biological processes for waste treatments should be acquired and applied in case studies. Based on this course, you should be able to understand national waste management strategies and related treatment technologies. Treatment plants and valorization concepts for biomass and organic waste should be understood. Furthermore, future designs of waste treatment processes can be evaluated using basic process understanding and knowledge obtained from the current literature.
ContentNational waste management
Waste as a resource
Circular Economy
Assessment tools for waste management strategies
Plastic recycling
Organic Wastes in Switzerland
Anaerobic Digestion & Biogas
Composting process technologies
Organic Waste Hygiene
Product Quality & Use
Waste Economy and environmental aspects
Lecture notesHandouts
Exercises based on literature
LiteratureDeublein, D. and Steinhauser, A. (2011): Biogas from Waste and Renewable Resources: An Introduction. 2nd Edition, Wiley VCH, Weinheim. --> One of the leading books on the subject of anaerobic digestion and biogas, covering all aspects from biochemical and microbial basics to planning and running of biogas plants as well as different technology concepts and biogas upgrade & utilization.

Haupt, M., C. Vadenbo, and S. Hellweg. 2017. Do We Have the Right Performance Indicators for the Circular Economy?: Insight into the Swiss Waste Management System. Journal of Industrial Ecology 21(3): 615–627.

Haupt, M. and S. Hellweg. 2019. Measuring the environmental sustainability of a circular economy. Environmental and Sustainability Indicators
Volumes 1–2, September 2019, 100005.

More information about biowaste treatment in Switzerland (Link) and Europe (www.compostnetwork.info and Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeThere will be complementary exercises going along with some of the lectures, which focus on real life aspects of waste management. Some of the exercises will be solved during lessons whereas others will have to be dealt with as homework.
To pass the course and to achieve credits it is required to pass the examination successfully (Mark 4 or higher). The written examination covers all topics of the course and is based on handouts and on selected literature
Water Resources Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementO3 credits2GA. Castelletti
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
Major Water Resources Management
Compulsory Moudules
Flow and Transport
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0269-00LRiver Morphodynamic Modelling Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2GD. F. Vetsch, D. Vanzo
AbstractThe course teaches the basics of morphodynamic modelling, relevant for civil and environmental engineers. The governing equations for sediment transport in open channels and corresponding numerical solution strategies are introduced. The theoretical parts are discussed by examples.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is twofold. First, the students develop a throughout understanding of the basics of river morphodynamic processes. Second, they get familiar with numerical tools for the simulations in one- and two-dimensions of morphodynamics.
Content- fundamentals of river morphodynamics (Exner equation, bed-load, suspended-load)
- aggradation and degradation processes
- river bars
- non-uniform sediment morphodynamics: the Hirano model
- short and long term response of gravel bed rivers to change in sediment supply
Lecture notesLecture notes, slides shown in the lecture and software can be downloaded
LiteratureCitations will be given in lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises are based on the simulation software BASEMENT (Link), the open-source GIS Qgis (Link) and code examples written in MATLAB and Python. The applications comprise one- and two-dimensional approaches for the modelling of flow and sediment transport.

Requirements: Numerical Hydraulics, River Engineering, MATLAB and/or Python programming skills would be an advantage.
Groundwater
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0448-00LGroundwater IIO6 credits4GM. Willmann, J. Jimenez-Martinez
AbstractThe course is based on the course 'Groundwater I' and is a prerequisite for a deeper understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems with a strong emphasis on numerical modeling.
ObjectiveThe course should enable students to understand advanced concepts of groundwater flow and transport and to apply groundwater flow and transport modelling.

the student should be able to
a) formulate practical flow and contaminant transport problems.

b) solve steady-state and transient flow and transport problems in 2 and 3 spatial dimensions using numerical codes based on the finite difference method and the finite element methods.

c) solve simple inverse flow problems for parameter estimation given measurements.

d) assess simple multiphase flow problems.

e) assess spatial variability of parameters and use of stochastic techniques in this task.

f) assess simple coupled reactive transport problems.
ContentIntroduction and basic flow and contaminant transport equation.

Numerical solution of the 3D flow equation using the finite difference method.

Numerical solution to the flow equation using the finite element equation

Numerical solution to the transport equation using the finite difference method.

Alternative methods for transport modeling like method of characteristics and the random walk method.

Two-phase flow and Unsaturated flow problems.

Spatial variability of parameters and its geostatistical representation -geostatistics and stochastic modelling.

Reactive transport modelling.
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- Anderson, M. and W. Woessner, Applied Groundwater Modeling, Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 448 p., 2002

- J. Bear and A. Cheng, Modeling Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport, Springer, 2010

- Appelo, C.A.J. and D. Postma, Geochemistry, Groundwater and Pollution, Second Edition, Taylor & Francis, 2005

- Rubin, Y., Applied Stochastic Hydrology, Oxford University Press, 2003

- Chiang und Kinzelbach, 3-D Groundwater Modeling with PMWIN. Springer, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticeEach afternoon will be divided into 2 h of lectures and 2h of exercises. Two thirds of the exercises of the course are organized as a computer workshop to get hands-on experience with groundwater modelling.
701-1240-00LModelling Environmental Pollutants Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
O3 credits2GM. Scheringer, C. Bogdal
AbstractModeling the emissions, transport, partitioning and transformation/degradation of chemical contaminants in air, water and soil.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for students who are interested in the environmental fate and transport of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals and exposure to pollutants in environmental media including air, water, soil and biota. The course focuses on the theory and application of mass-balance models of environmental pollutants. These models are quantitative tools for describing, understanding, and predicting the way pollutants interact with the environment. Important topics include thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions of chemical behavior in environmental systems; mechanisms of chemical degradation in air and other media; novel approaches to modeling chemical fate in a variety of environments, including lakes and rivers, generic regions, and at the global scale, and application of mass balance modeling principles to describe bioaccumulation of pollutants by fish and mammals.
ContentApplication of mass balance principles to chemicals in a system of coupled environmental media. Measurement and estimation of physico-chemical properties that determine the environmental behavior of chemicals. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the behavior of pollutants. Modeling environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and long-range transport potential of chemicals, including a review of available empirical data on various degradation processes. Current issues in multimedia contaminant fate modeling and a case study of the student's choice.
Lecture notesMaterial to support the lectures will be distributed during the course.
LiteratureThere is no required text. The following texts are useful for background reading and additional information.
D. Mackay. Multimedia Environmental Models: The Fugacity Approach, 2nd Ed. 2001. CRC Press.
R. P. Schwarzenbach, P. M. Gschwend, D. M. Imboden. Environmental Organic Chemistry. 2nd Ed. 2003, John Wiley & Sons.
M. Scheringer. Persistence and spatial range of environmental chemicals: New ethical and scientific concepts for risk assessment. 2002. Wiley-VCH.
Landscape
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0617-01LMethodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing DataO3 credits2GI. Hajnsek, O. Frey, S. Li
AbstractThe aim of this course is to get an overview of several methodologies/algorithms for analysis of different sensor specific information products. It is focused at students that like to deepen their knowledge and understanding of remote sensing for environmental applications.
ObjectiveThe course is divided into two main parts, starting with a brief introduction to remote sensing imaging (4 lectures), and is followed by an introduction to different methodologies (8 lectures) for the quantitative estimation of bio-/geo-physical parameters. The main idea is to deepen the knowledge in remote sensing tools in order to be able to understand the information products, with respect to quality and accuracy.
ContentEach lecture will be composed of two parts:
Theory: During the first hour, we go trough the main concepts needed to understand the specific algorithm.
Practice: During the second hour, the student will test/develop the actual algorithm over some real datasets using Matlab. The student will not be asked to write all the code from scratch (especially during the first lectures), but we will provide some script with missing parts or pseudo-code. However, in the later lectures the student is supposed to build up some working libraries.
Lecture notesHandouts for each topic will be provided.
LiteratureSuggested readings:
T. M. Lillesand, R.W. Kiefer, J.W. Chipman, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley & Sons Verlag, 2008
J. R. Jensen, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, Prentice Hall Series in Geograpic Information Science, 2000
Water Resources Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementO3 credits2GA. Castelletti
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
Major River and Hydraulic Engineering
Compulsory Moudules
Flow and Transport
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0269-00LRiver Morphodynamic Modelling Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2GD. F. Vetsch, D. Vanzo
AbstractThe course teaches the basics of morphodynamic modelling, relevant for civil and environmental engineers. The governing equations for sediment transport in open channels and corresponding numerical solution strategies are introduced. The theoretical parts are discussed by examples.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is twofold. First, the students develop a throughout understanding of the basics of river morphodynamic processes. Second, they get familiar with numerical tools for the simulations in one- and two-dimensions of morphodynamics.
Content- fundamentals of river morphodynamics (Exner equation, bed-load, suspended-load)
- aggradation and degradation processes
- river bars
- non-uniform sediment morphodynamics: the Hirano model
- short and long term response of gravel bed rivers to change in sediment supply
Lecture notesLecture notes, slides shown in the lecture and software can be downloaded
LiteratureCitations will be given in lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises are based on the simulation software BASEMENT (Link), the open-source GIS Qgis (Link) and code examples written in MATLAB and Python. The applications comprise one- and two-dimensional approaches for the modelling of flow and sediment transport.

