Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Mechanical Engineering Bachelor Information
6. Semester
Focus Specialization
Energy, Flows and Processes
Focus Coordinator: Prof. Christoph Müller
In order to achieve the required 20 credit points for the Focus Specialization Energy, Flows and Processes you need to choose at least 2 core courses (W+) (HS/FS) and at least 2 of the elective courses (HS/FS), according to the presentation of the Focus Specialisation (see Link). One course can be selected among all the courses offered by D-MAVT (Bachelors and Masters).
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0206-00LEnergy Systems and Power EngineeringW+4 credits2V + 2UR. S. Abhari, A. Steinfeld
AbstractIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
ObjectiveIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
ContentWorld primary energy resources and use: fossil fuels, renewable energies, nuclear energy; present situation, trends, and future developments. Sustainable energy system and environmental impact of energy conversion and use: energy, economy and society. Electric power and the electricity economy worldwide and in Switzerland; production, consumption, alternatives. The electric power distribution system. Renewable energy and power: available techniques and their potential. Cost of electricity. Conventional power plants and their cycles; state-of-the-art and advanced cycles. Combined cycles and cogeneration; environmental benefits. Solar thermal; concentrated solar power; solar photovoltaics. Fuel cells: characteristics, fuel reforming and combined cycles.
Lecture notesVorlesungsunterlagen werden verteilt
151-0208-00LComputational Methods for Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer ProblemsW+4 credits4GD. W. Meyer-Massetti
AbstractNumerical methods for the solution of flow, heat & mass transfer problems are presented and illustrated by analytical & computer exercises.
ObjectiveKnowledge of and practical experience with discretization and solution methods for computational fluid dynamics and heat and mass transfer problems
Content- Introduction with application examples, steps to a numerical solution
- Classification of PDEs, application examples
- Finite differences
- Finite volumes
- Method of weighted residuals, spectral methods, finite elements
- Stability analysis, consistency, convergence
- Numerical solution methods, linear solvers
The learning materials are illustrated with practical examples.
Lecture notesSlides to be completed during the lecture will be handed out.
LiteratureReferences are provided during the lecture. Notes in close agreement with the lecture material are available (in German).
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and programming (lecture: "Models, Algorithms and Data: Introduction to Computing")
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based ResourcesW4 credits3GM. Mazzotti, A. Bardow, P. Eckle, N. Gruber, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
AbstractCarbon-based resources (coal, oil, gas): origin, production, processing, resource economics. Climate change: science, policies. CCS systems: CO2 capture in power/industrial plants, CO2 transport and storage. Besides technical details, economical, legal and societal aspects are considered (e.g. electricity markets, barriers to deployment).
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to introduce carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far and the current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing and economics of carbon-based resources, and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with important technical and non-technical issues related to use of carbon resources, climate change, and CCS as a transitional mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion. At the end of the semester a group project is planned.
ContentBoth the Swiss and the European energy system face a number of significant challenges over the coming decades. The major concerns are the security and economy of energy supply and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels will continue to satisfy the largest part of the energy demand in the medium term for Europe, and they could become part of the Swiss energy portfolio due to the planned phase out of nuclear power. Carbon capture and storage is considered an important option for the decarbonization of the power sector and it is the only way to reduce emissions in CO2 intensive industrial plants (e.g. cement- and steel production).
Building on the previously offered class "Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS)", we have added two specific topics: 1) the industry of carbon-based resources, i.e. what is upstream of the CCS value chain, and 2) the science of climate change, i.e. why and how CO2 emissions are a problem.
The course is devided into four parts:
I) The first part will be dedicated to the origin, production, and processing of conventional as well as of unconventional carbon-based resources.
II) The second part will comprise two lectures from experts in the field of climate change sciences and resource economics.
III) The third part will explain the technical details of CO2 capture (current and future options) as well as of CO2 storage and utilization options, taking again also economical, legal, and sociatel aspects into consideration.
IV) The fourth part will comprise two lectures from industry experts, one with focus on electricity markets, the other on the experiences made with CCS technologies in the industry.
Throughout the class, time will be allocated to work on a number of tasks related to the theory, individually, in groups, or in plenum. Moreover, the students will apply the theoretical knowledge acquired during the course in a case study covering all the topics.
Lecture notesPower Point slides and distributed handouts
LiteratureIPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018.
Link

IPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014. Link

IPCC Special Report on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, 2005. Link

The Global Status of CCS: 2014. Published by the Global CCS Institute, Nov 2014.
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
151-0946-00LMacromolecular Engineering: Networks and GelsW4 credits4GM. Tibbitt
AbstractThis course will provide an introduction to the design and physics of soft matter with a focus on polymer networks and hydrogels. The course will integrate fundamental aspects of polymer physics, engineering of soft materials, mechanics of viscoelastic materials, applications of networks and gels in biomedical applications including tissue engineering, 3D printing, and drug delivery.
ObjectiveThe main learning objectives of this course are: 1. Identify the key characteristics of soft matter and the properties of ideal and non-ideal macromolecules. 2. Calculate the physical properties of polymers in solution. 3. Predict macroscale properties of polymer networks and gels based on constituent chemical structure and topology. 4. Design networks and gels for industrial and biomedical applications. 5. Read and evaluate research papers on recent research on networks and gels and communicate the content orally to a multidisciplinary audience.
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts.
LiteraturePolymer Physics by M. Rubinstein and R.H. Colby; samplings from other texts.
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I+II, Thermodynamics I+II
151-0966-00LIntroduction to Quantum Mechanics for EngineersW4 credits2V + 2UD. J. Norris
AbstractThis course provides fundamental knowledge in the principles of quantum mechanics and connects it to applications in engineering.
ObjectiveTo work effectively in many areas of modern engineering, such as renewable energy and nanotechnology, students must possess a basic understanding of quantum mechanics. The aim of this course is to provide this knowledge while making connections to applications of relevancy to engineers. After completing this course, students will understand the basic postulates of quantum mechanics and be able to apply mathematical methods for solving various problems including atoms, molecules, and solids. Additional examples from engineering disciplines will also be integrated.
ContentFundamentals of Quantum Mechanics
- Historical Perspective
- Schrödinger Equation
- Postulates of Quantum Mechanics
- Operators
- Harmonic Oscillator
- Hydrogen atom
- Multielectron Atoms
- Crystalline Systems
- Spectroscopy
- Approximation Methods
- Applications in Engineering
Lecture notesClass Notes and Handouts
LiteratureText: David J. Griffiths and Darrell F. Schroeter, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, 3rd Edition, Cambridge University Press.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis III, Mechanics III, Physics I, Linear Algebra II
Mechatronics
Focus Coordinator: Prof. Marco Hutter
To achieve the 20 credits for Focus Specialization Mechatronics, 151-0640-00L Studies on Mechatronics is compulsory.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0640-00LStudies on Mechatronics
The supervising professors can be selected in myStudies during registration of the course.
For exceptions please contact the focus coordinator and Link.
This course is not available to incoming exchange students.
O5 credits11ASupervisors
AbstractOverview of Mechatronics topics and study subjects. Identification of minimum 10 pertinent refereed articles or works in the literature in consultation with supervisor or instructor. After 4 weeks, submission of a 2-page proposal outlining the value, state-of-the art and study plan based on these articles. After feedback on the substance and technical writing by the instructor, project commences.
ObjectiveThe goal of this class is to familiarize the students with this fascinating but rapidly evolving engineering discipline. The students learn to find, read and critically evaluate the pertinent literature and methods through in depth studying, presenting, debating of and writing about selected topics or case studies addressing mechatronics engineering.
ContentOverview of Mechatronics topics and study subjects. Identification of minimum ten pertinent refereed articles or works in the literature in consultation with supervisor orinstructor. After four weeks, submission of a 2-page proposal outlining the value, state-of-the art and study plan based on these articles. After detailed feedback on the substance and technical writing on the proposal by the instructor, project commences. Three to four weeks prior to the end of the semester, a 15 minute oral progress report (presentation) is given by the student that is critiqued by the instructor with detailed comments on substance and effectiveness of lecture and response on questions from audience. At the last day of the semester the student submits a written report that is no longer than 10-pages text following the format of a representative journal article. Throughout the semester the student attends and actively participates in the interactive class lectures given in the form of seminars and debates with active question and answer sessions inviting student and instructor participation.
LiteratureWill be available.
