Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Micro- and Nanosystems Master Information
Core Courses
Recommended Core Courses
Devices and Systems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0172-00LMicrosystems II: Devices and Applications Information W6 credits3V + 3UC. Hierold, C. I. Roman
AbstractThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS). They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS), basic electronic circuits for sensors, RF-MEMS, chemical microsystems, BioMEMS and microfluidics, magnetic sensors and optical devices, and in particular to the concepts of Nanosystems (focus on carbon nanotubes), based on the respective state-of-research in the field. They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.

During the weekly 3 hour module on Mondays dedicated to Übungen the students will learn the basics of Comsol Multiphysics and utilize this software to simulate MEMS devices to understand their operation more deeply and optimize their designs.
ContentTransducer fundamentals and test structures
Pressure sensors and accelerometers
Resonators and gyroscopes
RF MEMS
Acoustic transducers and energy harvesters
Thermal transducers and energy harvesters
Optical and magnetic transducers
Chemical sensors and biosensors, microfluidics and bioMEMS
Nanosystem concepts
Basic electronic circuits for sensors and microsystems
Lecture notesHandouts (on-line)
227-0662-00LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2GV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
227-0662-10LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Project) Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits2AV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
Prerequisites / NoticeAdmission is conditional to passing 227-0662-00L Organic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics (Course)
Energy Conversion and Quantum Phenomena
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0060-00LThermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in NanotechnologyW4 credits2V + 2UT. Schutzius, D. Taylor
AbstractThe lecture deals with thermodynamics and transport phenomena in nano- and microscale systems. Typical areas of applications are microelectronics manufacturing and cooling, manufacturing of novel materials and coatings, surface technologies, wetting phenomena and related technologies, and micro- and nanosystems and devices.
ObjectiveThe student will acquire fundamental knowledge of interfacial and micro-nanoscale thermofluidics including electric field and light interaction with surfaces. Furthermore, the student will be exposed to a host of applications ranging from superhydrophobic surfaces and microelectronics cooling to solar energy, all of which will be discussed in the context of the course. The student will also judge state-of-the-art scientific research in these areas.
ContentThermodynamic aspects of intermolecular forces; Interfacial phenomena; Surface tension; Wettability and contact angle; Wettability of Micro/Nanoscale textured surfaces: superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity.

Physics of micro- and nanofluidics as well as heat and mass transport phenomena at the nanoscale.

Scientific communication and exposure to state-of-the-art scientific research in the areas of Nanotechnology and the Water-Energy Nexus.
Lecture notesyes
402-0468-15LNanomaterials for PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 1UR. Grange, R. Savo
AbstractThe lecture describes various nanomaterials (semiconductor, metal, dielectric, carbon-based...) for photonic applications (optoelectronics, plasmonics, ordered and disordered structures...). It starts with concepts of light-matter interactions, then the fabrication methods, the optical characterization techniques, the description of the properties and the state-of-the-art applications.
ObjectiveThe students will acquire theoretical and experimental knowledge about the different types of nanomaterials (semiconductors, metals, dielectric, carbon-based, ...) and their uses as building blocks for advanced applications in photonics (optoelectronics, plasmonics, photonic crystal, ...). Together with the exercises, the students will learn (1) to read, summarize and discuss scientific articles related to the lecture, (2) to estimate order of magnitudes with calculations using the theory seen during the lecture, (3) to prepare a short oral presentation and report about one topic related to the lecture, and (4) to imagine an original photonic device.
Content1. Introduction to nanomaterials for photonics
a. Classification of nanomaterials
b. Light-matter interaction at the nanoscale
c. Examples of nanophotonic devices

2. Wave physics for nanophotonics
a. Wavelength, wave equation, wave propagation
b. Dispersion relation
c. Interference
d. Scattering and absorption
e. Coherent and incoherent light

3. Analogies between photons and electrons
a. Quantum wave description
b. How to confine photons and electrons
c. Tunneling effects

