Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

Energy Science and Technology Master Information
Core Courses
At least two core courses must be passed in each area.
All students must participate in the course offered in the area "Interdisciplinary Energy Management"
Electrical Power Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0122-00LIntroduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & Technology
Students that complete the course from HS 2020 onwards obtain 4 credits.
W4 credits2V + 2UC. Franck, G. Hug
AbstractIntroduction to theory and technology of electric power transmission systems.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: describe the structure of electric power systems, name the most important components and describe what they are needed for, apply models for transformers and overhead power lines, explain the technology of transformers and lines, calculate stationary power flows and other basic parameters in simple power systems.
ContentStructure of electric power systems, transformer and power line models, analysis of and power flow calculation in basic systems, technology and principle of electric power systems.
Lecture notesLecture script in English, exercises and sample solutions.
227-1635-00LElectric Circuits
Students without a background in Electrical Engineering must take "Electric Circuits" before taking "Introduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & Technology"
W4 credits3GM. Zima, D. Shchetinin
AbstractIntroduction to analysis methods and network theorems to describe operation of electric circuits. Theoretical foundations are essential for the analysis of the electric power transmission and distribution grids as well as many modern technological devices – consumer electronics, control systems, computers and communications.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: understand variables in electric circuits, evaluate possible approaches and analyse simple electric circuits with RLC elements, apply circuit theorems to simple meshed circuits, analyze AC circuits in a steady state and understand the connection of the explained principles to the modelling of the 3-phase electric power systems.
ContentCourse will introduce electric circuits variables, circuit elements (resistive, inductive, capacitive), resistive circuits and theorems (Kirchhoffs’ laws, Norton and Thevenin equivalents), nodal and mesh analysis, superposition principle; it will continue by discussing the complete response circuits (RLC), sinusoidal analysis – ac steady state (complex power, reactive, active power) and conclude with the introduction to 3-phase analysis;
Mathematical foundations of the circuit analysis, such as matrix operations and complex numbers will be briefly reviewed.
This course is targeting students who have no prior background in electrical engineering.
Lecture noteslecture and exercises slides will be distributed after each lecture via moodle platform; additional materials to be accessed online (wileyplus)
LiteratureRichard C. Dorf, James A. Svoboda
Introduction to Electric Circuits, 9th Edition
Online materials: Link
Lecture slides and exercises slides
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-ITET. No prior course in electrical engineering is required
Energy Flows and Processes
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0293-00LCombustion and Reactive Processes in Energy and Materials TechnologyW4 credits2V + 1U + 2AN. Noiray, K. Boulouchos, F.  Ernst
AbstractThe students should become familiar with the fundamentals and with application examples of chemically reactive processes in energy conversion (combustion engines in particular) as well as the synthesis of new materials.
ObjectiveThe students should become familiar with the fundamentals and with application examples of chemically reactive processes in energy conversion (combustion engines in particular) as well as the synthesis of new materials. The lecture is part of the focus "Energy, Flows & Processes" on the Bachelor level and is recommended as a basis for a future Master in the area of energy. It is also a facultative lecture on Master level in Energy Science and Technology and Process Engineering.
ContentReaction kinetics, fuel oxidation mechanisms, premixed and diffusion laminar flames, two-phase-flows, turbulence and turbulent combustion, pollutant formation, applications in combustion engines. Synthesis of materials in flame processes: particles, pigments and nanoparticles. Fundamentals of design and optimization of flame reactors, effect of reactant mixing on product characteristics. Tailoring of products made in flame spray pyrolysis.
Lecture notesNo script available. Instead, material will be provided in lecture slides and the following text book (which can be downloaded for free) will be followed:

J. Warnatz, U. Maas, R.W. Dibble, "Combustion:Physical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modeling and Simulation, Experiments, Pollutant Formation", Springer-Verlag, 1997.

Teaching language, assignments and lecture slides in English
LiteratureJ. Warnatz, U. Maas, R.W. Dibble, "Combustion:Physical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modeling and Simulation, Experiments, Pollutant Formation", Springer-Verlag, 1997.

