Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Geomatic Engineering Master Information
Major Courses
Major in Engineering Geodesy and Photogrammetry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0738-00LGNSS LabW5 credits4GR. Hohensinn, G. Möller
AbstractConsolidation of knowledge in satellite geodesy and its application to GNSS.
ObjectiveStudents know the technological background of GNSS. They are able to interpret and to qualify GNSS results and to carry out error estimations. Autonomous work on GNSS-related problems.
ContentAutonomous development, planning, and carrying out of a small GNSS-project. As needed further satellite geodetic background will be given ( GNSS-positioning and navigation, satellite orbits, consolidated knowledge of GNSS, observation equations, principles of measurements, disturbances, practical operation)
Lecture notesNavigation, Alain Geiger, GGL-ETHZ
GNSS, Markus Rothacher, GGL-ETHZ
103-0838-00LGeomonitoring and GeosensorsW4 credits3GA. Wieser, M. Rothacher
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to sensors, measurement techniques and analysis methods for geodetic monitoring of natural structures of local to regional scale like landslides, rock falls, volcanoes and tsunamis. Several case studies will highlight the application of the presented technologies.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the core challenges and proven approaches to monitoring of local and regional deformation; gaining an overview of established measurement and data processing techniques for monitoring geometric changes.
ContentIntroduction to geomonitoring; sensors and measurement technologies: GNSS, TPS, TLS, GB-SAR, geosensor networks, geotechnical monitoring sensors; areal and point-wise deformation monitoring; congruency tests, network deformation analysis, sensitivity, regression and jump detection; estimation of strain tensor, block analysis; case studies.
Lecture notesThe lecture slides and further literature will be made available on the course webpage.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should be familiar with geodetic networks, parameter estimation, GNSS and Engineering Geodesy. Students who have not taken the related courses of the ETH curriculum (or equivalent courses at another university) but want to take this course should contact the lecturers beforehand.
103-0128-00LRemote Sensing Lab Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2GE. Baltsavias
AbstractThis course focuses mainly on photogrammetric processing and classification of optical and especially multispectral satellite images with practical work and own programming.
ObjectiveThe aims of this course are:
- the main aim is practical photogrammetric processing and classification of optical and especially multispectral satellite images using mostly own programming in MATLAB and less commercial software tools.
- some theoretical background will be provided, in addition to other ETHZ courses mentioned below (mainly given in Bachelor).
- further developing skills in report writing and presentations.
ContentThe lecture builds on the courses Erdbeobachtung (Earth Observation), Photogrammetrie, Photogrammetrie II, Image Interpretation and Bildverarbeitung (Image Processing). The focus is on practical work and use of programs with optical satellite data.

The work is composed of two large labs. In the first, the main photogrammetric processing chain from preprocessing to visualisation is treated. In the second, the focus is on various multispectral classification techniques and their comparison.
Lecture notesTeaching material will be made available on the dedicated moodle page.
Prerequisites / NoticePersons without sufficient knowledge of remote sensing, photogrammetry and image processing, should first contact the lecturer and get permission to attend the course. Students should preferably have a basic knowledge of MATLAB programming or being willing to acquire it through self-study.
103-0848-00LIndustrial Metrology and Machine Vision Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W4 credits3GK. Schindler, A. Wieser
AbstractThis course introduces contact and non-contact techniques for 3D coordinate, shape and motion determination as used for 3D inspection, dimensional control, reverse engineering, motion capture and similar industrial applications.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the physical basis of photographic sensors and imaging; familiarization with a broader view of image-based 3D geometry estimation beyond the classical photogrammetric approach; understanding the concepts of measurement traceability and uncertainty; acquiring an overview of general 3D image metrology including contact and non-contact techniques (coordinate measurement machines; optical tooling; laser-based high-precision instruments).
ContentCCD and CMOS technology; structured light and active stereo; shading models, shape from shading and photometric stereo; shape from focus; laser interferometry, laser tracker, laser radar; contact and non-contact coordinate measurement machines; optical tooling; measurement traceability, measurement uncertainty, calibration of measurement systems; 3d surface representations; case studies.
Lecture notesLecture slides and further literature will be made available on the course webpage.
103-0767-00LEngineering Geodesy LabW4 credits3PA. Wieser, V. Frangez, Z. Gojcic
AbstractDevelopment of concepts and solutions for challenging tasks in Engineering Geodesy using real-world examples
ObjectiveThe students learn to develop, assess and realize concepts and solutions for real-world problems in Engineering Geodesy. They advance the knowledge and skills which they have acquired in relation with geodetic metrology, engineering geodesy. They establish links between these subjects. Particular attention is paid to the selection of appropriate sensors and measurement systems, selection of appropriate measurement and data processing methods, end-to-end quality control, fulfillment of non-technical criteria, and to the documentation of the work.
ContentA geodetic network for highly precise coordinate and direction transfer from outside pillars to pillars in the geodetic metrology lab of the Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry will be designed and planned. Different methods for plumbing, height transfer and azimuth determination will be included. The measurements will be carried out and post-processed in teams. Finally, the network design, the observation schedule and the results will be critically evaluated.
Lecture notesPublications and documents are made available as needed depending on the selected tasks.
Literature- Möser, M. et al. (2000): Handbuch Ingenieurgeodäsie, Grundlagen. Wichmann, Heidelberg.
- Heunecke et al. (2013): Handbuch Ingenieurgeodäsie, Auswertung geodätischer Überwachungsmessungen. 2. Aufl., Wichmann, Heidelberg.
- Schofield, W. and Breach, M. (2007): Engineering Surveying. 6th Edition, CRC, Boca Raton, USA.
- Caspary, W.F. (2000): Concepts of Network and Deformation Analysis. School of Geomatic Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful participation in the lab requires knowledge and experiences conveyed within the related course "Engineering Geodesy". Students who have not already passed that course and who are not participating in that course will only be admitted to the lab after discussion with the instructors.

If the timetable of the participants allows it, the 3-hourly lab units will partially be combined to individual full-time units.
052-0524-00L360° - Reality to Virtuality (FS) Information Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2GK. Sander
AbstractBasics of 3D-scanning of rooms and bodies, individual scan projects, 3D-visualizations and animations. Definition and realization of a project, working alone and in groups.
ObjectiveUnderstanding 3D-technologies, handling positive and negative spaces, handling hardware and software, processing 3D point clouds (registering scans, filtering, merging of data sets, precision, visualizations, animation), interpretation of the generated data.
Content1. Introduction to 3D laser scanning (getting to know technologies, methods and context; carry out practical tests)
2. Project development within the group (idea, concept, target, intention, selection of methods & strategies)
3. Project implementation within the group (possible results, videos, pictures, prints, publications, web, blog, forum etc.)
4. Project presentation (exhibition incl. critiques, discussions)
Major in Space Geodesy and Navigation
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0158-01LNavigationW5 credits4GG. Möller
AbstractIntroduction to the concepts and basics of navigation related total systems on land, air, sea and space
ObjectiveThe students gain an overview of human spatial navigation concepts as well as modern navigation systems and their major principles. The students are able to deepen their knowledge by their own and recognize and understand principles of systems in different applications.
ContentConcepts of human spatial navigation, Reference systems, Navigation principles, Statistics in Navigation, Filtering, Basics of state space control systems, Satellite navigation systems, Vehicle nav, Air traffic control systems, Spacecraft and autonomous navigation.
Lecture notesMoeller G., Navigation, Lecture notes
LiteratureEkstrom A. D., Spiers H. J., BohbotV. D., Rosenbaum R. S., Human Spatial Navigation, Prinction University Press, ISBN 9780691171746, 216 p., 2018