4. Characterization of Nanomaterials
a. Optical microscopy: Bright and dark field, fluorescence, confocal, High resolution: PALM (STORM), STED
b. Light scattering techniques: DLS
c. Near field microscopy: SNOM
d. Electron microscopy: SEM, TEM
e. Scanning probe microscopy: STM, AFM
f. X-ray diffraction: XRD, EDS

5. Fabrication of nanomaterials
a. Top-down approach
b. Bottom-up approach

6. Plasmonics
a. What is a plasmon, Drude model
b. Surface plasmon and localized surface plasmon (sphere, rod, shell)
c. Theoretical models to calculate the radiated field: electrostatic approximation and Mie scattering
d. Fabrication of plasmonic structures: Chemical synthesis, Nanofabrication
e. Applications

7. Organic and inorganic nanomaterials
a. Organic quantum-confined structure: nanomers and quantum dots.
b. Carbon nanotubes: properties, bandgap description, fabrication
c. Graphene: motivation, fabrication, devices
d. Nanomarkers for biophotonics

8. Semiconductors
a. Crystalline structure, wave function
b. Quantum well: energy levels equation, confinement
c. Quantum wires, quantum dots
d. Optical properties related to quantum confinement
e. Example of effects: absorption, photoluminescence
f. Solid-state-lasers: edge emitting, surface emitting, quantum cascade

9. Photonic crystals
a. Analogy photonic and electronic crystal, in nature
b. 1D, 2D, 3D photonic crystal
c. Theoretical modelling: frequency and time domain technique
d. Features: band gap, local enhancement, superprism...

10. Nanocomposites
a. Effective medium regime
b. Metamaterials
c. Multiple scattering regime
d. Complex media: structural colour, random lasers, nonlinear disorder
Lecture notesSlides and book chapter will be available for downloading
LiteratureReferences will be given during the lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeBasics of solid-state physics (i.e. energy bands) can help
402-0596-00LElectronic Transport in NanostructuresW6 credits2V + 1UT. M. Ihn
AbstractThe lecture discusses modern topics in quantum transport through nanostructures including the underlying materials. Topics are: the quantum Hall effects with emphasis on the fractional quantum Hall effect, two-dimensional topological insulators, graphene and other 2D layered materials, quantum interferometers, quantum dot qubits for quantum information processing, decoherence of quantum states
ObjectiveStudents are able to understand modern experiments in the field of electronic transport in nanostructures. They can critically reflect published research in this field and explain it to an audience of physicists. Students know and understand the fundamental phenomena of electron transport in the quantum regime and their significance. They are able to apply their knowledge to practical experiments in a modern research lab.
Lecture notesThe lecture is based on the book:
T. Ihn, Semiconductor Nanostructures: Quantum States and Electronic Transport, ISBN 978-0-19-953442-5, Oxford University Press, 2010.
Prerequisites / NoticeA solid basis in quantum mechanics, electrostatics, quantum statistics and in solid state physics is required. Having passed the lecture Semiconductor Nanostructures (fall semester) may be advantageous, but is not required.

Students of the Master in Micro- and Nanosystems should at least have attended the lecture by David Norris, Introduction to quantum mechanics for engineers. They should also have passed the exam of the lecture Semiconductor Nanostructures.
529-0431-00LPhysical Chemistry III: Molecular Quantum Mechanics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits4GF. Merkt
AbstractPostulates of quantum mechanics, operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values, matrix representation of operators, particle in a box, tunneling, harmonic oscillator, molecular vibrations, angular momentum and spin, generalised Pauli principle, perturbation theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, Born-Oppenheimer approximation.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course in quantum mechanics. The course starts with an overview of the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and introduces the mathematical formalism. The postulates and theorems of quantum mechanics are discussed in the context of experimental and numerical determination of physical quantities. The course develops the tools necessary for the understanding and calculation of elementary quantum phenomena in atoms and molecules.
ContentPostulates and theorems of quantum mechanics: operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values. Linear motions: free particles, particle in a box, quantum mechanical tunneling, the harmonic oscillator and molecular vibrations. Angular momentum: electronic spin and orbital motion, molecular rotations. Electronic structure of atoms and molecules: the Pauli principle, angular momentum coupling, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Variational principle and perturbation theory. Discussion of bigger systems (solids, nano-structures).
Lecture notesA script written in German will be available. The script is, however, no replacement for personal notes during the lecture and does not cover all aspects discussed.
Modelling and Simulation
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-3632-00LComputational StatisticsW8 credits3V + 1UM. Mächler
AbstractWe discuss modern statistical methods for data analysis, including methods for data exploration, prediction and inference. We pay attention to algorithmic aspects, theoretical properties and practical considerations. The class is hands-on and methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
ObjectiveThe student obtains an overview of modern statistical methods for data analysis, including their algorithmic aspects and theoretical properties. The methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
ContentSee the class website
Prerequisites / NoticeAt least one semester of (basic) probability and statistics.