Requirements: Numerical Hydraulics, River Engineering, MATLAB and/or Python programming skills would be an advantage.
Hydraulic Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0278-00LFlood ProtectionO3 credits2GR. Boes, J. Eberli
AbstractConcepts and structural measures to prevent or mitigate flood damage, planning methods to implement projects in practice
ObjectiveTo get to know processes leading to flood damage, the different concepts and structural measures allowing to prevent or mitigate flood damage, as well as promising practical planning methods to implement flood protection measures in practice.
ContentExplanation of relevant processes: flooding, aggradation, sedimentations, erosion, debris flows.
Concept of different objectives of protection for various land uses (from rural areas to industrial regions).
General possibilities of flood protection / control.
Land use planning on the basis of hazard zones.
Classical procedures against flood damage with the use of examples such as increase of flow capacity, release structures, flood detention basins, polder.
Property protection as continuative measure.
Maintenance.
Considering of overload case, Emergency procedures.
Damage determination and risk analysis.
Management of residual risk.
Conflict of objective during implementation of procedures.
Situatively adjusted approach.
Case studies (group work).
Field trip.
Lecture notesFlood protection script
LiteratureGuidelines of Swiss federal administration (especially Federal Office for the Environment, FOEN)
River Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0259-00LRiver RevitalizationO3 credits2GI. Schalko, M. Detert, M. Koksch, C. Weber
AbstractChannel formation of alluvial rivers (regime width, planforms) is presented. Fluvial hydraulics and sediment transport theory are summarized. Principles of environmentally friendly hydraulic engineering are derived from river morphology. Special attention is given to the application to flood protection and river revitalization projects.
ObjectiveThe main processes of alluvial river channel formation are presented. Fluvial hydraulics and sediment transport theories are summarized. From these elements basic principles of environmentally friendly hydraulic engineering are derived.
Lecture notesno lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticeRiver Engineering (Lecture 101-0258-00L)
Water Resources Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementO3 credits2GA. Castelletti
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
Project Work (for all Majors)
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0999-00LProject WorkO12 credits26ASupervisors
AbstractWorking during one semester on a task on a topic in the chosen major
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
Elective Modules
For all majors.
EM: Air Quality Control
Elective Module for Majors "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" "Urban Water Management" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0368-00LAir Quality and Aerosol Mechanics Information
Prerequisite: Strongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar lectures
W3 credits2GJ. Wang
AbstractAir quality has direct effect on public health and life quality. Both gaseous and particulate pollutants affect the air quality. Aerosols, solid or liquid particles suspended in the air, play important roles in atmospheric sciences and air pollution. This course covers aerosol mechanical, optical and electrical properties, and measurement and control technologies.
ObjectiveThe students understand the effects of airborne particulate and gaseous pollutants on air quality. The students gain fundamental knowledge on mechanics governing mechanical, optical and electrical properties of aerosols. Aerosol behaviors including diffusion, coagulation, condensation, charging and evaporation are discussed. The students understand basic principles to generate, sample, measure and control airborne particles. The students learn state-of-the-art instruments for air-borne particles from micrometer to nanometer size range.
ContentProperties of Gases.
Uniform Particle Motion.
Particle Size Statistics.
Straight-Line Acceleration and Curvilinear Particle Motion.
Brownian Motion and Diffusion.
Filtration.
Aerosol Deposition in Respiratory System
Sampling and Measurement of Concentration.
Coagulation.
Condensation and Evaporation.
Electrical Properties.
Optical Properties.
Microscopic Measurement of Particle Size.
Production of Test Aerosols.
Lecture notesThe following text book is strongly recommended

Hinds, W.C. Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles, John Wiley & Sons, 2nd Edition - February 1999.
LiteratureHinds, W.C. Aerosol Technology: Properties, Behavior, and Measurement of Airborne Particles, John Wiley & Sons, 2nd Edition - February 1999.

Friedlander, S.K. Smoke, Dust, and Haze: Fundamentals of Aerosol Dynamics, Oxford University Press, 2nd edition, March 2000.

Seinfeld, J.H. and Pandis, S.N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, from Air Pollution to Climate Change, 2nd edition, 2006.

Journal of Aerosol Science
Aerosol Science and Technology
Environmental Science and Technology
Atmospheric Environment
Environmental Health Perspectives
Science of the Total Environment
Journal of Nanoparticle Research
Prerequisites / Noticestrongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
102-0347-00LAir Quality and Health Impact Information W3 credits2GH. W. Schleibinger, J. Wang, M. Spillmann
AbstractThe air quality of both indoor and outdoor environments impacts the human health. Air pollution has been correlated to excess mortality and led to numerous air quality standards. This lecture covers indoor air pollutants, design of building air handling system, fundamentals of human respiratory system, toxicity and health impact of air pollutants, and personal protection.
ObjectiveThe students learn to access the volatile emission spectrum from building material; detect, evaluate and refurbish mould damage; assess the benefits and potential risks of HVAC systems in terms of indoor air quality. The student will also understand the fundamentals of human respiratory system and causes of adverse health impact; analyze the mechanisms of different toxic effects; and select proper protection equipment against air pollutants.
Content- Indoor air contaminants
- Mould growth, detection, and refurbishment
- Health effects of indoor air contaminants
- Sick building syndrome and building related illness
- Guidelines for Indoor Air Quality
- Design of air handling systems and their impact on IAQ
- Analytical methods for determining IAQ
- Fundamentals of human respiratory system
- Particles induced diseases
- Asbestosis and silicosis
- Health impact caused by ozone, NOx and other pollutants
- Toxicity of (engineered) nanomaterials
- Personal protection equipment
- Air pollutants: particle matter, gases and bioaerosols
LiteratureLists of suitable books and papers will be provided in the lecture.
Prerequisites / Noticestrongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
EM: Ecological Systems Design
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0348-00LProspective Environmental Assessments
Prerequisite for this lecture is basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools, such as material flow analysis, risk assessment and life cycle assessment.
Students without previous knowledge in these areas need to read according textbooks prior to or at the beginning of the lecture.
W3 credits2GS. Hellweg, N. Heeren, A. Spörri
AbstractThis lecture deals with prospective assessments of emerging technologies as well as with the assessment of long-term environmental impact caused by today's activities.
Objective- Understanding prospective environmental assessments, including scenario analysis techniques, prospective emission models, dynamic MFA and LCA.
- Ability to properly plan and conduct prospective environmental assessment studies, for example on emerging technologies or on technical processes that cause long-term environmental impacts.
- Being aware of the uncertainties involved in prospective studies.
- Getting to know measures to prevent long-term emissions or impact in case studies
- Knowing the arguments in favor and against a temporally differentiated weighting of environmental impacts (discounting)
Content- Scenario analysis
- Dynamic material flow analysis
- Temporal differentiation in LCA
- Systems dynamics tools
- Assessment of future and present environmental impact
- Case studies
Lecture notesLecture slides and further documents will be made available on Moodle.
EM: Flow and Transport
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management" and "Urban Water Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0269-00LRiver Morphodynamic Modelling Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2GD. F. Vetsch, D. Vanzo
AbstractThe course teaches the basics of morphodynamic modelling, relevant for civil and environmental engineers. The governing equations for sediment transport in open channels and corresponding numerical solution strategies are introduced. The theoretical parts are discussed by examples.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is twofold. First, the students develop a throughout understanding of the basics of river morphodynamic processes. Second, they get familiar with numerical tools for the simulations in one- and two-dimensions of morphodynamics.
Content- fundamentals of river morphodynamics (Exner equation, bed-load, suspended-load)
- aggradation and degradation processes
- river bars
- non-uniform sediment morphodynamics: the Hirano model
- short and long term response of gravel bed rivers to change in sediment supply
Lecture notesLecture notes, slides shown in the lecture and software can be downloaded
LiteratureCitations will be given in lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises are based on the simulation software BASEMENT (Link), the open-source GIS Qgis (Link) and code examples written in MATLAB and Python. The applications comprise one- and two-dimensional approaches for the modelling of flow and sediment transport.