Hofmann-Wellenhof B., Legat K., Wieser M., Navigation, Springer Nature, ISBN 9783211008287, 427 p., 2003
103-0178-00LGeodetic Earth MonitoringW4 credits3GM. Rothacher
AbstractThe three pillars of geodesy, i.e. the geometry, rotation and gravity field of the Earth contribute to Earth system monitoring and will be considered here. 1) Earth rotation: theory, estimation and interpretation; 2) Gravity field: satellite missions, theory, estimation and interpretation; 3) Geodynamics (geometry): plate tectonics, earthquake cycle, isostasy and uplift rates.
ObjectiveUnderstand the basics of Earth rotation and gravity field theory, with what type of methods they are determined and what they contribute to monitoring the Earth system. Get familiar with the major geodynamic processes within the crust and mantle and how they are being observed and monitored.
ContentPart 1: Earth rotation
- Kinematics of a solid body
- Dynamic Eulerian equations of Earth rotation
- Kinematic Eulerian equations of Earth rotation
- Free rotation of the flattened Earth
- Influence of Sun and Moon, Precession, Nutation
- Earth as an elastic body
- Determination of Earth rotation parameters
- Mass distribution and mass transport affecting Earth rotation
Part 2: Gravity field
- Satellite missions
- Gravity field determination from satellite data
- Geoid computation from terrestrial data
- Combination of satellite and terrestrial gravity fields
- Precision of geoid computations
- Mass distribution and transport affecting the Earth gravity field
Part 3: Geodynamics:
- Plate tectonics theory: including ocean bottom floor magnetism Curie temperature, age of the ocean bottom floor
- Notions on crust material (oceanic/continental)
- Concepts of mantle plumes, mantle convection and mantle flow and evidences supporting them
- Earthquake cycle: elastic rebound theory, strain and stress measurements and measurements in the field during inter-, co- and post-seismic periods
- Isostasy and strength models
- Surface uplift rate applied to continental crust, volcanism, eroded areas.
Lecture notesA script and slides will be made available
LiteratureBeutler G., Methods of Celestial Mechanics. II: Application to Planetary System, Geodynamics and Satellite Geodesy, Springer, ISBN 3-540-40750-2, 2005.

Hofmann-Wellenhof B. and Moritz H., Physical Geodesy, Springer, ISBN 13-978-3-211-33544-4, 2005/2006.

Fowler C.M.R., The Solid Earth: An Introduction to Global Geophysics, Cambridge Univ. Press, ISBN 0-521-38590-3, 2005.
Prerequisites / NoticeRecommended: Basics of Higher Geodesy
Of advantage: Basics of Geodetic Earth Observation
103-0738-00LGNSS LabW5 credits4GR. Hohensinn, G. Möller
AbstractConsolidation of knowledge in satellite geodesy and its application to GNSS.
ObjectiveStudents know the technological background of GNSS. They are able to interpret and to qualify GNSS results and to carry out error estimations. Autonomous work on GNSS-related problems.
ContentAutonomous development, planning, and carrying out of a small GNSS-project. As needed further satellite geodetic background will be given ( GNSS-positioning and navigation, satellite orbits, consolidated knowledge of GNSS, observation equations, principles of measurements, disturbances, practical operation)
Lecture notesNavigation, Alain Geiger, GGL-ETHZ
GNSS, Markus Rothacher, GGL-ETHZ
103-0838-00LGeomonitoring and GeosensorsW4 credits3GA. Wieser, M. Rothacher
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to sensors, measurement techniques and analysis methods for geodetic monitoring of natural structures of local to regional scale like landslides, rock falls, volcanoes and tsunamis. Several case studies will highlight the application of the presented technologies.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the core challenges and proven approaches to monitoring of local and regional deformation; gaining an overview of established measurement and data processing techniques for monitoring geometric changes.
ContentIntroduction to geomonitoring; sensors and measurement technologies: GNSS, TPS, TLS, GB-SAR, geosensor networks, geotechnical monitoring sensors; areal and point-wise deformation monitoring; congruency tests, network deformation analysis, sensitivity, regression and jump detection; estimation of strain tensor, block analysis; case studies.
Lecture notesThe lecture slides and further literature will be made available on the course webpage.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should be familiar with geodetic networks, parameter estimation, GNSS and Engineering Geodesy. Students who have not taken the related courses of the ETH curriculum (or equivalent courses at another university) but want to take this course should contact the lecturers beforehand.
103-0157-00LPhysical Geodesy and GeodynamicsW4 credits3GM. Rothacher
AbstractGravity field of the earth. Equipotential surfaces and geoid determination. Fundamentals in Potential Theory and inversion methods. Measuring techniques and gravity anomalies.
ObjectiveObtain knowledge in Physical Geodesy as a fundamental topic forming the basis for Geomatics and Geodynamics. Acquire skills in calculus covered in Physical Geodesy.
ContentGravity field of the earth and its parameterization. Equipotential surfaces, deflections of the vertical and geoid determination. Fundamentals in Potential Theory and inversion methods. Gravimetric measuring techniques and gravity anomalies.
Prerequisites / NoticePre-Requisite: Basics of Higher Geodesy
Major in GIS and Cartography
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0228-00LMultimedia Cartography
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Cartography III (103-0227-00L).
O4 credits3GH.‑R. Bär, R. Sieber
AbstractFocus of this course is on the realization of an atlas project in a small team. During the first part of the course, the necessary organizational, creative and technological basics will be provided. At the end of the course, the interactive atlas projects will be presented by the team members.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students the theoretical background, knowledge and practical skills necessary to plan, design and create an interactive Web atlas based on modern Web technologies.
ContentThis course will cover the following topics:

- Web map design
- Project management
- Graphical user interfaces in Web atlases
- Interactions in map and atlas applications
- Web standards
- Programming interactive Web applications
- Use of software libraries
- Cartographic Web services
- Code repository
- Copyright and the Internet
Lecture notesLecture notes and additional material are available on Moodle.
Literature- Cartwright, William; Peterson, Michael P. and Georg Gartner (2007); Multimedia Cartography, Springer, Heidelberg
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Successful completion of Cartography III (103-0227-00L).
Previous knowledge in Web programming.