I. Glassman, Combustion, 3rd edition, Academic Press, 1996.
151-1633-00LEnergy Conversion
This course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.
W4 credits3GI. Karlin, G. Sansavini
AbstractThis course provides the students with an introduction to thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students shall gain basic understanding of energy, energy interactions, and various mechanisms of heat transfer as well as their link to energy conversion technologies.
ObjectiveThermodynamics is key to understanding and use of energy conversion processes in Nature and technology. Main objective of this course is to give a compact introduction into basics of Thermodynamics: Thermodynamic states and thermodynamic processes; Work and Heat; First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. Students shall learn how to use energy balance equation in the analysis of power cycles and shall be able to evaluate efficiency of internal combustion engines, gas turbines and steam power plants. The course shall extensively use thermodynamic charts to building up students’ intuition about opportunities and restrictions to increase useful work output of energy conversion. Thermodynamic functions such as entropy, enthalpy and free enthalpy shall be used to understand chemical and phase equilibrium. The course also gives introduction to refrigeration cycles, combustion and psychrometry. The course compactly covers the standard course of thermodynamics for engineers, with additional topics of a general physics interest (nonideal gas equation of state and Joule-Thomson effect) also included.
Content1. Thermodynamic systems, states and state variables
2. Properties of substances: Water, air and ideal gas
3. Energy conservation in closed and open systems: work, internal energy, heat and enthalpy
4. Second law of thermodynamics and entropy
5. Energy analysis of steam power cycles
6. Energy analysis of gas power cycles
7. Refrigeration and heat pump cycles
8. Nonideal gas equation of state and Joule-Thomson effect
9. Maximal work and exergy
10. Mixtures and psychrometry
11. Chemical reactions and combustion systems; chemical and phase equilibrium
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documentation will be available online.
LiteratureThermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, by Cengel, Y. A. and Boles, M. A., McGraw Hill
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.

Students are assumed to have an adequate background in calculus, physics, and engineering mechanics.
Energy Economics and Policy
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-0503-00LPrinciples of Microeconomics
GESS (Science in Perspective): This lecture is for MSc students only. BSc students register for 363-1109-00L Einführung in die Mikroökonomie.
W3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractThe course introduces basic principles, problems and approaches of microeconomics. This provides the students with reflective and contextual knowledge on how societies use scarce resources to produce goods and services and ensure a (fair) distribution.
ObjectiveThe learning objectives of the course are:

(1) Students must be able to discuss basic principles, problems and approaches in microeconomics. (2) Students can analyse and explain simple economic principles in a market using supply and demand graphs. (3) Students can contrast different market structures and describe firm and consumer behaviour. (4) Students can identify market failures such as externalities related to market activities and illustrate how these affect the economy as a whole. (5) Students can also recognize behavioural failures within a market and discuss basic concepts related to behavioural economics. (6) Students can apply simple mathematical concepts on economic problems.
ContentThe resources on our planet are finite. The discipline of microeconomics therefore deals with the question of how society can use scarce resources to produce goods and services and ensure a (fair) distribution. In particular, microeconomics deals with the behaviour of consumers and firms in different market forms. Economic considerations and discussions are not part of classical engineering and science study programme. Thus, the goal of the lecture "Principles of Microeconomics" is to teach students how economic thinking and argumentation works. The course should help the students to look at the contents of their own studies from a different perspective and to be able to critically reflect on economic problems discussed in the society.

Topics covered by the course are:

- Supply and demand
- Consumer demand: neoclassical and behavioural perspective
- Cost of production: neoclassical and behavioural perspective
- Welfare economics, deadweight losses
- Governmental policies
- Market failures, common resources and public goods
- Public sector, tax system
- Market forms (competitive, monopolistic, monopolistic competitive, oligopolistic)
- International trade
Lecture notesLecture notes, exercises and reference material can be downloaded from Moodle.
LiteratureN. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2020), "Economics", 5th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.
The book can also be used for the course 'Principles of Macroeconomics' (Sturm)

For students taking only the course 'Principles of Microeconomics' there is a shorter version of the same book:
N. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2020), "Microeconomics", 5th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.