Requirements: Numerical Hydraulics, River Engineering, MATLAB and/or Python programming skills would be an advantage.
EM: Groundwater
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" and "Urban Water Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0448-00LGroundwater IIW6 credits4GM. Willmann, J. Jimenez-Martinez
AbstractThe course is based on the course 'Groundwater I' and is a prerequisite for a deeper understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems with a strong emphasis on numerical modeling.
ObjectiveThe course should enable students to understand advanced concepts of groundwater flow and transport and to apply groundwater flow and transport modelling.

the student should be able to
a) formulate practical flow and contaminant transport problems.

b) solve steady-state and transient flow and transport problems in 2 and 3 spatial dimensions using numerical codes based on the finite difference method and the finite element methods.

c) solve simple inverse flow problems for parameter estimation given measurements.

d) assess simple multiphase flow problems.

e) assess spatial variability of parameters and use of stochastic techniques in this task.

f) assess simple coupled reactive transport problems.
ContentIntroduction and basic flow and contaminant transport equation.

Numerical solution of the 3D flow equation using the finite difference method.

Numerical solution to the flow equation using the finite element equation

Numerical solution to the transport equation using the finite difference method.

Alternative methods for transport modeling like method of characteristics and the random walk method.

Two-phase flow and Unsaturated flow problems.

Spatial variability of parameters and its geostatistical representation -geostatistics and stochastic modelling.

Reactive transport modelling.
Lecture notesHandouts
Literature- Anderson, M. and W. Woessner, Applied Groundwater Modeling, Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 448 p., 2002

- J. Bear and A. Cheng, Modeling Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport, Springer, 2010

- Appelo, C.A.J. and D. Postma, Geochemistry, Groundwater and Pollution, Second Edition, Taylor & Francis, 2005

- Rubin, Y., Applied Stochastic Hydrology, Oxford University Press, 2003

- Chiang und Kinzelbach, 3-D Groundwater Modeling with PMWIN. Springer, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticeEach afternoon will be divided into 2 h of lectures and 2h of exercises. Two thirds of the exercises of the course are organized as a computer workshop to get hands-on experience with groundwater modelling.
701-1240-00LModelling Environmental Pollutants Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
W3 credits2GM. Scheringer, C. Bogdal
AbstractModeling the emissions, transport, partitioning and transformation/degradation of chemical contaminants in air, water and soil.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for students who are interested in the environmental fate and transport of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals and exposure to pollutants in environmental media including air, water, soil and biota. The course focuses on the theory and application of mass-balance models of environmental pollutants. These models are quantitative tools for describing, understanding, and predicting the way pollutants interact with the environment. Important topics include thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions of chemical behavior in environmental systems; mechanisms of chemical degradation in air and other media; novel approaches to modeling chemical fate in a variety of environments, including lakes and rivers, generic regions, and at the global scale, and application of mass balance modeling principles to describe bioaccumulation of pollutants by fish and mammals.
ContentApplication of mass balance principles to chemicals in a system of coupled environmental media. Measurement and estimation of physico-chemical properties that determine the environmental behavior of chemicals. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the behavior of pollutants. Modeling environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and long-range transport potential of chemicals, including a review of available empirical data on various degradation processes. Current issues in multimedia contaminant fate modeling and a case study of the student's choice.
Lecture notesMaterial to support the lectures will be distributed during the course.
LiteratureThere is no required text. The following texts are useful for background reading and additional information.
D. Mackay. Multimedia Environmental Models: The Fugacity Approach, 2nd Ed. 2001. CRC Press.
R. P. Schwarzenbach, P. M. Gschwend, D. M. Imboden. Environmental Organic Chemistry. 2nd Ed. 2003, John Wiley & Sons.
M. Scheringer. Persistence and spatial range of environmental chemicals: New ethical and scientific concepts for risk assessment. 2002. Wiley-VCH.
EM: Hydraulic Engineering
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management", " Urban Water Management" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0278-00LFlood ProtectionW3 credits2GR. Boes, J. Eberli
AbstractConcepts and structural measures to prevent or mitigate flood damage, planning methods to implement projects in practice
ObjectiveTo get to know processes leading to flood damage, the different concepts and structural measures allowing to prevent or mitigate flood damage, as well as promising practical planning methods to implement flood protection measures in practice.
ContentExplanation of relevant processes: flooding, aggradation, sedimentations, erosion, debris flows.
Concept of different objectives of protection for various land uses (from rural areas to industrial regions).
General possibilities of flood protection / control.
Land use planning on the basis of hazard zones.
Classical procedures against flood damage with the use of examples such as increase of flow capacity, release structures, flood detention basins, polder.
Property protection as continuative measure.
Maintenance.
Considering of overload case, Emergency procedures.
Damage determination and risk analysis.
Management of residual risk.
Conflict of objective during implementation of procedures.
Situatively adjusted approach.
Case studies (group work).
Field trip.
Lecture notesFlood protection script
LiteratureGuidelines of Swiss federal administration (especially Federal Office for the Environment, FOEN)
EM: Landscape
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" and "Urban Water Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0617-01LMethodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing DataW3 credits2GI. Hajnsek, O. Frey, S. Li
AbstractThe aim of this course is to get an overview of several methodologies/algorithms for analysis of different sensor specific information products. It is focused at students that like to deepen their knowledge and understanding of remote sensing for environmental applications.
ObjectiveThe course is divided into two main parts, starting with a brief introduction to remote sensing imaging (4 lectures), and is followed by an introduction to different methodologies (8 lectures) for the quantitative estimation of bio-/geo-physical parameters. The main idea is to deepen the knowledge in remote sensing tools in order to be able to understand the information products, with respect to quality and accuracy.
ContentEach lecture will be composed of two parts:
Theory: During the first hour, we go trough the main concepts needed to understand the specific algorithm.
Practice: During the second hour, the student will test/develop the actual algorithm over some real datasets using Matlab. The student will not be asked to write all the code from scratch (especially during the first lectures), but we will provide some script with missing parts or pseudo-code. However, in the later lectures the student is supposed to build up some working libraries.
Lecture notesHandouts for each topic will be provided.
LiteratureSuggested readings:
T. M. Lillesand, R.W. Kiefer, J.W. Chipman, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley & Sons Verlag, 2008
J. R. Jensen, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, Prentice Hall Series in Geograpic Information Science, 2000
EM: Process Engineering in Urban Water Management
Elective Module for Majors "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0217-01LProcess Engineering Ib Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: 102-0217-00L Process Engineering Ia (given in HS).
W3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to build on the fundamental understanding of biological processes and wastewater treatment applications that were studied in Process Engineering Ia. Case studies that are jointly discussed in class and student led projects allow you to advance the understanding and critical analysis of biological treatment processes.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate existing wastewater treatment plants and future designs using basic process understanding, mathematical modeling tools, and knowledge obtained from the current literature. The students shall be capable to apply and recognize the limits of the kinetic models which have been developed to simulate these systems.
ContentAdvanced modeling of activated sludge systems
Nitrification, denitrification, and biological P elimination
Enrichment in mixed culture systems using, e.g., selectors
Biofilm kinetics and application to full scale plants
Critical review of treatment processes
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: 102-0217-00 Process Engineering Ia (held in HS).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationassessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
102-0218-00LProcess Engineering II (Physical-Chemical Processes) Information W6 credits4GK. M. Udert
AbstractDescription and design of physical, chemical and biological processes and process combinations in drinking water and wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of critical water quality parameters in water resources and wastewater and process engineering knowledge for the removal of drinking water and environmental hazards. The aims of the lecture are basic understanding of mainly physico-chemical water treatment processes, design and modeling tools of single processes and process combinations.
ContentThe following processes and process combination will be discussed in detail:
Gas transfer
Particle characterization
Sedimentation
Flocculation
Filtration
Membrane processes
Precipitation processes
Chemical oxidation and disinfection
Ion exchange
Activated carbon adsorption
Process combinations wastewater
Process combinations potable water
LiteratureM&E: Tchobanoglous, G., Stensel, H.D., Tsuchihashi, R. and Burton, F.L., 2013. Wastewater engineering: treatment and resource recovery. 5th edition. Volume 1 & 2. New York, McGraw-Hill.
MWH: Crittenden, J.C., Trussel, R.R., Hand, D.W., Howe, K., Tchobanoglous, G., 2012. MWH's water treatment principles and design, 3rd edition. ed. Wiley, Hoboken, N.J.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-condition: Lecture Process Engineering Ia
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
EM: Remote Sensing and Earth Observation
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering", "Urban Water Management" and "Water Resources Management".