The students are expected to
- present their work in progress on a regular basis
- present their atlas project at the end of the course
- keep records of all the work done
- document all individual contributions to the project
103-0247-00LMobile GIS and Location-Based ServicesO5 credits4GP. Kiefer
AbstractThe course introduces students to the theoretical and technological background of mobile geographic information systems and location-based services. In lab sessions students acquire competences in mobile GIS design and implementation.
ObjectiveStudents will
- learn about the implications of mobility on GIS
- get a detailed overview on research fields related to mobile GIS
- get an overview on current mobile GIS and LBS technology, and learn how to assess new technologies in this fast-moving field
- achieve an integrated view of Geospatial Web Services and mobile GIS
- acquire competences in mobile GIS design and implementation
Content- LBS and mobile GIS: architectures, market, applications, and application development
- Development for Android
- Introduction to augmented reality development (HoloLens)
- Mobile decision-making, context, personalization, and privacy
- Mobile human computer interaction and user interfaces
- Mobile behavior interpretation
Prerequisites / NoticeElementary programming skills (Java)
103-0747-00LCartography LabW6 credits13AL. Hurni
AbstractIndependent practical work in cartography.
ObjectiveIndependent practical work in cartography.
ContentChoice of theme upon individual agreement.
Lecture notesInformation sheet will be distributed by the supervisors
Prerequisites / NoticeCartography Fundamentals
Major in Planning
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0458-00LEconomical Land Use
Only for MSc Students or special approval by the lecturer.
W3 credits2GR. Nebel
AbstractThe lecture demonstrates current trends of land use, arguments for an economical handling of land and instruments as well as procedures to implement economical land use in practice. This is considered on different planning levels, especially on the regional level. The main focus is the introduction of a comprehensive settlement management in the light of current trends of land use.
ObjectiveStudents learn to understand backgrounds, basic principles, goals and approaches of appropriate and economical use of land as a scarce resource. They are able to summarise in a comprehensible way the core arguments for redevelopment before new development. Furthermore, students can illustrate how to implement economical land use in a differentiated and customised manner.
Content- settlement development and land use: facts, trends, causes and consequences
- redevelopment before new development: basic principles and strategic goals
- overviews of existing land reserves
- formal and informal instruments and procedures
- comprehensive settlement management: implementation on municipal, regional and national level
Lecture notesThe documents for the lecture are available on Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeEligible only for master students, otherwise a special permisson by the lecturer is required.
103-0318-02LGIS-Based 3D Landscape Visualization Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.

Please send an email to the lecturer to make sure that places are still available.
W3 credits2GU. Wissen Hayek
AbstractConcepts, methods and techniques for 3D landscape visualization and their application in landscape and environmental planning. Practical application of a workflow for 3D landscape visualization. Reflection of relevant aspects such as the choice of viewpoints, the landscape sections, or the level of detail, and their effects on the perception of the visualized landscape.
ObjectiveThe main goals of this lab are (1) to know digital techniques for 3D landscape visualization, (2) to know different examples and application areas for GIS-based 3D landscape visualizations, (3) to establish software skills in 3D landscape visualization, and (4) to be able to explain principles of 3D landscape visualization, which are important for landscape and environmental planning situations, and to apply these for the evaluation or the planning of 3D landscape visualizations.
ContentThe lectures provide an introduction to the area of GIS-based 3D landscape visualization and on visualization principles. Examples of 3D landscape visualizations generated and applied in different projects are presented. The theoretical principles for 3D landscape visualization are further deepened in small exercises during the whole course. These exercises are organized in such a way, that a workflow for 3D landscape visualization can be reproduced. Thereby aspects such as the choice of viewpoints, the sections of a landscape, or the level of detail, and their effects on the perception of the visualized landscape are reflected.
Lecture notesHandouts of the slides used in the lectures will be made available for download.
Prerequisites / NoticeWill be specified in the course.
103-0338-00LProject Week in Landscape Development Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.
W5 credits9PS.‑E. Rabe, E. Celio, A. Grêt-Regamey
AbstractIn particular, the aspects measuring, understanding and assessing of landscape-relevant land-use, requirements and developments will be taught. Concerning the landscape development in a project area, aims will be developed and corresponding actions defined.
ObjectiveThe students are able to:
- recognize and undestand the history of land-use
- recognize and undestand the context of arrangement of a landscape
- assess a landscape in its entirety and in its single-elements
- understand and apply the concepts of the landscape approach
- prepare and provide substantiated actions
ContentThe course consists of
- four theoretical inputs from internal and external speakers
- a preliminary excursion to the project area
- two exercises for preparation
- the project week and the preparation of a report

Depending on the subject area to be processed (eg. water, landscape aesthetics, natural hazards, nature conservation), different methods are used.
This applies to both the methods of investigation of landscape-elements and characteristics as well as the methods for evaluation of landscape-elements and characteristics.

Subjects and methods are developed and defined in the preparation to be applied in the project week. Based on the assessments actions will be developed that are adapted to the definde question or problem in the light of a desirable development.
Lecture notes- Handouts
- Copies of selected literature

Download: Link
LiteratureWill be named in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements are an interest in landscape-related issues and commitment to developing proposals for solutions.
Prerequisite: Knowledge and skills equivalent the course 103-0357-00 Umweltplanung
103-0428-02LSpatial Design and Argumentation in Planning
Only for MSc Students or special approval by the lecturer.
W6 credits4GM. Nollert, M. Koll-Schretzenmayr, T. Lannuzel
AbstractDesigning and presenting arguments are two essential components of acting in spatial planning. Spatial design as instrument for investigating and testing of possible solutions and options of action or, in addition, for finding central questions. Arguing, in order to be able to communicate suggested decisions or actions inside the planning process and to win relevant actors over those.
ObjectiveGoal of the lecture is to obtain the basic knowledge of designing and presenting argumentations in spatial planning. With reference on a practical case study typical characteristics and the connections between arguing and designing in spatial planning are worked out.
In terms of arguing the students should be enabled to substantiate their decisions with different techniques, in order to compile clearly understandable and convincing argumentations and successfully communicate them. This includes beside an adequate handling of different kinds of information coding (like texts, pictures and numbers), also dealing with uncertainties, which is a typical asset of the argumentation in spatial planning.
In terms of spatial design, the understanding of this specific and unconventional instrument is to be provided and to be trained on the basis of different cases. Beside the development of an „intuition/sensibility“ for designing in spatial planning and the ability to handle different scales (from national contexts down to the proofing of the principal possibilities for development on the scale of architectural design), the discernment of decisive criteria for the possible employment and the application of spatial design is also to be trained.
Lecture notesThe documents for the lecture can be found in Moodle
Prerequisites / NoticeSpatial Planning Design

Spatial Planning Design is used as a tool for exploration and testing. Overall goal is the obtainment of basic knowledge for general recommendations and specific strategies in the case of difficult and unclear tasks. However, it is not intended to create drafts for direct implementation in reality.

Even if current problems and questions occuring in the dimension of spatial planning might show some correlation, the spaces themselves, the diversity of urban patterns and interests widely differ. This is particularly the case in highly developed Europe. As soon as conventional solutions and standards fail in the case of difficult and vast questions, modern spatial planning operates by using the method of designing.

In contrast to the method of designing on the basis of a given programme, which is common in the fields of urban design and architecture, spatial planning is generally operating with comprehensive and open terms of reference. Thus, in order to achieve safe results, spatial planning uses all imaginable scopes and freedoms of research.