Prerequisites / NoticeLanguage: English or German - depending on the lecturer.
151-0206-00LEnergy Systems and Power EngineeringW4 credits2V + 2UR. S. Abhari, A. Steinfeld
AbstractIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
ObjectiveIntroductory first course for the specialization in ENERGY. The course provides an overall view of the energy field and pertinent global problems, reviews some of the thermodynamic basics in energy conversion, and presents the state-of-the-art technology for power generation and fuel processing.
ContentWorld primary energy resources and use: fossil fuels, renewable energies, nuclear energy; present situation, trends, and future developments. Sustainable energy system and environmental impact of energy conversion and use: energy, economy and society. Electric power and the electricity economy worldwide and in Switzerland; production, consumption, alternatives. The electric power distribution system. Renewable energy and power: available techniques and their potential. Cost of electricity. Conventional power plants and their cycles; state-of-the-art and advanced cycles. Combined cycles and cogeneration; environmental benefits. Solar thermal; concentrated solar power; solar photovoltaics. Fuel cells: characteristics, fuel reforming and combined cycles.
Lecture notesVorlesungsunterlagen werden verteilt
151-0516-00LNon-smooth Dynamics
Diese Lerneinheit wird zum letzten Mal im FS21 angeboten.
W5 credits5GC. Glocker
AbstractInequality problems in dynamics, in particular friction and impact problems with discontinuities in velocity and acceleration. Mechanical models of unilateral contacts, friction, sprag clutches, pre-stressed springs. Formulation by set-valued maps as linear complementarity problems. Numerical time integration of the combined friction impact contact problem.
ObjectiveThe lecture provides the students an introduction to modern methods for inequality problems in dynamics. The contents of the lecture are fitted to frictional contact problems in mechanics, but can be transferred to a large class of inequality problems in technical sciences. The purpose of the lecture is to acquaint the students with a consistent generalization of classical mechanics towards systems with discontinuities, and to make them familiar with inequalities treated as set-valued constitutive laws.
Content1. Kinematik: Drehung, Geschwindigkeit, Beschleunigung, virtuelle Verschiebung.
2. Aufbau der Mechanik: Definition der Kraft, virtuelle Arbeit, innere und äussere Kräfte, Wechselwirkungsprinzip, Erstarrungsprinzip, mathematische Form des Freischneidens, Definition der idealen Bindung.
3. Starre Körper: Variationelle Form der Gleichgewichtsbedingungen, Systeme starrer Körper, Übergang auf Minimalkoordinaten.
4. Einfache generalisierte Kräfte: Generalisierte Kraftrichtungen, Kinematik der Kraftelemente, Kraftgesetze, Parallel- und Reihenschaltung.
5. Darstellung mengenwertiger Kraftgesetze: Normalkegel, proximale Punkte, exakte Regularisierung. Anwendung auf einseitige Kontakte und Coulomb-Reibgesetze.
6. Stossfreie und stossbehaftete Bewegung: Bewegungsgleichung, Stossgleichung, Newton-Stossgesetze, Diskussion von Mehrfachstössen, Kane's Paradoxon.
7. Numerische Behandlung: Lineares Komplementaritätsproblem (LCP), Zeitdiskretisierung nach Moreau, Kontaktproblem in lokalen Koordinaten als LCP.
Lecture notesEs gibt kein Vorlesungsskript. Den Studierenden wird empfohlen, eine eigene Mitschrift der Vorlesung anzufertigen. Ein Katalog mit Übungsaufgaben und den zugehörigen Musterlösungen wird ausgegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeKinematik und Statik & Dynamics
151-0540-00LExperimental MechanicsW4 credits2V + 1UJ. Dual, T. Brack
Abstract1. General aspects like transfer functions, vibrations, modal analysis, statistics, digital signal processing, phase locked loop, 2. Optical methods 3. Piezoelectricity 4. Electromagnetic excitation and detection 5. Capacitive Detection
ObjectiveUnderstanding, quantitative modelling and practical application of experimental methods for producing and measuring mechanical quantities (motion, deformation, stresses,..)
Content1. General Aspects: Measurement chain, transfer functions, vibrations and waves in continuous systems, modal analysis, statistics, digital signal analysis, phase locked loop. 2. Optical methods ( acousto optic modulation, interferometry, holography, photoelasticity, shadow optics, Moire methods ) 3. Piezoelectric materials: basic equations, applications, accelerometer ) 4. Electomagnetic excitation and detection, 5. Capacitive detection
Practical training and homeworks
Lecture notesno
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Mechanics I to III, Physics, Elektrotechnik
151-0630-00LNanorobotics Information W4 credits2V + 1US. Pané Vidal
AbstractNanorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that includes topics from nanotechnology and robotics. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field. These topics include basic principles of nanorobotics, building parts for nanorobotic systems, powering and locomotion of nanorobots, manipulation, assembly and sensing using nanorobots, molecular motors, and nanorobotics for nanomedicine.
151-0641-00LIntroduction to Robotics and Mechatronics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 45.