Remark: Students also taking module "Remote Sensing and Earth Observation" as replacement of 102-0617-01L Methodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing Data in module "Landscape" have to chose one out following list:
701-1674-00L Spatial Analysis, Modelling and Optimisation (FS) or
701-1644-00L Mountain Forest Hydrology (HS).
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0617-01LMethodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing DataW3 credits2GI. Hajnsek, O. Frey, S. Li
AbstractThe aim of this course is to get an overview of several methodologies/algorithms for analysis of different sensor specific information products. It is focused at students that like to deepen their knowledge and understanding of remote sensing for environmental applications.
ObjectiveThe course is divided into two main parts, starting with a brief introduction to remote sensing imaging (4 lectures), and is followed by an introduction to different methodologies (8 lectures) for the quantitative estimation of bio-/geo-physical parameters. The main idea is to deepen the knowledge in remote sensing tools in order to be able to understand the information products, with respect to quality and accuracy.
ContentEach lecture will be composed of two parts:
Theory: During the first hour, we go trough the main concepts needed to understand the specific algorithm.
Practice: During the second hour, the student will test/develop the actual algorithm over some real datasets using Matlab. The student will not be asked to write all the code from scratch (especially during the first lectures), but we will provide some script with missing parts or pseudo-code. However, in the later lectures the student is supposed to build up some working libraries.
Lecture notesHandouts for each topic will be provided.
LiteratureSuggested readings:
T. M. Lillesand, R.W. Kiefer, J.W. Chipman, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley & Sons Verlag, 2008
J. R. Jensen, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, Prentice Hall Series in Geograpic Information Science, 2000
EM: River Systems
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management", " Urban Water Management" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0259-00LRiver RevitalizationW3 credits2GI. Schalko, M. Detert, M. Koksch, C. Weber
AbstractChannel formation of alluvial rivers (regime width, planforms) is presented. Fluvial hydraulics and sediment transport theory are summarized. Principles of environmentally friendly hydraulic engineering are derived from river morphology. Special attention is given to the application to flood protection and river revitalization projects.
ObjectiveThe main processes of alluvial river channel formation are presented. Fluvial hydraulics and sediment transport theories are summarized. From these elements basic principles of environmentally friendly hydraulic engineering are derived.
Lecture notesno lecture notes
Prerequisites / NoticeRiver Engineering (Lecture 101-0258-00L)
EM: Soil
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering", "Urban Water Management" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0314-10LSoil Mechanics (for Environmental Engineers) Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for Environmental Engineering MSc.
W3 credits2GI. Anastasopoulos, R. Herzog, A. Marin
AbstractFundamentals of soil mechanics: soil classification, influence of groundwater, stresses and deformations, shear strength of soil, slope stability analysis
ObjectiveFundamentals in soil mechanics and geotechnics will be presented focusing on: soil as a multi-phase hydro-mechanical system, essential parameters for classification and description of soil, influence of water on the soil behaviour, stress-strain response and shear-strength of soil
ContentIntroduction and basic terms; soil classification ; influence of groundwater, water pressure on structures, hydraulic heave (piping), water flow and erosion; stresses, concept of effective stresses, influence of stress history and stress distribution; deformation, stress-strain relationship, 1D consolidation theory (time dependency of deformations); shear-strength, failure criteria and shear-strength parameters; slope stability, infinite slope limit equilibrium methods
Lecture notesExamples
Exercises
LiteratureLang, H.-J.; Huder, J.; Amann, P.; Puzrin, A.M.: Bodenmechanik und Grundbau, Springer-Lehrbuch, 9. Auflage, 2010
Knappett, J.; Craig, R.F.: Craig's Soil Mechanics, CRC Press, 9. Edition, 2019
Prerequisites / NoticeNotice: Laboratory exercises and online quiz (Moodle)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
EM: Systems Analysis in Urban Water Management
Elective Module for Majors "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" and "Water Resources Management".

Offered in the autumn semester.
EM: Waste Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0338-01LWaste Management and Circular EconomyW3 credits2GM. Haupt, R. Warthmann
AbstractUnderstanding the fundamental concepts of advanced waste management and circular economy and, in more detail, on biological processes for waste treatment. Application of concepts on various waste streams, including household and industrial waste streams. Insights into environmental aspects of different waste treatment technologies and waste economy.
ObjectiveThe purpose of this course is to study the fundamental concepts of waste management in Switzerland and globally and learn about new concepts such as Circular Economy. In-depth knowledge on biological processes for waste treatments should be acquired and applied in case studies. Based on this course, you should be able to understand national waste management strategies and related treatment technologies. Treatment plants and valorization concepts for biomass and organic waste should be understood. Furthermore, future designs of waste treatment processes can be evaluated using basic process understanding and knowledge obtained from the current literature.
ContentNational waste management
Waste as a resource
Circular Economy
Assessment tools for waste management strategies
Plastic recycling
Organic Wastes in Switzerland
Anaerobic Digestion & Biogas
Composting process technologies
Organic Waste Hygiene
Product Quality & Use
Waste Economy and environmental aspects
Lecture notesHandouts
Exercises based on literature
LiteratureDeublein, D. and Steinhauser, A. (2011): Biogas from Waste and Renewable Resources: An Introduction. 2nd Edition, Wiley VCH, Weinheim. --> One of the leading books on the subject of anaerobic digestion and biogas, covering all aspects from biochemical and microbial basics to planning and running of biogas plants as well as different technology concepts and biogas upgrade & utilization.

Haupt, M., C. Vadenbo, and S. Hellweg. 2017. Do We Have the Right Performance Indicators for the Circular Economy?: Insight into the Swiss Waste Management System. Journal of Industrial Ecology 21(3): 615–627.