Not every case and every problem in spatial planning cause an examination by using the method of designing. In frequent cases difficulties not only arise in identifying the right scale of design but rather in selecting the appropriate informal procedures. Furthermore, scales are not necessarily the same as they are typically used in regional- and urban planning. The verification of the general ability to develop an area in the scale of architecture is possible as well.
701-1522-00LMulti-Criteria Decision Analysis Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
W3 credits2GJ. Lienert
AbstractThis introduction to "Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis" (MCDA) combines prescriptive Decision Theory (MAVT, MAUT) with practical application and computer-based decision support systems. Aspects of descriptive Decision Theory (psychology) are introduced. Participants apply the theory to an environmental decision problem (group work).
ObjectiveThe main objective is to learn the theory of "Multi-Attribute Value Theory" (MAVT) and "Multi-Attribute Utility Theory" (MAUT) and apply it step-by-step using an environmental decision problem. The participants learn how to structure complex decision problems and break them down into manageable parts. An important aim is to integrate the goals and preferences of different decision makers. The participants will practice how to elicit subjective (personal) preferences from decision makers with structured interviews. They should have an understanding of people's limitations to decision-making, based on insights from descriptive Decision Theory. They will use formal computer-based tools to integrate "objective / scientific" data with "subjective / personal" preferences to find consensus solutions that are acceptable to different decision makers.
ContentGENERAL DESCRIPTION
Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis is an umbrella term for a set of methods to structure, formalize, and analyze complex decision problems involving multiple objectives (aims, criteria), many different alternatives (options, choices), and different actors which may have conflicting preferences. Uncertainty (e.g., of the future or of environmental data) adds to the complexity of environmental decisions. MCDA helps to make decision problems more transparent and guides decision makers into making rational choices. Today, MCDA-methods are being applied in many complex decision situations. This class is designed for participants interested in transdisciplinary approaches that help to better understand real-world decision problems and that contribute to finding sustainable solutions. The course focuses on "Multi-Attribute Value Theory" (MAVT) and "Multi-Attribute Utility Theory" (MAUT). It also gives a short introduction to behavioral Decision Theory, the psychological field of decision-making.

STRUCTURE
The course consists of a combination of lectures, exercises in the class, exercises in small groups, reading, and one mandatory exam. Some exercises are computer assisted, applying MCDA software. The participants will choose an environmental case study to work on in small groups throughout the semester. Additional reading from the textbook Eisenführ et al. (2010) is required.

GRADING
There will be one written examination at the end of the course that covers the important theory (50 % of final grade). The group work consists of two written reports (50 %).
Lecture notesNo script (see below)
LiteratureThe course is based on: Eisenführ, Franz; Weber, Martin; and Langer, Thomas (2010) Rational Decision Making. 1st edition, 447 p., Springer Verlag, ISBN 978-3-642-02850-2.

Additional reading material will be recommended during the course. Lecture slides will be made available for download.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires some understanding of (basic) mathematics. The "formal" parts are not too complicated and we will guide students through the mathematical applications and use of software.

The course is limited to 25 participants (first come, first served).
103-0448-01LTransformation of Urban Landscapes
Only for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
W3 credits2GJ. Van Wezemael, A. Gonzalez Martinez
AbstractThe lecture course addresses the transformation of urban landscapes towards sustainable inward development. The course reconnects two largely separated complexity approaches in «spatial planning» and «urban sciences» as a basic framework to look at a number of spatial systems considering economic, political, and cultural factors. Focus lies on participation and interaction of students in groups.
Objective- Understand cities as complex adaptive systems
- Understand planning in a complex context and planning competitions as decision-making
- Seeing cities through big data and understand (Urban) Governance as self-organization
- Learn Design-Thinking methods for solving problems of inward development
- Practice presentation skills
- Practice argumentation and reflection skills by writing critiques
- Practice writing skills in a small project
- Practice teamwork
ContentStarting point and red thread of the lecture course is the transformation of urban landscapes as we can see for example across the Swiss Mittelland - but in fact also globally. The lecture course presents a theoretical foundation to see cities as complex systems. On this basis it addresses practical questions as well as the complex interplay of economic, political or spatial systems.