Enrollment is only valid through registration on the MSRL website (Link). Registrations per e-mail is no longer accepted!
W4 credits2V + 2UB. Nelson, N. Shamsudhin
AbstractThe aim of this lecture is to expose students to the fundamentals of mechatronic and robotic systems. Over the course of these lectures, topics will include how to interface a computer with the real world, different types of sensors and their use, different types of actuators and their use.
ObjectiveAn ever-increasing number of mechatronic systems are finding their way into our daily lives. Mechatronic systems synergistically combine computer science, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. Robotics systems can be viewed as a subset of mechatronics that focuses on sophisticated control of moving devices.

The aim of this course is to practically and theoretically expose students to the fundamentals of mechatronic and robotic systems. Over the course of the semester, the lecture topics will include an overview of robotics, an introduction to different types of sensors and their use, the programming of microcontrollers and interfacing these embedded computers with the real world, signal filtering and processing, an introduction to different types of actuators and their use, an overview of computer vision, and forward and inverse kinematics. Throughout the course, students will periodically attend laboratory sessions and implement lessons learned during lectures on real mechatronic systems. By the end of the course, you will be able to independently choose, design and integrate these different building blocks into a working mechatronic system.
ContentThe course consists of weekly lectures and lab sessions. The weekly topics are the following:
0. Course Introduction
1. C Programming
2. Sensors
3. Data Acquisition
4. Signal Processing
5. Digital Filtering
6. Actuators
7. Computer Vision and Kinematics
8. Modeling and Control
9. Review and Outlook

The lecture schedule can be found on our course page on the MSRL website (Link)
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students are expected to be familiar with C programming.
151-1224-00LOil-Hydraulics and PneumaticsW4 credits2V + 2UJ.  Lodewyks
AbstractIntroduction to the physical and technical basics of oilhydraulic and pneumatic systems and their components as pumps, motors, cylinders and control valves, with emphasis on servo- and proportional techniques and feedback- controlled drives. In parallel an overview on application examples will be given
ObjectiveThe student
- can interpret and explain the function of an oilhydraulic or pneumatic system and can create basic circuit concepts
- can discribe the architecture and function of needed components and can select and design them to desired properties
- can simulate the dynamical behaviour of a servohydraulic cylinder- drive and can design an optimal state-feedback-control with observer
ContentSignificans of hydraulic and pneumatic systems, general definitions and typical application examples.
Review of important fluid-mechanical principles as compressibility, flow through orifices and friction losses in line-systems.
Components of hydraulic and pneumatic systems as pumps, motors, cylinders, control valves for direction, pressure and flow, proportional- and servo-valves, their function and structural composition.
Basic circuit concepts of hydraulic and pneumatic control systems.
Dynamical behaviour and state-feedback-control of servohydraulic and -pneumatic drives.
Exercices
Design of a oilhydraulic drive-system
Measurement of the flow characteristic of an orifice, a pressure valve and a pump.
Simulation and experimental investigation of a state-feedback-controlled servo-cylinder-drive.
Lecture notesAutography Oelhydraulik
Skript Zustandsregelung eines Servohydraulischen Zylinderantriebes
Skript Elemente einer Druckluftversorgung
Skript Modellierung eines Servopneumatischen Zylinderantriebes
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is suitable for students as of 5th semester. In FS2021 the lectures will take place until Easter only digital. All required informations and documents are available on Moodle.
151-0135-00LAdditional Case for the Focus Specialization Restricted registration - show details
Exclusive for D-MAVT Bachelor's students in Focus Specialization.
For enrollment, please contact the D-MAVT Student Administration.
W1 credit2AProfessors
AbstractIndependent studies on a defined field within the selected Focus Specialization.
ObjectiveIndependent studies on a defined field within the selected Focus Specialization.
227-0518-10LDesign and Control of Electric MachinesW6 credits4GD. Bortis
AbstractThis course covers modeling and control concepts of modern drive systems and provides a deeper understanding of the dynamic operation of electric machines. Different aspects arising in the design of electric drive systems are investigated. The exercises are used to consolidate the concepts discussed.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to convey knowledge on control strategies of different types of electric machines and on design principles of variable speed drive systems. A dynamic modeling of the electromechanical system is investigated, enabling the proper design of cascaded speed, torque/current controllers. Further objectives are the identification of machine parameters and a short insight into basic inverter circuits applied in advanced motor drive systems. Exercises are used to consolidate the presented theoretical concepts.
Content1. Introduction to variable speed motor drive systems consisting of:
- Electromechanical system
- Power electronic system
- Control system
- Measurement system