Haupt, M. and S. Hellweg. 2019. Measuring the environmental sustainability of a circular economy. Environmental and Sustainability Indicators
Volumes 1–2, September 2019, 100005.

More information about biowaste treatment in Switzerland (Link) and Europe (www.compostnetwork.info and Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeThere will be complementary exercises going along with some of the lectures, which focus on real life aspects of waste management. Some of the exercises will be solved during lessons whereas others will have to be dealt with as homework.
To pass the course and to achieve credits it is required to pass the examination successfully (Mark 4 or higher). The written examination covers all topics of the course and is based on handouts and on selected literature
EM: Water Infrastructure Planning and Stormwater Management
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", "Resource Management", "River and Hydraulic Engineering" and "Water Resources Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0248-00LInfrastructure Systems in Urban Water Management Information
Prerequisites: 102-0214-02L Urban Water Management I and 102-0215-00L Urban Water Management II.
W3 credits2GJ. P. Leitão Correia , M. Maurer, A. Scheidegger
AbstractAn increasing demand for infrastructure management skills can be observed in the environmental engineering practice. This course gives an introductory overview of infrastructure management skills needed for urban water infrastructures, with a specific focus on performance, risk and engineering economics analyses.
ObjectiveAfter successfully finishing the course, the participants will have the following skills and knowledge:
- Know the key principles of infrastructure management
- Know the basics of performance and risk assessment
- Can perform basic engineering economic analysis
- Know how to quantify the future rehabilitation needs
ContentThe nationwide coverage of water distribution and wastewater treatment is one of the major public works achievements in Switzerland and other countries. Annually and per person, 135,000 L of drinking water is produced and distributed and over 535,000 L of stormwater and wastewater is drained. These impressive services are done with a pipe network with a length of almost 200,000 km and a total replacement value of 30,000 CHF per capita.

Water services in Switzerland are moving from a phase of new constructions into one of maintenance and optimization. The aim today must be to ensure that existing infrastructure is professionally maintained, to reduce costs, and to ensure the implementation of modern, improved technologies and approaches. These challenging tasks call for sound expertise and professional management.

This course gives an introduction into basic principles of water infrastructure management. The focus is primarily on Switzerland, but most methods and conclusions are valid for many other countries.
Lecture notesThe script 'Engineering Economics for Public Water Utilities' can be downloaded from the moodle course page.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
EM: Water Resources Management
Elective Module for Majors "Environmental Technologies", and "Urban Water Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementW3 credits2GA. Castelletti
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
Specialized Computer Laboratory
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0528-01LExperimental and Computer Laboratory (Year Course) Information Restricted registration - show details O10 credits2PD. Braun, A. Costa, M. Giuliani, M. Holzner, J. Jimenez-Martinez, S. Li, M. Maurer, J. Wang, Z. Wang
AbstractIn the Experimental and Computer Laboratory students are introduced to research and good scientific practice. Experiments are conducted in different disciplines of environmental engineering. Data collected during experiments are compared to the corresponding numeric simulations. The results are documented in reports or presentations.
ObjectiveThe student will learn the following skills: basic scientific work, planning and conducting scientific experiments, uncertainty estimations of measurements, applied numerical simulations, modern sensor technology, writing reports.
ContentThe Experimental and Computer Laboratory is building on courses in the corresponding modules. Material from these courses is a prerequisite or co-requisite (as specified below) for participating in the Experimental and Computer Laboratory (MODULE: Project in the Experimental and Computer Laboratory):
- WatInfra: Water Network Management
- UWM: SysUWM + ProcUWM: Operation of Lab-WWTP
- AIR: Air Quality Measurements
- WasteBio: Anaerobic Digestion
- WasteRec: Plastic Recycling
- ESD: Environmental Assessment
- GROUND: Groundwater Field Course Kappelen
- WRM: Modelling Optimal Water Allocation
- FLOW: 1D Open Channel Flow Modelling
- LAND: Landscape Planning and Environmental Systems
- RIVER: Discharge Measurements
- HydEngr: Hydraulic Experiments
- RemSens: Earth Observation and Landscape Planning
- SOIL: Soil and Environmental Measurements Lab
Lecture notesWritten material will be available.
Electives
The entire course programs of ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich are open to the students to individual selection.
Electives Master Programm
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0186-00LCAD for Environmental Engineers Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
W2 credits2GM. Miani
AbstractEinführung in das computergestützte Konstruieren in 2D (3D).
ObjectiveNach Abschluss des Kurses können die Absolventen eine 2D-Konstruktion erstellen (Zonenplan, Siedlungsentwässerung, GEP) und sie kennen das Prinzip des digitalen Geländemoduls. Weiter haben sie ein Einblick in die verschiedenen Planungsabläufen der Bauingenieure und die Zusammenarbeit mit Bauzeichner/Bauingenieur. Die Absolventen können einen Plan lesen und kennen die verschiedenen Planelemente.
ContentBasis 2D
- Grundlegende Befehle wie Linien, Kreise, Bemassung, Beschriftung
- Optionseinstellungen
- Oberflächeneinstellungen
- Bauwerkstruktur
- Layer
- Import

CH-Planungspaket
- Zonenplan erstellen
- Beschriftungsbilder einsetzen
- Objektmanager
- GEP Plan erstellen

Kanalisation Add-On
- Siedlungsentwässerungsplan erstellen
- Plan lesen (Kanalisation)

Digitales Geländemodell
- Aufrag
- Abtrag
- Planvorbereitung (DGM zu Plan)

-Übergreifendes
- Verschiedene Disziplinen (Tief-, Hoch-, konstruktiver Tief- und Kunstbau)
- Plan lesen (verschiedenen Planungselemente
- Spezialschächte und deren Funktionen
- Planungsablauf (von Variantenstudie bis PaW, Detailierungsgrad)
- Interner Planungsablauf (Bauingenieur - Bauzeichner - Bauingenieur)

Je nach Zeit; 3D-Modellieren
- Bool'sche Operatoren
- Modellieren
- Modell als 3D-Makro speichern
- Architekturelemente (Bsp. Rückhaltebecken)
Lecture notesIntroduction into computeradded construction 2D (3D).
102-1248-00LExperimental Microfluidics: A Short Course Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.
W1 credit2GE. Secchi, G. G. Dsouza, S. Stavrakis
AbstractThe course teaches the basics of microfluidic technology and sample a range of applications in microbiology and chemistry, all through hands-on experience and live demos.
ObjectiveFamiliarization with the basics of microfluidics and with some applications of this technology in microbiology and chemistry.
ContentPhysics of fluid transport at small scales, design and fabrication of microfluidic devices, set up of a typical microfluidic experiment, flow visualization, image acquisition and analysis, examples of microfluidics studies of chemistry, optofluidic, microbial growth, motility, chemotaxis and interactions among microbes.
Lecture notesScript and papers of previous problems
LiteratureIntroduction to Microfluidics, Patrick Tabeling, Oxford University Press, 2005
Elctives ETH Zurich
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0010-01LMaster's Thesis
Only students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their master thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor programme;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme.
W30 credits64DSupervisors
AbstractThe Master Programme concludes with the Master Thesis, which has to be done in one of the chosen Majors and has to be completed within 28 weeks. The Master Thesis is supervised by a professor and shall attest the students ability to work independently and to produce scientifically structured work.
ObjectiveTo work independently and to produce a scientifically structured work.
ContentThe topics of the Mastrer Thesis are published by the professors. The Topic can be set also in consultation between the student and the professor.
Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-BAUG
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0203-AALHydraulics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RR. Stocker
AbstractThe course teaches the basics of hydromechanics, relevant for civil and environmental engineers.
ObjectiveFamiliarization with the basics of hydromechanics of steady state flows
ContentProperties of water, hydrostatics, continuity, Euler equation of motion, Navier Stokes euqation, similarity, Bernoulli principle, momentum equation for finite volumes, potential flows, ideal fluids-real fluids, boundary layer, pipe flow, open channel flow, flow in porous media, flow measurements, demonstration experiments in the lecture hall
Lecture notesScript and collection of problems available (in German)
LiteratureBollrich, Technische Hydromechanik 1, Verlag Bauwesen, Berlin
102-0214-AALIntroduction to Urban Water Management Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RE. Morgenroth, M. Maurer
AbstractIntroduction to urban water management (water supply, urban drainage, wastewater treatment, sewage sludge treatment). Introduction to Urban Water Management is a self-study course.
ObjectiveThis course provides an introduction and an overview over the topics of urban water management (water supply, urban drainage, wastewater treatment, sewage sludge treatment). It supports the understanding of the interactions of the relevant technical and natural systems. Simple design models are introduced.
ContentOverview over the field of urban water management.
Introduction into systems analysis.
Characterization of water and water quality.
Requirement of drinking water, production of wastewater and pollutants.
Production and supply of drinking water.
Urban drainage, treatment of combined sewer overflow.
Wastewater treatment, nutrient elimination, sludge handling.
Planning of urban water infrastructure.
Lecture notesFor more information about provided material, have a look at:
Link
LiteratureIn this self-study course the students must work through and understand selected sections from the following book:

Viessman, W., Hammer, M.J. and Perez, E.M. (2009) Water supply and pollution control,
Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

Students must understand and be able to discuss the required reading in a 30 min oral exam. The required reading includes the following:

- Read and know by heart: All chapters in Viessman et al (2009) except those listed below.
- Read and have basic overview but no detailed knowledge: Chapters 11.15 - 11.30, 14.15 - 14.24
- Not part of the required reading: Chapters 2, 3.1 - 3.9, 3.12, 3.13, 3.19, 3.20, 4.5, 4.6, 12.23 - 12.26, 12.31, 12.32, and 12.34.

This required reading and studying should correspond roughly the time invested in the course "Siedlungswasserwirtschaft GZ". Students are welcome to ask the assistants (Link) for help with questions they have regarding the reading.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome students joining the MSc program in Environmental Engineering at ETH Zürich have to take additional courses from our BSc program. The decision of what courses to take is done at the time of admission at ETH.

The course on "Introduction to Urban Water Management" is offered at ETH Zürich only in German. Students who can speak and understand German must take the course (Siedlungswasserwirtschaft GZ) and get a passing grade. For students that do not have sufficient German language skills there is a self-study course and they have to take an oral exam.

This course is required for further in depth courses in urban water management.

Prerequisite: Hydraulics I and Hydrology
102-0324-AALEcological Systems Analysis
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RS. Pfister
AbstractThis course deals with the methodological basics and application of various environmental assessment tools.
ObjectiveAfter attending the lecture, students know environmental assessment tools, such as material flow analysis, risk assessment, and life cycle assessment. They can identify and apply the appropriate tool in a given situation. Also, they are able to critically assess existing studies.
Content- Material flow analysis
- Life cycle assessment
- Risk assessment
- Case studies
LiteratureLiterature to be studied is indicated on
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeSelf-study course.
102-0325-AALWaste Management
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RC. Leitzinger
AbstractIntroduction into the problems of waste handling with the goal to get the ability of seeing and improving the influence of commodities and products with there packaging to the environment - as they are becoming waste. Knowing the different mechanical and chemical processes, which are applicable in the field of waste management.
Objective*To reconstruct the historical development of the waste problems (C2)
*To know the problems of a modern waste management (C4)
*To see and to improve the influence of commodities and products to the environment (C5)
*To recognize waste and his components as raw material and resources and to get the know how for a correct handling (C6)
*To know the different mechanical and chemical processes, which are applicable in the field of waste management (C6)
ContentThis lecture gives a comprehensive overview of the different waste-types and waste handling possibilities:
*Waste composition as a mirror of the human evolution
*Waste definition (formation, amount, energy content, waste composition)
*Several recycling possibilities and processes
*Thermal waste treatment (electricity/district heat as products), including off-gas cleaning and incineration residue handling with regards to the final residue storage in a landfill and the problems which have to be solved there
*Special fields like biological waste handling (composting, fermentation), handling of special wastes and municipal sewage sludge treatment
*Economical aspects
Lecture notesMartin F. Lemann: Waste Management
2nd enhanced English Edition 2008, 450 pages
Publisher: Peter Lang AG, Bern
ISBN 978-3-03911-514-3
Literaturesee bibliographie in the script
Prerequisites / Noticebasic of chemical processes has to be known
102-0455-AALGroundwater I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RJ. Jimenez-Martinez, M. Willmann
AbstractThe course provides a quantitative introduction to groundwater flow and contaminant transport.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the basic concepts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport processes. Formulation and solving of practical problems.
ContentProperties of porous and fractured media, Darcy’s law, flow equation, stream functions, interpretation of pumping tests, transport processes, transport equation, analytical solutions for transport, numerical methods: finite differences method, aquifers remediation, case studies.
LiteratureJ. Bear, Hydraulics of Groundwater, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1979
K. de Ridder, Untersuchung und Anwendung von Pumpversuchen, Verl. R. Müller, Köln, 1970
P.A. Domenico, F.W. Schwartz, Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology, J. Wilson & Sons, New York, 1990
R.A. Freeze, J.A. Cherry, Groundwater, Prentice-Hall, New Jersey, 1979
W. Kinzelbach, R. Rausch, Grundwassermodellierung, Gebrüder Bornträger, Stuttgart, 1995
102-0635-AALAir Pollution Control
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RJ. Wang, B. Buchmann
AbstractThe lecture provides an introduction to the formation of air pollutants by technical processes, the emission of these chemicals into the atmosphere and the impact on air quality. Theoretical description and modeling of these processes, air quality measurement techniques and pollution control techniques are covered.
ObjectiveThe students gain general knowledge of the factors resulting in air pollution and the techniques used for air pollution control. The students can identify major air pollution sources and understand the methods for measurement, data collection and analysis. The students can evaluate possible control methods and equipment, design a control system and estimate the efficiency and cost.
Content- the physical and chemical processes leading to emission of pollutants
- air quality analysis
- the meteorological parameters influencing air pollution dispersion
- deterministic and stochastic models, describing the air pollution dispersion
- measurement concepts to observe ambient air pollution
- removal of gaseous pollutants by absorption and adsorption
- control of NOx and Sox
- fundamentals of particulate control
- design and application of wet scrubbers
LiteratureText book
Air Pollution Control Technology Handbook, Karl B. Schnelle, Jr. and Charles A. Brown, CRC Press LLC, 2001.
Prerequisites / NoticeCollege lectures on basic physics, chemistry and mathematics.
252-0846-AALComputer Science II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RF. Friedrich Wicker, R. Sasse
AbstractThis course provides the foundations of programming and working with data. Computer Science II particularly stresses code efficiency and provides the basis for understanding, design, and analysis of algorithms and data structures. In terms of working with data, foundations required for understanding experimental data and notation and basic concepts for machine learning are covered.
ObjectiveBased on the knowledge covered by the lecture Computer Science I, the primary educational objective of this course is the constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms. After successfully attending the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct a program in Python and to work with multidimensional data using Python libraries. Students particularly understand how an algorithmic problem can be solved with a sufficiently efficient computer program. Secondary educational objectives are formal thinking, the power of abstraction, and appropriate modeling capabilities.
ContentIntroduction of Python: from Java to Python, advanced concepts and built-in data structures in Python; parsing data, operating on data using Numpy and visualization using Matplotlib; linear regression, classification and (k-means) clustering, mathematical tools for the analysis of algorithms (asymptotic function growth, recurrence equations, recurrence trees), classical algorithmic problems (searching, selection and sorting), design paradigms for the development of algorithms (divide-and-conquer and dynamic programming), data structures for different purposes (linked lists, trees, heaps, hash-tables). The relationship and tight coupling between algorithms and data structures is illustrated with graph algorithms (traversals, topological sort, closure, shortest paths).