While cities and their planning were always complex the new era of globalization exposed and brought to the fore this complexity. It created a situation that the complexity of cities can no longer be ignored. The reason behind this is the networking of hitherto rather isolated places and systems across scales on the basis of Information and Communication Technologies. «Parts» of the world still look pretty much the same but we have networked them and made them strongly interdependent. This networking fuels processes of self-organization. In this view regions emerge from a multitude of relational networks of varying geographical reach and they display intrinsic timescales at which problems develop. In such a context, an increasing number of planning problems remain unaffected by either «command-and-control» approaches or instruments of spatial development that are one-sidedly infrastructure- or land-use orientated. In fact, they urge for novel, more open and more bottom-up assembling modes of governance and a «smart» focus on how space is actually used. Thus, in order to be effective, spatial planning and governance must be reconceptualised based on a complexity understanding of cities and regions, considering self-organizing and participatory approaches and the increasingly available wealth of data.
LiteratureA reader with original papers will be provided via the ILIAS system.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
Electives
The entire course programs of ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich are open to the students to individual selection.
Electives ETH Zurich
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Recommended Electives of Master Degree Programme
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0459-00LLogistics and Freight TransportationW6 credits4GF. Corman, K. Brossok, D. Bruckmann, M. Ruesch, T. Schmid, A. Trivella
AbstractBasics and concepts of logistics and freight transport; offers, infrastructure and production processes of different transport systems; regulatory framework
ObjectiveIdentification and understanding the interconnections between logistic requirements, market, transport offers, operational processes, transport means and regulation in freight transport of all transport systems (road, rail, intermodal, waterborne and air).
ContentBasics and concepts of logistics, actors in logistics and freight transport, transport demand (1) in-house logistics, storage, transport safety, dangerous goods (2), basics to transport offers, production processes and infrastructure for road, rail, intermodal, waterborne (sea and inland waterways) and air transport, urban logistics (3), transport policy, regulation, spatial planning, location issues and network design with optimization methods (4)
Lecture notesLecture slides in German or English will be provided.
101-0488-01LHuman Powered MobilityW6 credits4GU. Walter, E. Bosina, M. Meeder
AbstractBasics of pedestrian transport planning and planning of cycle traffic facilities,
Transport-related attributes of the human being,
Design of pedestrian and cycle traffic networks,
Pedestrian and cycle traffic facilities,
Microsimulation of pedestrian flows,
Assessment of performance and level of service
ObjectiveAcquirement of basic knowledge in the field of pedestrian and cycle traffic planning,
Knowledge and understanding of the transport-related attributes of human beings and the consequences for the design and planning of appropriate transport facilities,
Ability to assess level of service and performance,
Basic knowledge about pedestrian microsimulation as an up-to-date instrument for planning and analysis
Content1) Introduction to human-powered mobility
2) Characteristics of bicycle transport
3) Principles of bicycle networks
4) Exercise: design of a bicycle network
5) design and development of bicycle traffic facilities
6) Bicycle parking
7) Characteristics of pedestrians, walking speed
8) Quality of traffic conditions and capacity of cycling and walking facilities
9) design and development of pedestrian traffic facilities
10) Configuration and design of pedestrian traffic facilities in public transport hubs
11) Obstacle free traffic areas - Demands of people with disabilities
12) Counting pedestrian and bicycle traffic
13) Pedestrian simulations
14) Technologies for pedestrian micro-simulations
15) Exercise: Design of pedestrian facilities
16) Shared Space
17) Promoting pedestrian and bicycle transport
18) Excursions to selected topics in pedestrian and bicycle transport
Lecture notesSlides and other course materials will be provided on this course's Moodle page.
LiteratureReferences for further reading will be provided during the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeDuring the semester there will be 2 supporting exercises as well as 2 field trips covering pedestrian and bicycle transport.
101-0478-00LMeasurement and Modelling of Travel BehaviourW6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen
AbstractComprehensive introduction to survey methods in transport planning and modeling of travel behavior, using advanced discrete choice models.
ObjectiveEnabling the student to understand and apply the various measurement approaches and models of modelling travel behaviour.
ContentBehavioral model and measurement; travel diary, design process, hypothetical markets, discrete choice model, parameter estimation, pattern of travel behaviour, market segments, simulation, advanced discrete choice models
Lecture notesVarious papers and notes are distributed during the course.
103-0798-00LGeodetic Project Course Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 24.
W5 credits9PM. Rothacher, K. Schindler, A. Wieser
AbstractField course with practical geodetic projects (3 weeks)
ObjectiveField course with practical geodetic projects (3 weeks)
ContentSingle-handed treatment of current geodetic projects in groups of 3-5 students. Writing of a technical report with description of the project, calculations, results and interpretations. Possibility to continue the work in a semester or diploma thesis.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe 3-weeks course takes place June 10-28. The first two weeks are dedicated to field work, the 3rd week to finalise the projects in Zurich.
102-0617-01LMethodologies for Image Processing of Remote Sensing DataW3 credits2GI. Hajnsek, O. Frey, S. Leinss
AbstractThe aim of this course is to get an overview of several methodologies/algorithms for analysis of different sensor specific information products. It is focused at students that like to deepen their knowledge and understanding of remote sensing for environmental applications.
ObjectiveThe course is divided into two main parts, starting with a brief introduction to remote sensing imaging (4 lectures), and is followed by an introduction to different methodologies (8 lectures) for the quantitative estimation of bio-/geo-physical parameters. The main idea is to deepen the knowledge in remote sensing tools in order to be able to understand the information products, with respect to quality and accuracy.
ContentEach lecture will be composed of two parts:
Theory: During the first hour, we go trough the main concepts needed to understand the specific algorithm.
Practice: During the second hour, the student will test/develop the actual algorithm over some real datasets using Matlab. The student will not be asked to write all the code from scratch (especially during the first lectures), but we will provide some script with missing parts or pseudo-code. However, in the later lectures the student is supposed to build up some working libraries.
Lecture notesHandouts for each topic will be provided.
LiteratureSuggested readings:
T. M. Lillesand, R.W. Kiefer, J.W. Chipman, Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation, John Wiley & Sons Verlag, 2008
J. R. Jensen, Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, Prentice Hall Series in Geograpic Information Science, 2000
103-0427-00LRegional EconomicsW4 credits2GB. Buser, C. Abegg
AbstractThe lecture on Regional Economics focusses on the theoretical aspects of spatial factor allocation and of growth determinants. The course takes a top down stance and looks at regional development from a macroeconomic perspective. Implications of theoretical models on regional and growth policy will be discussed in and connections to the course Site Management will be made.
ObjectiveStudents shall know the theoretical basics of spatial economy and growth theories an a regional scale; they shall gain the competence to apply concepts and theories of spatial science as well as regional economics to concrete problems of their area of study.
ContentOrigin of "Spatial Economics"
Indices of regional economics and growth analysis
Regional advantages in competition and growth theories
Regional innovation theory (innovation processes, cluster theory and innovation policy)
Theory and political implications with examples (New Regional Policy NRP, Regional Innovation Systems RIS)
External Speaker and discussion of topicality by press
Lecture notesDownload two days before lecture: Link

Link
LiteratureLiterature is optional, there will be given hints to:

Bathelt, H., Glückler J. (2012): Wirtschaftsgeographie.
Ökonomische Beziehungen in räumlicher Perspektive. 3. Auflage. ISBN: 978-3-8252-8492-3

Eisenhut, P. (2014): Aktuelle Volkswirtschaftslehre 2018/2019.
Rüegger Verlag, Zürich. ISBN: 978-3-7253-1066-1

Eckey, H.-F. (2008): Regionalökonomie. GWV Fachverlag GmbH, Wiesbaden. ISBN: 978-3-8349-0999-2
101-0193-00LSystemic Design Labs: RE:GENERATE Alpine-Urban Circularity Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2ST. Luthe
AbstractSystemic design (SD) optimizes an entire system as a whole, rather than its parts in isolation. SD is iterative, recursive and circular, requires creative, curious, informed and critical systems thinking and doing, yielding radical resource efficiency. Systems mapping, design thinking, footprint assessment, test planning, prototyping, fabrication, social experiments are part of SD.
ObjectiveThe growing necessity to consider eco-social aspects makes design, planning and engineering practices more complex. Systemic design combines systems thinking skills with design thinking to address such complexity. The objectives of the course are to introduce students to the most important topics in systemic design methods, models, theory and methodology that form the basis for engineering, design and planning practices, and research for sustainability. A main goal is to develop whole systems thinking, life cycle and cradle to cradle thinking, to build knowledge on environmental impacts of materials and processes, and to stimulate overall reflective eco-social thinking in design, planning and engineering disciplines.The teaching purpose of Systemic Design Labs is to better tackle the complexity of today’s sustainability challenges. Often, in current education we learn to disassemble design challenges into their bits and parts for individual optimization. While being useful for developing topical expertise, this reductionism to parts with less emphasis on their interaction does not match with the growing complexity of today’s challenges. In contrast, systemic design approaches a task from a holistic perspective, zooming out of a system to reveal its structure and connections between its parts – to zoom in on the hub of influence that matters most.
ContentDesign Challenge: How to revive mountain livelihoods, focusing on local identity, resilient landscapes and a regenerative economy? The specific design challenge is to identify and layout a holistic, partly quantified and visualized systems strategy for building a resilient community economy on the case of Ostana, Italy, that embraces local identity, revitalizes cultural and landscape biodiversity, and creates alpine-urban circularity. A clear connection is between the local identity (culture, traditions, visions) which is formed by Occitan culture (food, music, dance, language), traditional stone building architecture which is under pressure to carefully evolve with new needs for carbon-neutral and net-positive buildings, and the Monte Viso landscape. How does a re-growing economy that should be regenerative and circular by design, correlate with innovation in architecture, with population growth and associated challenges in mobility, waste systems and supplies, with growing tourism, new agro-forestry practices like industrial hemp and Paulownia, while impacts of climate change are clearly visible? How does the community design a vision that is based on cooperation on different governance scales, balancing local identity and urgently needed international innovation?