Complementary:
R. Pindyck and D. Rubinfeld (2018), "Microeconomics", 9th edition, Pearson Education.
Prerequisites / NoticeGESS (Science in Perspective): This lecture is for MSc students only. BSc students register for 363-1109-00L Einführung in die Mikroökonomie.
Interdisciplinary Energy Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1631-10LCase Studies: Energy Systems and Technology: Part 1 Restricted registration - show details
Only for Energy Science and Technology MSc.
O2 credits4GC. Franck, C. Schaffner
AbstractThis course will allow the students to get an interdisciplinary overview of the “Energy” topic. It will explore the challenges to build a sustainable energy system for the future. This will be done through the means of case studies that the students have to work on. These case studies will be provided by industry partners.
ObjectiveThe students will understand the different aspects involved in designing solutions for a sustainable future energy system. They will have experience in collaborating in interdisciplinary teams. They will have an understanding on how industry is approaching new solutions.
Lecture notesDescriptions of case studies.
Industrial Internship
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1650-10LInternship in Industry Restricted registration - show details
Only for Energy Science and Technology MSc.
O12 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose master's students to the industrial work environment. During this period, students have the opportunity to be involved in on-going projects at the host institution.
Objectivesee above
Semester Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1101-00LHow to Write Scientific Texts
Strongly recommended prerequisite for Semester Projects and Master Theses at D-ITET (MSc BME, MSc EEIT, MSc EST).
E-0 creditsU. Koch
AbstractThe 4 hour lecture covers the basics of writing & presenting a scientific text. The focus will be on the structure and elements of a scientific text and not on the language. Citation rules, good practice of scientific writing and an overview on software tools will be part of the training.
The lecture will be thought on two afternoons. Some exercises will be built into the lecture.
ObjectiveKnowledge on structure and content of a scientific text. The course further is arranged to stimulate a discussion on how to properly write a legible scientific text versus writing an interesting novel. We will further discuss the practice of properly citing and critically reflect on recent plagiarism allegations.
Content* Topic 1: Structure of a Scientific Text (The Title, the author list, the abstract, State-of-the Art, the "in this paper" paragraph, the scientific part, the summary, Equations, Figures).

* Topic 2: Power Point Presentations.

* Topic 3: Citation Rules and Citation Software.

* Topic 4: Guidelines for Research Integrity.
LiteratureETH "Citation Etiquette", see Link.

ETH Guidlines on "Guidelines for Research Integrity", see Link > Education > > Contacts, links & documents > Forms and documents > Brochures / guides.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should already have a Bachelor degree and plan to do either a semester project or a master thesis in the immediate future.
227-1671-10LSemester ProjectO12 credits20ASupervisors
AbstractThe semester project is designed to train the students in solving specific problems from the field of Energy Science & Technology. This project uses the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. The semester project ist advised by a professor and must be approved in advance by the tutor.
Objectivesee above
Electives
These courses are particularly recommended, other ETH-courses from the field of Energy Science and Technology at large may be chosen in accordance with your tutor.
Electrical Power Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0113-00LPower Electronics Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractFields of application of power electronic systems. Principle of operation of basic pulse-width modulated and line-commutated power electronic converters, analysis of the operating behavior and of the control oriented behavior, converter design. Reduction of effects of line-commutated rectifiers on the mains, electromagnetic compatibility.
ObjectiveFields of application of power electronic systems. Principle of operation of basic pulse-width modulated and line-commutated power electronic converters, analysis of the operating behavior and of the controloriented behavior, converter design. Reduction of effects of line-commutated rectifiers on the mains, electromagnetic compatibility.
ContentBasic structure of power electronic systems, applications. DC/DC converters, high frequency isolation, control oriented modeling / state-space averaging and PWM switch model. Power semiconductors, non-idealities, cooling. Magnetic components, skin and proximity effect, design. Electromagnetic compatibility. Single-phase diode bridge with capacitive smoothing, effects on the mains, power factor correction / PWM rectifier. Pulse-width modulated single-phase and three-phase full bridge converter with impressed DC voltage, modulation schemes, space vector calculus. Line-commutated single-phase full bridge with impressed output current, commutation, phase-control, inverter operation, commutation failure. Line-commutated three-phase full bridge converter, impressed output voltage, impressed output current / phase-control. Parallel connection of three-phase line-commutated thyristor circuits, inter-phase transformer. Anti-parallel connection of three-phase line-commutated thyristor bridge circuits, four-quadrant DC motor drive. Load-resonant converters, state plane analysis.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge of electric circuit analysis and signal theory.
227-0117-00LHigh Voltage EngineeringW6 credits4GC. Franck, U. Straumann
AbstractHigh electric fields are used in numerous technological and industrial applications such as electric power transmission and distribution, X-ray devices, DNA sequencers, flue gas cleaning, power electronics, lasers, particle accelerators, copying machines, .... High Voltage Engineering is the art of gaining technological control of high electrical field strengths and high voltages.
ObjectiveThe students know the fundamental phenomena and principles associated with the occurrence of high electric field strengths. They understand the different mechanisms leading to the failure of insulation systems and are able to apply failure criteria on the dimensioning of high voltage components. They have the ability to identify of weak spots in insulation systems and to propose options for improvement. Further, they know the different insulation systems and their dimensioning in practice.
Content- discussion of the field equations relevant for high voltage engineering.
- analytical and numerical solutions/solving of this equations, as well as the derivation of the important equivalent circuits for the description of the fields and losses in insulations
- introduction to kinetic gas theory
- mechanisms of the breakdown in gaseous, liquid and solid insulations, as well as insulation systems
- methods for the mathematical determination of the electric withstand of gaseous, liquid and solid insulations
- application of the expertise on high voltage components
- excursions to manufacturers of high voltage components
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureA. Küchler, High Voltage Engineering: Fundamentals – Technology – Applications, Springer Berlin, 2018 (ISBN 978-3-642-11992-7)
227-0247-00LPower Electronic Systems I Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractBasics of the switching behavior, gate drive and snubber circuits of power semiconductors are discussed. Soft-switching and resonant DC/DC converters are analyzed in detail and high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components are explained. Space vector modulation of three-phase inverters is introduced and the main power components are designed for typical industry applications.
ObjectiveDetailed understanding of the principle of operation and modulation of advanced power electronics converter systems, especially of zero voltage switching and zero current switching non-isolated and isolated DC/DC converter systems and three-phase voltage DC link inverter systems. Furthermore, the course should convey knowledge on the switching frequency related losses of power semiconductors and inductive power components and introduce the concept of space vector calculus which provides a basis for the comprehensive discussion of three-phase PWM converters systems in the lecture Power Electronic Systems II.
ContentBasics of the switching behavior and gate drive circuits of power semiconductor devices and auxiliary circuits for minimizing the switching losses are explained. Furthermore, zero voltage switching, zero current switching, and resonant DC/DC converters are discussed in detail; the operating behavior of isolated full-bridge DC/DC converters is detailed for different secondary side rectifier topologies; high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components of converter circuits are explained and approximate calculation methods are presented; the concept of space vector calculus for analyzing three-phase systems is introduced; finally, phase-oriented and space vector modulation of three-phase inverter systems are discussed related to voltage DC link inverter systems and the design of the main power components based on analytical calculations is explained.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory course on power electronics.
227-0523-00LRailway Systems IW6 credits4GM. Meyer
AbstractBasic characteristis of railway vehicles and their interfaces with the railway infrastructure:
- Transportation tasks and vehicle types
- Running dynamics
- Mechanical part of rail vehicles
- Brakes
- Traction chain and auxiliary supply
- Railway power supply
- Signalling systems
- Standards
- Availability and safety
- Traffic control and maintenance
Objective- Overview of the technical characteristics of railway systems
- Know-how about the design and construction principles of rail vehicles
- Interrelationship between different fields of engineering sciences (mechanics, electro and information technology, transport systems)
- Understanding tasks and opportunities of engineers working in an environment which has strong economical and political boundaries
- Insight into the activities of the railway vehicle industry and railway operators in Switzerland
- Motivation of young engineers to start a career in the railway industry or with railway operators
ContentEST I (Herbstsemester) - Begriffen, Grundlagen, Merkmale