In general, the concepts provided in the course are motivated and illustrated with practically relevant algorithms and applications.
Exercises are carried out in Code-Expert, an online IDE and exercise management system. Programming language used in this course is Python.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureT. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest, C. Stein, Introduction to Algorithms , 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticePreliminaries: course 252-0845 Computer Science or equivalent knowledge in programming.
529-2001-AALChemistry I and II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

All other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-9 credits19RJ. Cvengros
AbstractGeneral Chemistry I and II: Chemical bond and molecular structure, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, kinetics, acids and bases, electrochemistry
ObjectiveIntroduction to general and inorganic chemistry. Basics of the composition and the change of the material world. Introduction to the thermodynamically controlled physico-chemical processes. Macroscopic phenomena and their explanation through atomic and molecular properties. Using the theories to solve qualitatively and quantitatively chemical and ecologically relevant problems.
Content1. Stoichiometry

2. Atoms and Elements (Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom)

3. Chemical Bonding

4. Thermodynamics

5. Chemical Kinetics

6. Chemical Equilibrium (Acids and Bases, Solubility Equilibria)

7. Electrochemistry
Lecture notesTheodore L. Brown, H. Eugene LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, CHEMISTRY The Central Science, Global Edition, Pearson, 2015.
LiteratureMortimer, Müller CHEMIE (deutsch)
Housecroft and Constable, CHEMISTRY (englisch)
Oxtoby, Gillis, Nachtrieb, MODERN CHEMISTRY (englisch)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
529-2002-AALChemistry II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

All other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RJ. Cvengros, H. Grützmacher
AbstractChemistry II: Redox reactions, chemistry of the elements, introduction to organic chemistry
ObjectiveGeneral base for understanding of inorganic and organic chemistry.
Content1. Redoxreactions

2. Inorganic Chemistry
Rules for nomenclature of inorganic compounds. Systematic description of the groups of elements in the periodical system and the most important compounds of these elements. Formation of compounds as a consequence of the electronoc structure of the elements.

3. Introduction to organic chemistry
Description of the most important classes of compounds and of the functional groups. Principal reactivity of these functional groups.
Stereochemistry.
Rection mechanisms: SN1- and SN2-reactions, electrophilic aromatic subtitutions, eliminations (E1 and E2), addition reactions (C=C and C=O double bonds). Chemistry of carbony and carboxyl groups.
Lecture notesC.E.Housecroft, E.C.Constable, Chemistry, 4rd Edition, Pearson, Harlow (England), 2010 (ISBN 0-131-27567-4), Kap. 18-33
LiteratureTh.L.Brown, H.E.LeMay, B.E.Bursten; Chemie, 10. Auflage, Pearson Studium, München, 2007 (ISBN 3-8273-7191-0)

D.W.Oxtoby, H.P.Gillis, N.H.Nachtrieb, Principles of Modern Chemistry, Fifth Edition, Thomson, London, 2002 (ISBN 0-03-035373-4)
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityassessed
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
752-0100-AALBiochemistry
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RC. Frei
AbstractBasic knowledge of enzymology, in particular the structure, kinetics and chemistry of enzyme-catalysed reaction in vitro and in vivo. Biochemistry of metabolism: Those completing the course are able to describe and understand fundamental cellular metabolic processes.
ObjectiveIn this self-study course, the students will gain solid biochemical knowledge about enzymology, membrane biochemistry, and central metabolism.
ContentProgram

Introduction, basics, composition of cells, biochemical units,
Structure and function of proteins
Enzymes and enzyme kinetics
Carbohydrates
Lipids and biological membranes
Cellular metabolism: Glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, glycogen metabolism, citric acid cycle, electron transport and ATP synthesis
Lecture notesPrinciples of Biochemistry (5th Edition) 5th Edition
by Laurence A. Moran (Author), Robert A Horton (Author), Gray Scrimgeour (Author), Marc Perry (Author)
LiteraturePrinciples of Biochemistry (5th Edition) 5th Edition
by Laurence A. Moran (Author), Robert A Horton (Author), Gray Scrimgeour (Author), Marc Perry (Author)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in biology and chemistry
752-4001-AALMicrobiology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RM. Ackermann
AbstractTeaching of basic knowledge in microbiology with main focus on Microbial Cell Structure and Function, Molecular Genetics, Microbial Growth, Metabolic Diversity, Phylogeny and Taxonomy, Prokaryotic Diversity, Human-Microbe Interactions, Biotechnology.
ObjectiveVermittlung der Grundlagen im Fach Mikrobiologie.
ContentDer Schwerpunkt liegt auf den Themen: Bakterielle Zellbiologie, Molekulare Genetik, Wachstumsphysiologie, Biochemische Diversität, Phylogenie und Taxonomie, Prokaryotische Vielfalt, Interaktion zwischen Menschen und Mikroorganismen sowie Biotechnologie.
Lecture notesWird von den jeweiligen Dozenten ausgegeben.
LiteratureDie Behandlung der Themen erfolgt auf der Basis des Lehrbuchs Brock, Biology of Microorganisms
406-0023-AALPhysics Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RS. Johnson
AbstractBasic topics in classical as well as modern physics, interplay between basic research and applications.
ObjectiveThis is a self-learning unit and the goal is to acquire basic concepts in classical and modern physics, as well as general methods of problem solving for these subjects.
ContentElectrodynamics, Thermodynamics, Quantum physics, Waves and Oscillations, special relativity
LiteratureP.A. Tipler and G. Mosca, Physics for scientists and engineers, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityassessed
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
406-0603-AALStochastics (Probability and Statistics)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RM. Kalisch
AbstractIntroduction to basic methods and fundamental concepts of statistics and
probability theory for non-mathematicians. The concepts are presented on
the basis of some descriptive examples. The course will be based on the
book "Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et.al. and on the
book "Introductory Statistics with R" by P. Dalgaard.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to build a solid fundament in probability
and statistics. The student should understand some fundamental concepts and
be able to apply these concepts to applications in the real
world. Furthermore, the student should have a basic knowledge of the
statistical programming language "R". The main topics of the course are:
- Introduction to probability
- Common distributions
- Binomialtest
- z-Test, t-Test
- Regression
ContentFrom "Statistics for research":
Ch 1: The Role of Statistics
Ch 2: Populations, Samples, and Probability Distributions
Ch 3: Binomial Distributions
Ch 6: Sampling Distribution of Averages
Ch 7: Normal Distributions
Ch 8: Student's t Distribution
Ch 9: Distributions of Two Variables [Regression]

From "Introductory Statistics with R":
Ch 1: Basics
Ch 2: Probability and distributions
Ch 3: Descriptive statistics and tables
Ch 4: One- and two-sample tests
Ch 5: Regression and correlation
Literature"Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et. al. (3rd
edition); Print ISBN: 9780471267355; Online ISBN: 9780471477433; DOI:
10.1002/0471477435;
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link

"Introductory Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard; ISBN
978-0-387-79053-4; DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79054-1
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link
406-0141-AALLinear Algebra
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Akka Ginosar
AbstractIntroduction to Linear Algebra and Numerical Analysis for Engineers. The contents of the course are covered in the book "Introduction to Linear Algebra" by Gilbert Strang (SIAM, 2003). MATLAB is used as a tool to formulate and implement numerical algorithms.
ObjectiveTo acquire basic knowledge of Linear Algebra and of a few fundamental numerical techniques. The course is meant to
hone analytic and algorithmic skills.
Content1. Vectors and vector spaces
2. Solving linear systems of equations (Gaussian elimination)
3. Orthogonality
4. Determinants
5. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors
6. Linear transformations
7. Numerical linear algebra in MATLAB
8. (Piecewise) polynomial interpolation
9. Splines
LiteratureG. Strang, "Introduction to linear algebra", Third edition, 2003,
ISBN 0-9614088-9-8, Link

T. Sauer. "Numerical analysis", Addison-Wesley 2006
406-0242-AALAnalysis II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RM. Akveld
AbstractMathematical tools of an engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems, mathematical formulation of problems in science and engineering. Basic mathematical knowledge of an engineer
ContentMulti variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
Literature- James Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole
- William L. Briggs / Lyle Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education (Chapters 10 - 14)
406-0243-AALAnalysis I and II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-14 credits30RM. Akveld
AbstractMathematical tools for the engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems. Mathematical formulation of technical and scientific problems. Basic mathematical knowledge for engineers.
ContentShort introduction to mathematical logic.
Complex numbers.
Calculus for functions of one variable with applications.
Simple types of ordinary differential equations.
Simple Mathematical models in engineering.