2. Control structures and strategies of DC Machine/Synchronous machine/Asynchronous machine/Brushless DC machine.
- Cascaded control
- U/f Control
- Slip Control
- Field-oriented control

3. Dynamic Operation of electric machines
- Dynamic modeling of electromechanical system
- Controller types and design
- Current/torque control
- Speed control (Voltage control / Flux weakening)

4. Power electronic inverter circuits in variable speed drive systems
- Voltage and current source inverter systems
- Basic operation and pulse width modulation

5. Identification of machine parameters

6. Design principles of variable speed motor drives systems
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Fundamentals of Electric Machines
Microsystems and Nanoscale Engineering
Focus Coordinator: Prof. Christofer Hierold
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0643-00LStudies on Micro and Nano Systems
This course is not available to incoming exchange students.
W+5 credits11ASupervisors
AbstractThe students get familiarized with the challenges of the fascinating and interdisciplinary field of Micro- and Nanosystems. They are introduced to the basics of independent non-experimental scientific research and are able to summarize and to present the results efficiently.
ObjectiveThe students get familiarized with the challenges of the fascinating and interdisciplinary field of Micro- and Nanosystems. They are introduced to the basics of independent non-experimental scientific research and are able to summarize and to present the results efficiently.
ContentStudents work independently on a study of selected topics in the field of Micro- and Nanosystems. They start with a selection of scientific papers, and continue with an independent iterature research. The results (e.g. state-of-the-art, methods) are evaluated with respect to predefined criteria. Then the results are presented in an oral presentation and summarized in a report, which takes the discussion of the presentation into account.
LiteratureLiterature will be provided
151-0060-00LThermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in NanotechnologyW4 credits2V + 2UT. Schutzius, D. Taylor
AbstractThe lecture deals with thermodynamics and transport phenomena in nano- and microscale systems. Typical areas of applications are microelectronics manufacturing and cooling, manufacturing of novel materials and coatings, surface technologies, wetting phenomena and related technologies, and micro- and nanosystems and devices.
ObjectiveThe student will acquire fundamental knowledge of interfacial and micro-nanoscale thermofluidics including electric field and light interaction with surfaces. Furthermore, the student will be exposed to a host of applications ranging from superhydrophobic surfaces and microelectronics cooling to solar energy, all of which will be discussed in the context of the course. The student will also judge state-of-the-art scientific research in these areas.
ContentThermodynamic aspects of intermolecular forces; Interfacial phenomena; Surface tension; Wettability and contact angle; Wettability of Micro/Nanoscale textured surfaces: superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity.

Physics of micro- and nanofluidics as well as heat and mass transport phenomena at the nanoscale.

Scientific communication and exposure to state-of-the-art scientific research in the areas of Nanotechnology and the Water-Energy Nexus.
Lecture notesyes
151-0172-00LMicrosystems II: Devices and Applications Information W6 credits3V + 3UC. Hierold, C. I. Roman
AbstractThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS). They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS), basic electronic circuits for sensors, RF-MEMS, chemical microsystems, BioMEMS and microfluidics, magnetic sensors and optical devices, and in particular to the concepts of Nanosystems (focus on carbon nanotubes), based on the respective state-of-research in the field. They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.