Programming experience is helpful but not required.
151-0116-10LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for Engineers II Information W4 credits4GP. Koumoutsakos, S. M. Martin
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
ObjectiveThe course will teach
- programming models and tools for multi and many-core architectures
- fundamental concepts of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences
ContentHigh Performance Computing:
- Advanced topics in shared-memory programming
- Advanced topics in MPI
- GPU architectures and CUDA programming

Uncertainty Quantification:
- Uncertainty quantification under parametric and non-parametric modeling uncertainty
- Bayesian inference with model class assessment
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation
Lecture notesLink
Class notes, handouts
Literature- Class notes
- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein
- CUDA by example, J. Sanders and E. Kandrot
- Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial, D. Sivia and J. Skilling
- An introduction to Bayesian Analysis - Theory and Methods, J. Gosh, N. Delampady and S. Tapas
- Bayesian Data Analysis, A. Gelman, J. Carlin, H. Stern, D. Dunson, A. Vehtari and D. Rubin
- Machine Learning: A Bayesian and Optimization Perspective, S. Theodorides
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be familiar with the content of High Performance Computing for Science and Engineering I (151-0107-20L)
Laboratory Course
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0620-00LEmbedded MEMS Lab
Number of participants limited to 20.
W5 credits3PC. Hierold, M. Haluska
AbstractPractical course: Students are introduced to the process steps required for the fabrication of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) and carry out the fabrication and testing steps in the clean rooms themselves. Additionally, they learn the requirements for working in clean rooms. Processing and characterization will be documented and analyzed in a final report.
ObjectiveStudents learn the individual process steps that are required to make a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System). Students carry out the process steps themselves in laboratories and clean rooms. Furthermore, participants become familiar with the special requirements (cleanliness, safety, operation of equipment and handling hazardous chemicals) of working in the clean rooms and laboratories. The entire production, processing, and characterization of the MEMS is documented and evaluated in a final report.
ContentWith guidance from a tutor, the individual silicon microsystem process steps that are required for the fabrication of an accelerometer are carried out:
- Photolithography, dry etching, wet etching, sacrificial layer etching, various cleaning procedures
- Packaging and electrical connection of a MEMS device
- Testing and characterization of the MEMS device
- Written documentation and evaluation of the entire production, processing and characterization
Lecture notesA document containing theory, background and practical course content is distributed in the informational meeting.
LiteratureThe document provides sufficient information for the participants to successfully participate in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipating students are required to attend all scheduled lectures and meetings of the course.

Participating students are required to provide proof that they have personal accident insurance prior to the start of the laboratory portion of the course.

This master's level course is limited to 20 students per semester for safety and efficiency reasons.
If there are more than 20 students registered, we regret to restrict access to this course by the following rules:

Priority 1: master students of the master's program in "Micro and Nanosystems"

Priority 2: master students of the master's program in "Mechanical Engineering" with a specialization in Microsystems and Nanoscale Engineering (MAVT-tutors Profs Dual, Hierold, Koumoutsakos, Nelson, Norris, Poulikakos, Pratsinis, Stemmer), who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 3: master students, who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 4: all other students (PhD, bachelor, master) with a background in silicon or microsystems process technology.