1 Einführung:
1.1 Geschichte und Struktur des Bahnsystems
1.2 Fahrdynamik

2 Vollbahnfahrzeuge:
2.3 Mechanik: Kasten, Drehgestelle, Lauftechnik, Adhäsion
2.2 Bremsen
2.3 Traktionsantriebssysteme
2.4 Hilfsbetriebe und Komfortanlagen
2.5 Steuerung und Regelung

3 Infrastruktur:
3.1 Fahrweg
3.2 Bahnstromversorgung
3.3 Sicherungsanlagen

4 Betrieb:
4.1 Interoperabilität, Normen und Zulassung
4.2 RAMS, LCC
4.3 Anwendungsbeispiele

Voraussichtlich ein oder zwei Gastreferate

Geplante Exkursionen:
Betriebszentrale SBB, Zürich Flughafen
Reparatur und Unterhalt, SBB Zürich Altstetten
Fahrzeugfertigung, Stadler Bussnang
Lecture notesAbgabe der Unterlagen (gegen eine Schutzgebühr) zu Beginn des Semesters. Rechtzeitig eingschriebene Teilnehmer können die Unterlagen auf Wunsch und gegen eine Zusatzgebühr auch in Farbe beziehen.
Prerequisites / NoticeDozent:
Dr. Markus Meyer, Emkamatik GmbH

Voraussichtlich ein oder zwei Gastvorträge von anderen Referenten.