Deliverables & output: This SDL course RE:GENERATE builds upon related work from former courses hosted and lead by the MonViso Institute (i.e. on social innovation, mobility, architecture and local identity, tourism, circular economy, land use change) to develop and design foundations for a visualized and partly quantified systems map, that will support ongoing and future innovation processes in this community. Foci are the interplay of architecture, circular economy, land use change, and identity. The map will be accompanied by a detailed report.
Lecture notessee learning materials
Literaturee.g. Striebig, B. and Ogundipe, A. 2016. Engineering Applications in Sustainable Design and Development. ISBN-10: 8131529053.
Jones, P. 2014. Design research methods for systemic design: Perspectives from design education and practice. Proceedings of ISSS 2014, July 28 – Aug1, 2014, Washington, D.C.

Blizzard, J. L. and L. E. Klotz. 2012. A framework for sustainable whole systems design. Design Studies 33(5).

Brown, T. and J. Wyatt. 2010. Design thinking for social innovation. Stanford Social Innovation Review. Stanford University.

Fischer, M. 2015. Design it! Solving Sustainability problems by applying design thinking. GAIA 24/3:174-178.

Luthe, T., Kaegi, T. and J. Reger. 2013. A Systems Approach to Sustainable Technical Product Design. Combining life cycle assessment and virtual development in the case of skis. Journal of Industrial Ecology 17(4), 605-617. DOI: 10.1111/jiec.12000
Prerequisites / NoticePrior to the start of the field course, participants have to prepare a presentation based on pre-given topics.
After the field trip, students have to work alone and in teams on the preparation of the deliverables, a systemic strategy map and a written report.
Seminar Work
Interdisciplinary Project takes only place in autumn semester (HS).
Interdisciplinary Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0298-02LInterdisciplinary Project Restricted registration - show details
Usually in HS. Registration in FS only in exceptional cases. For further information please contact the Study Administration Office Geospatial Engineering early on.
O12 credits24AProfessors
AbstractWorking on a concrete interdisciplinary task in Geomatics
ObjectivePromote independent, structured and scientific work in an interdisciplinary context; learn to apply engineering methods; deepen the knowledge in the field of the treated task.
ContentThe project work is supervised by a professor. Students can choose from different subjects and tasks.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe project can be carried out in German upon mutual agreement between supervisor and student.
GESS Science in Perspective
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-BAUG
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0009-00LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Before starting the Master's thesis, students must have
a. obtained the Bachelor's degree;
b. fulfilled all specified admission conditions, if any;
c. acquired at least 90 credits in the Master's programme, including 12 credits in the area of the interdisciplinary project.
O24 credits51DSupervisors
AbstractThe Master Programme concludes with the Master Thesis, which has to be done in one of the chosen Majors and has to be completed within 16 weeks. The Master Thesis is supervised by a professor and shall attest the students ability to work independently and to produce scientifically structured work.
ObjectiveTo work independently and to produce a scientifically structured work.
ContentThe topics of the Mastrer Thesis are published by the professors. The Topic can be set also in consultation between the student and the professor.
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
103-0115-AALGeodetic Metrology II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Wieser
AbstractAdvanced studies of the topics of the lecture "Basics of Geodetic Metrology". Knowing important aspects of the practical use of geodetic sensors and the work flows of metrology. Know-how of coordinate calculation methods and statistical aspects of Geodesy.
ObjectiveAdvanced studies of the topics of the lecture "Basics of Geodetic Metrology". Knowing important aspects of the practical use of geodetic sensors and the work flows of metrology. Know-how of coordinate calculation methods and statistical aspects of Geodesy.
ContentApplication and field tests of geodetic sensors: levelling instruments, tacheometers, GPS, laserscanning; geodetic coordinate calculations: traverses and trigonometric leveling; refraction; introduction to inertial surveying; software tools for data acquisition, data evaluation, preparation and visualisation of measurements
Lecture notesSlides of the regular lecture will be provided (in German), and further reading will be indicated as necessary.
LiteratureWitte B, Sparla P (2015) Vermessungskunde und Grundlagen der Statistik für das Bauwesen. 8. Aufl., Wichmann Verlag (in German)

Uren J, Price WF (2010) Surveying for Engineers. Palgrave Macmillan

A list of references for further reading will be provided.
103-0126-AALGeodetic Reference Systems
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Rothacher
AbstractFundamentals and theory of geodetic reference systems and frames. Introduction to current international systems as well as to systems for the Swiss national geodetic survey.
ObjectiveProvision of fundamental knowledge and theory to get familiar with the applications of geodetic reference systems. Special emphasis will be placed on international global systems as well as on the systems of the Swiss national geodetic survey.
ContentVarious coordinate systems and transformations;
reference systems and frames (inertial, Earth-fixed, topocentric) and associated transformations between the systems;
introduction to Earth rotation theory;
time systems;
Swiss national geodetic survey
Lecture notesWill be provided on ILIAS
LiteratureWill be provided on ILIAS
103-0132-AALGeodetic Metrology Fundamentals
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RA. Wieser
AbstractIntroduction to the most important sensors, operation and calculation methods of Geodetic Metrology
ObjectiveGetting to know the most important sensors, operation and calculation methods of Geodetic Metrology
ContentOverview on the different domains of geodetic metrology
Geodetic instruments and sensors
Determination of 3D-coordinates with GNSS, total sttaion and levelling
Calculation methods of geodetic metrology
Assessment of precision, introduction to variance propagation
Survey and staking-out methods
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture "Geodätische Messtechnik Grundzüge" (in German) will be provided.
LiteratureWitte B, Sparla P (2015) Vermessungskunde und Grundlagen der Statistik für das Bauwesen. 8. Aufl., Wichmann Verlag (in German)