If there are more students in one of these priority groups than places available, we will decide with respect to (in following order) best achieved grade from 151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology, registration to this practicum at previous semester, and by drawing lots.
Students will be notified at the first lecture of the course (introductory lecture) as to whether they are able to participate.

The course is offered in autumn and spring semester.
Elective Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0534-00LAdvanced DynamicsW4 credits3V + 1UP. Tiso
AbstractLagrangian dynamics - Principle of virtual work and virtual power - holonomic and non holonomic contraints - 3D rigid body dynamics - equilibrium - linearization - stability - vibrations - frequency response
ObjectiveThis course provides the students of mechanical engineering with fundamental analytical mechanics for the study of complex mechanical systems .We introduce the powerful techniques of principle of virtual work and virtual power to systematically write the equation of motion of arbitrary systems subjected to holonomic and non-holonomic constraints. The linearisation around equilibrium states is then presented, together with the concept of linearised stability. Linearized models allow the study of small amplitude vibrations for unforced and forced systems. For this, we introduce the concept of vibration modes and frequencies, modal superposition and modal truncation. The case of the vibration of light damped systems is discussed. The kinematics and dynamics of 3D rigid bodies is also extensively treated.
Lecture notesLecture notes are produced in class and are downloadable right after each lecture.
LiteratureThe students will prepare their own notes. A copy of the lecture notes will be available.
Prerequisites / NoticeMechanics III or equivalent; Analysis I-II, or equivalent; Linear Algebra I-II, or equivalent.
151-0622-00LMeasuring on the Nanometer ScaleW2 credits2GA. Stemmer
AbstractIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ObjectiveIntroduction to theory and practical application of measuring techniques suitable for the nano domain.
ContentConventional techniques to analyze nano structures using photons and electrons: light microscopy with dark field and differential interference contrast; scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy. Interferometric and other techniques to measure distances. Optical traps. Foundations of scanning probe microscopy: tunneling, atomic force, optical near-field. Interactions between specimen and probe. Current trends, including spectroscopy of material parameters.
Lecture notesSlides and recordings available via Moodle (registered participants only).
151-0630-00LNanorobotics Information W4 credits2V + 1US. Pané Vidal
AbstractNanorobotics is an interdisciplinary field that includes topics from nanotechnology and robotics. The aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to expose students to the fundamental and essential aspects of this emerging field. These topics include basic principles of nanorobotics, building parts for nanorobotic systems, powering and locomotion of nanorobots, manipulation, assembly and sensing using nanorobots, molecular motors, and nanorobotics for nanomedicine.
151-0642-00LSeminar on Micro and NanosystemsZ0 credits1SC. Hierold
AbstractScientific presentations from the field of Micro- and Nanosystems
ObjectiveThe students will be informed about the latest news from the state-of-the-art in the field and will take the opportunity to start scientific and challenging discussions with the presenters.
ContentSelected and hot topics from Micro- and Nanosystems, progress reports from PhD projects.
151-0966-00LIntroduction to Quantum Mechanics for EngineersW4 credits2V + 2UD. J. Norris
AbstractThis course provides fundamental knowledge in the principles of quantum mechanics and connects it to applications in engineering.
ObjectiveTo work effectively in many areas of modern engineering, such as renewable energy and nanotechnology, students must possess a basic understanding of quantum mechanics. The aim of this course is to provide this knowledge while making connections to applications of relevancy to engineers. After completing this course, students will understand the basic postulates of quantum mechanics and be able to apply mathematical methods for solving various problems including atoms, molecules, and solids. Additional examples from engineering disciplines will also be integrated.
ContentFundamentals of Quantum Mechanics
- Historical Perspective
- Schrödinger Equation
- Postulates of Quantum Mechanics
- Operators
- Harmonic Oscillator
- Hydrogen atom
- Multielectron Atoms
- Crystalline Systems
- Spectroscopy
- Approximation Methods
- Applications in Engineering
Lecture notesClass Notes and Handouts
LiteratureText: David J. Griffiths and Darrell F. Schroeter, Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, 3rd Edition, Cambridge University Press.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis III, Mechanics III, Physics I, Linear Algebra II