Multi variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
LiteratureTextbooks in English:
- J. Stewart: Calculus, Cengage Learning, 2009, ISBN 978-0-538-73365-6
- J. Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole (e.g. Appendix G on complex numbers)
- V. I. Smirnov: A course of higher mathematics. Vol. II. Advanced calculus
- W. L. Briggs, L. Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education
Textbooks in German:
- M. Akveld, R. Sperb: Analysis I, vdf
- M. Akveld, R. Sperb: Analysis II, vdf
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler, Vieweg Verlag
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure 2, Vieweg Verlag
102-0474-AALIntroduction to Water Resources Management
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits4RP. Burlando
AbstractThe course offers an introduction to the basics of water resources analysis and management covering the topics of water demand vs availability, water exploitation and reservoir design, aquatic physics, water quality and pollution, water conservation and remediation in rivers, lakes and aquifers, sustainable water use.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the basics of water resources management based on physical and chemical processes; principle of sustainability
ContentAquatische Physik: Flusshydraulik, Seehydraulik, Grundwasserhydraulik, Zeitkonstanten und Grössenordnungen, Flussmorphologie und Sedimenttransport.
Wassergüte: Anforderungen, Schadstoffausbreitung, Selbstreinigung, Thermische Belastung, relevante Schadstoffe und Quellen, Stossbelastungen, Zeitkonstanten und Grössenordnungen.
Wasserwirtschaft: Struktur von Dargebot und Nachfrage.
Optionen zur Schliessung der Disparität: Reservoire, Grundwasserspeicher, Überleitungen, Wasserwirtschaftliche Rahmenplanung (Masterplan) , Gewässerschutz, Sanierung und Renaturierung (Oberflächengewässer und Grundwasser), Variabilität, Stochastik und Risiko.
Nachhaltigkeit: Definitionen, Beispiele für nicht-nachhaltiges Wirtschaften, Wasserprobleme der Entwicklungsländer, Wasser und Landwirtschaft, Projektbewertung und Umweltverträglichkeitsprüfung. Ökonomische und Soziologische Bezüge.

Alle Aspekte sollen mit Fallbeispielen illustriert werden.
Die Übungen werden zum grössten Teil auf analytischen Formeln beruhen. Einige Übungen benötigen den Computer.
Lecture notesSkript in wöchentlichen Folgen.
102-0293-AALHydrology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RP. Burlando
AbstractDiese Lehrveranstaltung führt in die Ingenieur-Hydrologie ein. Zuerst werden Grundlagen zur Beschreibung und Messung hydrologischer Vorgänge (Niederschlag, Rückhalt, Verdunstung, Abfluss, Erosion, Schnee) vermittelt, anschliessend wird in grundlegende mathematische Modelle zur Modellierung einzelner Prozesse und der Niederschlag-Abfluss-Relation eingeführt, inkl. Hochwasser-Analyse.
ObjectiveKenntnis der Grundzüge der Hydrologie. Kennenlernen von Methoden, zur Abschätzung hydrologischer Grössen, die zur Dimensionierung von Wasserbauwerken und für die Nutzung von Wasserresourcen relevant sind.
ContentDer hydrologische Kreislauf: globale Wasserressourcen, Wasserbilanz, räumliche und zeitliche Dimension der hydrologischen Prozesse.

Niederschlag: Niederschlagsmechanismen, Regenmessung, räumliche/zeitliche Verteilung des Regens, Niederschlagsregime, Punktniederschlag/Gebietsniederschlag, Isohyeten, Thiessenpolygon, Extremniederschlag, Dimensionierungsniederschlag.

Interzeption: Messung und Schätzung.

Evaporation und Evapotranspiration: Prozesse, Messung und Schätzung, potentielle und effektive Evapotranspiration, Energiebilanzmethode, empirische Methode.

Infiltration: Messung, Horton-Gleichung, empirische und konzeptionelle Methoden, F-index und Prozentuale Methode, SCS-CN Methode.

Einzugsgebietscharakteristik: Morphologie der Einzugsgebiets, topografische und unterirdische Wasserscheide, hypsometrische Kurve, Gefälle, Dichte des Entwässerungsnetzes.

Oberflächlicher und oberflächennaher Abfluss: Hortonischer Oberflächenabfluss, gesättigter Oberflächenabfluss, Abflussmessung, hydrologische Regimes, Jahresganglinien, Abflussganglinie von Extremereignissen, Abtrennung des Basisabflusses, Direktabfluss, Schneeschmelze, Abflussregimes, Abflussdauerkurve.

Stoffabtrag und Stofftransport: Erosion im Einzugsgebiet, Bodenerosion durch Wasser, Berechnung der Bodenerosion, Grundlagen des Sedimenttransports.

Schnee und Eis: Scnheeeigenschaften und -messungen Schätzung des Scnheeschmelzprozesses durch die Energiebilanzmethode, Abfluss aus Schneeschmelze, Temperatur-Index- und Grad-Tag-Verfahren.

Niederschlag-Abfluss-Modelle (N-A): Grundlagen der N-A Modelle, Lineare Modelle und das Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH) Konzept, linearer Speicher, Nash Modell.

Hochwasserabschätzung: empirische Formeln, Hochwasserfrequenzanalyse, Regionalisierungtechniken,
indirekte Hochwasserabschätzung mit N-A Modellen, Rational Method.
Lecture notesEin internes Skript ist zur Verfügung (kostenpflichtig, nur Herstellungskosten)

Die Kopie der Folien zur Vorlesung können auf den Webseiten der Professur für Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft herunterladen werden
LiteratureChow, V.T., D.R. Maidment und L.W. Mays (1988) Applied Hydrology, New York u.a., McGraw-Hill.
Dingman, S.L., (1994) Physical Hydrology, 2nd ed., Upper Saddle River, N.J., Prentice Hall
Dyck, S. und G. Peschke (1995) Grundlagen der Hydrologie, 3. Aufl., Berlin, Verlag für Bauwesen.
Maniak, U. (1997) Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft, eine Einführung für Ingenieure, Springer, Berlin.
Manning, J.C. (1997) Applied Principles of Hydrology, 3. Aufl., Upper Saddle River, N.J., Prentice Hall.
Prerequisites / NoticeVorbereitend zu Hydrologie I sind die Vorlesungen in Statistik. Der Inhalt, der um ein Teil der Übungen zu behandeln und um ein Teil der Vorlesungen zu verstehen notwendig ist, kann zusammengefasst werden, wie hintereinander es beschrieben wird:
Elementare Datenverarbeitung: Hydrologische Messungen und Daten, Datenreduzierung (grafische Darstellungen und numerische Kenngrössen).
Frequenzanalyse: Hydrologische Daten als Zufallsvariabeln, Wiederkehrperiode, Frequenzfaktor, Wahrscheinlichkeitspapier, Anpassen von Wahrscheinlichkeitsverteilungen, parametrische und nicht-parametrische Tests, Parameterschätzung.