Uren J, Price WF (2010) Surveying for Engineers. Palgrave Macmillan.
101-0414-AALTransport Planning (Transportation I)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe lecture course discusses the basic concepts, approaches and methods of transport planning in both their theoretical and practical contexts.
ObjectiveThe course introduces the basic theories and methods of transport planning.
ContentBasic theoretical links between transport, space and economic development; basic terminology; measurement and observation of travel behaviour; methods of the four stage approach; cost-benefit analysis.
LiteratureOrtuzar, J. de D. and L. Willumsen (2011) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.
103-0153-AALCartography II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RL. Hurni
AbstractTheory and mathematical basics of the cartographic visualisation of attributed geo-objects for static and interactive maps (with exercises).
ObjectiveThe course offers first computer graphics and mathematical basics and concepts of cartography. The accompanying exercises introduce further cartographic and GIS software, programming libraries for cartographic visualisation purposes. It is shown how web browsers, text editors and scripting languages can be used to develop efficient tools for cartographic data processing, design and visualisation.
ContentTopics like cartographic workflow, data capturing, data sources and legal aspects and Web map technologies:
- Introduction to QGIS, ArcGIS and OCAD
- Data sets, data types and data formats
- Analytical and visualisation processes in cartography
- Colour management and pre-press processes
- Web maps using HTML, CSS, JavaScript, SVG and Canvas 2D
- Interaction with diagrams and maps
- Libraries and APIs for cartographic applications
Lecture notesA specific programme for students with "additional requirements" will be provided. Please contact the supervisors.
LiteratureLinks to references and other materials will be provided by the supervisors.
103-0184-AALHigher Geodesy
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Rothacher
AbstractModern methods of Higher Geodesy. Basics of Shape of the Earth: Geoid determination and deflection of the vertical. Introduction into the most important topics: Satellite Geodesy and Navigation; Physical Geodesy and gravity field of the Earth; Astronomical Geodesy and Positioning; Mathematical Geodesy and basics of Geodynamics. Reference systems and applications in National and Global Geomatics.
ObjectiveOverview over the entire spectrum of Higher Geodesy
ContentActual methods of Higher Geodesy. Basics of Shape of the Earth: Geoid determination and deflection of the vertical. Introduction into the most important topics: Satellite Geodesy (GPS) and Navigation; Physical Geodesy and gravity field of the Earth; Astronomical Geodesy and Positioning; Mathematical Geodesy and basics of Geodynamics. Reference systems and applications in National and Global Geomatics.
Lecture notesRothacher, M.: Höhere Geodäsie (deutsch)
103-0214-AALCartography Fundamentals
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RL. Hurni
AbstractBasic knowledge about communication with spatial information by using plans and maps, about the most important design rules and production methods for map graphics.
ObjectiveAcquire basic knowhow about communication with spatial information by using plans and maps, about the most important design rules and production methods for map graphics. Ability to assess existing products with respect to their content-related and design quality. Ability to design proper plans and well designed legends for basic maps.
ContentDefinitions "map" and "cartography"
Map types
Current tasks and situation of cartography
Map history
Spatial reference systems
Map projections
Map concepts and workflow planning
Map design
Topographic maps
Analogous and digital map production technology
Prepress technology
Printing technology
Map critics
Lecture notesA specific programme for students with "additional requirements" will be provided. Please contact the supervisors.
LiteratureLinks to references and other materials will be provided by the supervisors.
103-0233-AALGIS Basics
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RM. Raubal
AbstractFundamentals in geo information technologies: database principles, including modeling of spatial information, geometric and semantic models, topology and metrics;
ObjectiveKnow the fundamentals in geo information technologies for the realization, application and operation of geographic information systems in engineering projects.
ContentModellierung von raumbezogenen Informationen
Geometrische und semantische Modelle
Topologie und Metrik
Raster und Vektormodelle
Datenbanken
Anwendungsbeispiele
LiteratureWorboys, M., & Duckham, M. (2004). GIS - A Computing Perspective (2nd Edition ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
O'Sullivan, D., & Unwin, D. (2010). Geographic Information Analysis (second ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley.
Bill, R. (2016). Grundlagen der Geo-Informationssysteme (6. Auflage ed.): Wichmann.
103-0234-AALGIS II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Raubal
AbstractAdvanced geoinformation technologies: geodatabases advanced; system architectures; mobile GIS; user interfaces; fields and interpolation; data quality, uncertainty, metadata; temporal aspects in GIS.
ObjectiveKnowing advanced topics of geoinformation technologies for the realization, application and operation of geographic information systems in engineering projects.
LiteratureWorboys, M., & Duckham, M. (2004). GIS - A Computing Perspective (2nd Edition ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
103-0253-AALParameter Estimation
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits4RE. Brockmann
AbstractThis course provides basic knowledge on parameter estimation and data processing. The necessary mathematical and statistical methods are developed and are applied to actual examples in geomatics.
ObjectiveThe students are capable of analysing measurements with appropriate methods. They can optimally extract model parameters from real measurements and are able to analyse and to retrieve additional information from data series. They understand the underlying algorithms of different geodetic analysis tools and processing methods.
103-0254-AALPhotogrammetry
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RK. Schindler
AbstractThe class conveys the basics of photogrammetry. It shall equip students with basic knowledge of the principles, methods and applications of image-based measurement.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the principles, methods and possible applications of photogrammetry. The course also forms the basis for more in-depth studies and self-reliant photogrammetric project work in further photogrammetry courses.
ContentFundamental concepts of photogrammetry, its products and applications: the principle of image-based measurement; digital aerial cameras and related sensors; projective geometry; mathematical modeling, calibration and orientation of cameras; photogrammetric 3D reconstruction and stereoscopy; digital photogrammetric workstations; recording geometry and flight planning
Lecture notesPhotogrammetry - Basics (slides on the web)
Exercise material (on the web)
Literature- Kraus, K.: Photogrammetrie, Band 1: Geometrische Informationen aus Photographien und Laserscanneraufnahmen, mit Beiträgen von Peter Waldhäusl, Walter de Gruyter Verlag, Berlin, 7th edition
- Kraus, K.: Photogrammetrie, Band 2: Verfeinerte Methoden und Anwendungen, mit Beiträgen von J. Jansa und H. Kager, Walter de Gruyter Verlag, Berlin, 3rd edition
- Thomas Luhmann: Nahbereichsphotogrammetrie. Grundlagen, Methoden und Anwendungen, H. Wichmann Verlag, Karlsruhe, 2nd edition 2003
- Richard Hartley and Andrew Zisserman: Multiple View Geometry, Cambridge University Press; 2nd edition 2004
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: knowledge of physics, linear algebra and analytical geometry, calculus, least-squares adjustment and statistics, basic programming skills.
103-0255-AALGeodata Analysis
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-2 credits4RM. Raubal
AbstractThe course deals with advanced methods in spatial data analysis.
Objective- Understanding the theoretical principles in spatial data analysis.
- Understanding and using methods for spatial data analysis.
- Detecting common sources of errors in spatial data analysis.
- Advanced practical knowledge in using appropriate GIS-tools.
ContentThe course deals with advanced methods in spatial data analysis in theory as well as in practical exercises.
103-0274-AALImage Processing
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RJ. D. Wegner
AbstractThe objective of this lecture is to introduce the basic concepts of image formation and explain the basic methods of signal and image processing.
ObjectiveUnderstanding core methods and algorithms in image processing and computer vision and the underlying signal processing foundations.
Applying image processing algorithms to relevant problems in photogrammetry and remote sensing.
ContentThe following topics will be covered in the course:
- Properties of digital images
- Signal processing/Sampling
- Image enhancement
- Image restoration: Spatial domain
- Image restoration: Fourier domain
- Color/Demosaicing
- Image compression
- Feature extraction
- Texture analysis
- Image segmentation
Lecture notesA script will be provided as PDF files on the lecture website.
LiteratureWe suggest the following textbooks for further reading:

Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods
Digital Image Processing
Prentice Hall International, 2008
ISBN: 013168728X

Rafael C. Gonzalez, Steven L. Eddins, Richard E. Woods:
Digital Image Processing Using MATLAB
Prentice Hall, 2003
ISBN: 0130085197
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is accompanied by programming assignments, that need to be completed in order to pass the course.
103-0325-AALPlanning II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-6 credits13RE. Derungs
AbstractThe lecture imparts methodological and instrumental fundamentals for spatial planning and will be exemplified by exploring Zurich city quarters.
ObjectiveSpatial planning is concerned with the foresighted design of the built and un-built environment. Starting points are spatially relevant problems that need to be explored, clarified and solved. The cornerstone of the course is formed by an independent exploration by the student of Zurich city quarters that involve investigating specific spatially relevant conditions, recognizing regularities and relevant problems.
ContentThe self-study course compromises the following readings:
Chapters of
- Lynch, Kevin: «The Image of the City»
- Alexander, Christopher et al.: «A Pattern Language»
- Mikoleit, Anne and Pürckhauer, Moritz: «Urban Code»

and
SIDAIA - Spatial and Infrastructure Development: an Integrated Approach.