227-0125-00LOptics and PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 2UJ. Leuthold
AbstractThis lecture covers both - the fundamentals of "Optics" such as e.g. "ray optics", "coherence", the "Planck law" or the "Einstein relations" but also the fundamentals of "Photonics" on the generation, processing, transmission and detection of photons.
ObjectiveA sound base for work in the field of optics and photonics will be given.
ContentChapter 1: Ray Optics
Chapter 2: Electromagnetic Optics
Chapter 3: Polarization
Chapter 4: Coherence and Interference
Chapter 5: Fourier Optics and Diffraction
Chapter 6: Guided Wave Optics
Chapter 7: Optical Fibers
Chapter 8: The Laser
Lecture notesLecture notes will be handed out.
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Electromagnetic Fields (Maxwell Equations) & Bachelor Lectures on Physics.
227-0159-00LSemiconductor Devices: Quantum Transport at the Nanoscale Information W6 credits2V + 2UM. Luisier, A. Emboras
AbstractThis class offers an introduction into quantum transport theory, a rigorous approach to electron transport at the nanoscale. It covers different topics such as bandstructure, Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms, and electron interactions with their environment. Matlab exercises accompany the lectures where students learn how to develop their own transport simulator.
ObjectiveThe continuous scaling of electronic devices has given rise to structures whose dimensions do not exceed a few atomic layers. At this size, electrons do not behave as particle any more, but as propagating waves and the classical representation of electron transport as the sum of drift-diffusion processes fails. The purpose of this class is to explore and understand the displacement of electrons through nanoscale device structures based on state-of-the-art quantum transport methods and to get familiar with the underlying equations by developing his own nanoelectronic device simulator.
ContentThe following topics will be addressed:
- Introduction to quantum transport modeling
- Bandstructure representation and effective mass approximation
- Open vs closed boundary conditions to the Schrödinger equation
- Comparison of the Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms as solution to the Schrödinger equation
- Self-consistent Schödinger-Poisson simulations
- Quantum transport simulations of resonant tunneling diodes and quantum well nano-transistors
- Top-of-the-barrier simulation approach to nano-transistor
- Electron interactions with their environment (phonon, roughness, impurity,...)
- Multi-band transport models
Lecture notesLecture slides are distributed every week and can be found at
Link
LiteratureRecommended textbook: "Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems", Supriyo Datta, Cambridge Studies in Semiconductor Physics and Microelectronic Engineering, 1997
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of semiconductor device physics and quantum mechanics
227-0303-00LAdvanced PhotonicsW6 credits2V + 2U + 1AA. Emboras, M. Burla, A. Dorodnyy
AbstractThe lecture gives a comprehensive insight into various types of nano-scale photonic devices, physical fundamentals of their operation, and an overview of the micro/nano-fabrication technologies. Following applications of nano-scale photonic structures are discussed in details: detectors, photovoltaic cells, atomic/ionic opto-electronic devices and integrated microwave photonics.
ObjectiveGeneral training in advanced photonic devices with an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of theory, fabrication, and characterization. Hands-on experience with photonic and optoelectronic device technologies and theory. The students will learn about the importance of advanced photonic devices in energy, communications, digital and neuromorphic computing applications.
ContentThe following topics will be addressed:
• Photovoltaics: basic thermodynamic principles and fundamental efficiency limitations, physics of semiconductor solar cell, overview of existing solar cell concepts and underlying physical phenomena.
• Micro/nano-fabrication technologies for advanced optoelectronic devices: introduction and device examples.
• Comprehensive insight into the physical mechanisms that govern ionic-atomic devices, present the techniques required to fabricate ultra-scaled nanostructures and show some applications in digital and neuromorphic computing.
• Introduction to microwave photonics (MWP), microwave photonic links, photonic techniques for microwave signal generation and processing.
Lecture notesThe presentation and the lecture notes will be provided every week.
Literature“Atomic/Ionic Devices”:
• Resistive Switching: From Fundamentals of Nanoionic Redox Processes to Memristive Device Applications, Daniele Ielmini and Rainer Waser, Wiley-VCH
• Electrochemical Methods: Fundamentals and Applications, A. Bard and L. Faulkner, John Willey & Sons, Inc.