During the weekly 3 hour module on Mondays dedicated to Übungen the students will learn the basics of Comsol Multiphysics and utilize this software to simulate MEMS devices to understand their operation more deeply and optimize their designs.
ContentTransducer fundamentals and test structures
Pressure sensors and accelerometers
Resonators and gyroscopes
RF MEMS
Acoustic transducers and energy harvesters
Thermal transducers and energy harvesters
Optical and magnetic transducers
Chemical sensors and biosensors, microfluidics and bioMEMS
Nanosystem concepts
Basic electronic circuits for sensors and microsystems
Lecture notesHandouts (on-line)
151-0516-00LNon-smooth Dynamics
Diese Lerneinheit wird zum letzten Mal im FS21 angeboten.
W5 credits5GC. Glocker
AbstractInequality problems in dynamics, in particular friction and impact problems with discontinuities in velocity and acceleration. Mechanical models of unilateral contacts, friction, sprag clutches, pre-stressed springs. Formulation by set-valued maps as linear complementarity problems. Numerical time integration of the combined friction impact contact problem.
ObjectiveThe lecture provides the students an introduction to modern methods for inequality problems in dynamics. The contents of the lecture are fitted to frictional contact problems in mechanics, but can be transferred to a large class of inequality problems in technical sciences. The purpose of the lecture is to acquaint the students with a consistent generalization of classical mechanics towards systems with discontinuities, and to make them familiar with inequalities treated as set-valued constitutive laws.
Content1. Kinematik: Drehung, Geschwindigkeit, Beschleunigung, virtuelle Verschiebung.
2. Aufbau der Mechanik: Definition der Kraft, virtuelle Arbeit, innere und äussere Kräfte, Wechselwirkungsprinzip, Erstarrungsprinzip, mathematische Form des Freischneidens, Definition der idealen Bindung.
3. Starre Körper: Variationelle Form der Gleichgewichtsbedingungen, Systeme starrer Körper, Übergang auf Minimalkoordinaten.
4. Einfache generalisierte Kräfte: Generalisierte Kraftrichtungen, Kinematik der Kraftelemente, Kraftgesetze, Parallel- und Reihenschaltung.
5. Darstellung mengenwertiger Kraftgesetze: Normalkegel, proximale Punkte, exakte Regularisierung. Anwendung auf einseitige Kontakte und Coulomb-Reibgesetze.
6. Stossfreie und stossbehaftete Bewegung: Bewegungsgleichung, Stossgleichung, Newton-Stossgesetze, Diskussion von Mehrfachstössen, Kane's Paradoxon.
7. Numerische Behandlung: Lineares Komplementaritätsproblem (LCP), Zeitdiskretisierung nach Moreau, Kontaktproblem in lokalen Koordinaten als LCP.
Lecture notesEs gibt kein Vorlesungsskript. Den Studierenden wird empfohlen, eine eigene Mitschrift der Vorlesung anzufertigen. Ein Katalog mit Übungsaufgaben und den zugehörigen Musterlösungen wird ausgegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeKinematik und Statik & Dynamics
151-0540-00LExperimental MechanicsW4 credits2V + 1UJ. Dual, T. Brack
Abstract1. General aspects like transfer functions, vibrations, modal analysis, statistics, digital signal processing, phase locked loop, 2. Optical methods 3. Piezoelectricity 4. Electromagnetic excitation and detection 5. Capacitive Detection
ObjectiveUnderstanding, quantitative modelling and practical application of experimental methods for producing and measuring mechanical quantities (motion, deformation, stresses,..)
Content1. General Aspects: Measurement chain, transfer functions, vibrations and waves in continuous systems, modal analysis, statistics, digital signal analysis, phase locked loop. 2. Optical methods ( acousto optic modulation, interferometry, holography, photoelasticity, shadow optics, Moire methods ) 3. Piezoelectric materials: basic equations, applications, accelerometer ) 4. Electomagnetic excitation and detection, 5. Capacitive detection
Practical training and homeworks
Lecture notesno
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Mechanics I to III, Physics, Elektrotechnik
151-0622-00LMeasuring on the Nanometer ScaleW2 credits2GA. Stemmer
AbstractIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ObjectiveIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ContentConventional techniques to analyze nano structures using photons and electrons: light microscopy with dark field and differential interference contrast; scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Interferometric and other techniques to measure distances. Optical traps. Foundations of scanning probe microscopy: tunneling, atomic force, optical near-field. Interactions between specimen and probe. Current trends, including spectroscopy of material parameters.
Lecture notesSlides and recordings available via Moodle (registered participants only).
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