The graded semester performance comprises a condensed paper to be written by the student reflecting both the literature read as well as exemplarily applying the knowledge gained from the literature by independently exploring the two city quarters.
Lecture notescf. content
Literaturecf. content
252-0846-AALComputer Science II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RF. Friedrich Wicker, H. Lehner
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms amd
- the knowledge of relational databases and
When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss the paradigm of object oriented programming, typical data structures and algorithms and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.
More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modelling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

T. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest, C. Stein, Introduction to Algorithms , 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).
406-0141-AALLinear Algebra
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RM. Akka Ginosar
AbstractIntroduction to Linear Algebra and Numerical Analysis for Engineers. The contents of the course are covered in the book "Introduction to Linear Algebra" by Gilbert Strang (SIAM, 2003). MATLAB is used as a tool to formulate and implement numerical algorithms.
ObjectiveTo acquire basic knowledge of Linear Algebra and of a few fundamental numerical techniques. The course is meant to
hone analytic and algorithmic skills.
Content1. Vectors and vector spaces
2. Solving linear systems of equations (Gaussian elimination)
3. Orthogonality
4. Determinants
5. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors
6. Linear transformations
7. Numerical linear algebra in MATLAB
8. (Piecewise) polynomial interpolation
9. Splines
LiteratureG. Strang, "Introduction to linear algebra", Third edition, 2003,
ISBN 0-9614088-9-8, Link

T. Sauer. "Numerical analysis", Addison-Wesley 2006
406-0242-AALAnalysis II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-7 credits15RM. Akveld
AbstractMathematical tools of an engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems, mathematical formulation of problems in science and engineering. Basic mathematical knowledge of an engineer
ContentMulti variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
Literature- James Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole
- William L. Briggs / Lyle Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education (Chapters 10 - 14)
406-0243-AALAnalysis I and II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-14 credits30RM. Akveld
AbstractMathematical tools for the engineer
ObjectiveMathematics as a tool to solve engineering problems. Mathematical formulation of technical and scientific problems. Basic mathematical knowledge for engineers.
ContentShort introduction to mathematical logic.
Complex numbers.
Calculus for functions of one variable with applications.
Simple types of ordinary differential equations.
Simple Mathematical models in engineering.

Multi variable calculus: gradient, directional derivative, chain rule, Taylor expansion. Multiple integrals: coordinate transformations, path integrals, integrals over surfaces, divergence theorem, applications in physics.
LiteratureTextbooks in English:
- J. Stewart: Calculus, Cengage Learning, 2009, ISBN 978-0-538-73365-6
- J. Stewart: Multivariable Calculus, Thomson Brooks/Cole (e.g. Appendix G on complex numbers)
- V. I. Smirnov: A course of higher mathematics. Vol. II. Advanced calculus
- W. L. Briggs, L. Cochran: Calculus: Early Transcendentals: International Edition, Pearson Education
Textbooks in German:
- M. Akveld, R. Sperb: Analysis I, vdf
- M. Akveld, R. Sperb: Analysis II, vdf
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler, Vieweg Verlag
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure 2, Vieweg Verlag
406-0603-AALStochastics (Probability and Statistics)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-4 credits9RM. Kalisch
AbstractIntroduction to basic methods and fundamental concepts of statistics and
probability theory for non-mathematicians. The concepts are presented on
the basis of some descriptive examples. The course will be based on the
book "Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et.al. and on the
book "Introductory Statistics with R" by P. Dalgaard.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to build a solid fundament in probability
and statistics. The student should understand some fundamental concepts and
be able to apply these concepts to applications in the real
world. Furthermore, the student should have a basic knowledge of the
statistical programming language "R". The main topics of the course are:
- Introduction to probability
- Common distributions
- Binomialtest
- z-Test, t-Test
- Regression
ContentFrom "Statistics for research":
Ch 1: The Role of Statistics
Ch 2: Populations, Samples, and Probability Distributions
Ch 3: Binomial Distributions
Ch 6: Sampling Distribution of Averages
Ch 7: Normal Distributions
Ch 8: Student's t Distribution
Ch 9: Distributions of Two Variables [Regression]

From "Introductory Statistics with R":
Ch 1: Basics
Ch 2: Probability and distributions
Ch 3: Descriptive statistics and tables
Ch 4: One- and two-sample tests
Ch 5: Regression and correlation
Literature"Statistics for research" by S. Dowdy et. al. (3rd
edition); Print ISBN: 9780471267355; Online ISBN: 9780471477433; DOI:
10.1002/0471477435;
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link

"Introductory Statistics with R" by Peter Dalgaard; ISBN
978-0-387-79053-4; DOI: 10.1007/978-0-387-79054-1
From within the ETH, this book is freely available online under:
Link
406-0062-AALPhysics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the concepts and tools in physics: mechanics of point-like and rigid bodies, elasticity theory, elements of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, periodic motion and mechanical waves.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve them.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts in mechanics.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (without: 6-5, 6-6, 6-8), 7, 8 (without 8-9), 9, 10 (without 10-10), 11 (without 11-7), 13 (without 13-13, 13-14), 14 (without 14-6), 15 (without 15-3, 15-5)
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 1: Mechanik und Thermodynamik
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2002, 544 S, ca.: Fr. 68.-
406-0063-AALPhysics II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics. The Chapters treated are Magnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts used in the theory of heat and electricity.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
17 (without 17-5, 17-10), 18 (without 18-5, 18-6, 18-7), 19, 20 (without 20-7, 20-8, 20-9, 20-10, 20-11), 21 (without 21-12), 23, 25 (without 25-9, 25-10), 26 (without 26-4, 26-5, 26-7), 27, 28 (without 28-4, 28-5, 28-8. 28-9, 28-10), 29 (without 29-5, 29-8), 32 (without 32-8), 33 (without 33-4, 33-5, 33-9, 33-10), 34 (without 34-4, 34-6, 34-7), 35 (without 35-2, 35-3, 35-9, 35-11, 35-12, 35-13).
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Verlag Wiley-VCH, 2003, Fr. 77.-
103-0313-AALSpatial Planning and Landscape Development
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-5 credits11RS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractThe lecture introduce into the main-features of spatial planning. Attended will be the themes planning as a national responsibility, instruments of spatial planning, techniques for problem-solutions in spatial planning and the swiss concept for regional planning.
Objective- To get to know the interaction between the community and our living space and their resulting conflicts.
- Link theory and practice in spatial planning.
- To get to know instruments and facilities to process problems in spatial planning.