“Photovoltaics”:
• Prof. Peter Wurfel: Physics of Solar Cells, Wiley

“Micro and nano Fabrication”:
• Prof. H. Gatzen, Prof. Volker Saile, Prof. Juerg Leuthold: Micro and Nano Fabrication, Springer

“Microwave Photonics”:
• D. M. Pozar, Microwave Engineering. J. Wiley & Sons, New York, 2005.
• M. Burla, Advanced integrated optical beam forming networks for broadband phased array antenna systems. Enschede, The Netherlands, 2013. DOI: 10.3990/1.9789036507295
• C.H. Cox, Analog optical links: theory and practice. Cambridge University Press, 2006.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of semiconductor physics, physics of the electromagnetic filed and thermodynamics.
227-0330-00LEnergy-Efficient Analog Circuits for IoT SystemsW6 credits2V + 2UT. Jang
AbstractWe are facing a new era of the Internet of things, similarly indicated as Industry 4.0, TSensors, Ubiquitous or The Fog. A miniaturized computer is the key to this innovation that senses, collects and processes information from objects. In this class, based on the recent publications, energy efficient analog IC techniques will be introduced which is the main challenge to reduce the battery size.
ObjectiveThis class introduces key analog building blocks such as energy harvester, frequency generator, data converter, sensor interface, power converter based on the recent publications for IoT systems including wearable electronics, bio-implantable devices, and environmental sensors.
ContentUltra-low power circuit design methodology and transistor characteristics; Circuit-level design techniques for amplifier, comparator, voltage reference, on-chip oscillator, switched capacitor; IP-level design techniques for energy harvester, data converter, energy harvester and power converters.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalog Integrated Circuits
227-0622-00LThermal Modeling: From Semiconductor to Medical Devices and Personalized Therapy PlanningW4 credits2V + 1UE. Neufeld, M. Luisier
AbstractThe course introduces computational techniques to model electromagnetic heating across many orders of magnitudes, from the atomic to the macroscopic scale. Both desired and undesired thermal effects will be covered, e.g. thermal cancer therapies based on tissue heating or Joule heating in semiconductor devices. A wide range of simulation approaches and numerical methods will be introduced.
ObjectiveDuring this course the students will:

- learn the physics governing and computational models describing electromagnetic-induced heating;

- get familiar with computational simulation techniques across a wide range of spatial scales, incl. methods to simulate in vivo heating, considering thermoregulation and perfusion, or quantum mechanical approaches considering heat at the level of atomic vibrations;

- implement and apply simulation techniques within a state-of-the-art open-source simulation platform for computational life sciences, as well as a framework for computer-aided design of semiconductor devices;

- learn about remaining challenges in this field
ContentThe following topics will be discussed during the semester:

- Introduction about electromagnetic heating (from its historical perspective to its application in biology);

- Microscopic/Macroscopic thermal transport (governing equations, numerical methods, examples);

- Numerical algorithms and their implementation in python and/or C++, parallelisation approaches, and high performance computing solutions;

- Practical examples: thermal therapy planning with Sim4Life and technology computer aided design with OMEN;

- Model verification and validation.
Lecture notesLecture slides are distributed every week and can be found at
Link
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires an open attitude towards interdisciplinarity, basic python scripting and C++ coding skills, undergraduate entry-level familiarity with electric & magnetic fields/forces, differential equations, calculus, and basic knowledge of biology and quantum mechanics.
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