EST I (Herbstsemester) kann als in sich geschlossene einsemestrige Vorlesung besucht werden. EST II (Frühjahrssemester) dient der weiteren Vertiefung der Fahrzeugtechnik und der Integration in die Bahninfrastruktur.
227-0526-00LPower System AnalysisW6 credits4GG. Hug
AbstractThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems and the application of analysis tools in steady and dynamic states.
ContentThe course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power grids. Approaches such as the Newton-Raphson algorithm applied to power flow equations, superposition technique for short-circuit analysis, equal area criterion and nose curve analysis are discussed as well as power flow computation techniques for distribution grids.
Lecture notesLecture notes.
227-0731-00LPower Market I - Portfolio and Risk ManagementW6 credits4GD. Reichelt, G. A. Koeppel
AbstractPortfolio and risk management in the electrical power business, Pan-European power market and trading, futures and forward contracts, hedging, options and derivatives, performance indicators for the risk management, modelling of physical assets, cross-border trading, ancillary services, balancing power market, Swiss market model.
ObjectiveKnowlege on the worldwide liberalisation of electricity markets, pan-european power trading and the role of power exchanges. Understand financial products (derivatives) based on power. Management of a portfolio containing physical production, contracts and derivatives. Evaluate trading and hedging strategies. Apply methods and tools of risk management.
Content1. Pan-European power market and trading
1.1. Power trading
1.2. Development of the European power markets
1.3. Energy economics
1.4. Spot and OTC trading
1.5. European energy exchange EEX

2. Market model
2.1. Market place and organisation
2.2. Balance groups / balancing energy
2.3. Ancillary services
2.4. Market for ancillary services
2.5. Cross-border trading
2.6. Capacity auctions

3. Portfolio and Risk management
3.1. Portfolio management 1 (introduction)
3.2. Forward and futures contracts
3.3. Risk management 1 (m2m, VaR, hpfc, volatility, cVaR)
3.4. Risk management 2 (PaR)
3.5. Contract valuation (HPFC)
3.6. Portfolio management 2
2.8. Risk Management 3 (enterprise wide)

4. Energy & Finance I
4.1. Options 1 – basics
4.2. Options 2 – hedging with options
4.3. Introduction to derivatives (swaps, cap, floor, collar)
4.4. Financial modelling of physical assets
4.5. Trading and hydro power
4.6. Incentive regulation
Lecture notesHandouts of the lecture
Prerequisites / Notice1 excursion per semester, 2 case studies, guest speakers for specific topics.
Course Moodle: Link
227-0615-00LSimulation of Photovoltaic Devices - From Materials to ModulesW3 credits2GU. Aeberhard
AbstractThe lecture provides an introduction to the theoretical foundations and numerical approaches for the simulation of photovoltaic energy conversion, from the microscopic description of component materials, nanostructures and interfaces to macroscopic continuum modelling of solar cells and network simulation or effective models for entire solar modules and large scale photovoltaic systems.
ObjectiveKnow how to obtain and assess by simulation the key material properties and device parameters relevant for photovoltaic energy conversion.
ContentThe lecture provides an introduction to the theoretical foundations and numerical approaches for the simulation of photovoltaic energy conversion, from the microscopic description of component materials, nanostructures and interfaces to macroscopic continuum modelling of solar cells and network simulation or effective models for entire solar modules and large scale photovoltaic systems.
Prerequisites / NoticeUndergraduate physics, mathematics, semiconductor devices
227-0617-00LSolar CellsW4 credits3GA. N. Tiwari, R. Carron, Y. Romanyuk
AbstractPhysics, technology, characteristics and applications of photovoltaic solar cells.
ObjectiveIntroduction to solar radiation, physics, technology, characteristics and applications of photovoltaic solar cells and systems.
ContentSolar radiation characteristics, physical mechanisms for the light to electrical power conversion, properties of semiconductors for solar cells, processing and properties of conventional Si and GaAs based solar cells, technology and physics of thin film solar cells based on compound semiconductors, other solar cells including organic and dye sensitized cells, problems and new developments for power generation in space, interconnection of cells and solar module design, measurement techniques, system design of photovoltaic plants, system components such as inverters and controllers, engineering procedures with software domonstration, integration in buildings and other specific examples.
Lecture notesLecture reprints (in english).
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge of semiconductor properties.
Energy Flows and Processes
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0123-00LExperimental Methods for EngineersW4 credits2V + 2UT. Rösgen, N. Noiray, H.‑M. Prasser, A. Pun, M. Tibbitt
AbstractThe course presents an overview of measurement tasks in engineering environments. Different concepts for the acquisition and processing of typical measurement quantities are introduced. Following an initial in-class introduction, laboratory exercises from different application areas (especially in thermofluidics and process engineering) are attended by students in small groups.
ObjectiveIntroduction to various aspects of measurement techniques, with particular emphasis on thermo-fluidic applications.
Understanding of various sensing technologies and analysis procedures.
Exposure to typical experiments, diagnostics hardware, data acquisition and processing.
Study of applications in the laboratory.
Fundamentals of scientific documentation & reporting.
ContentIn-class introduction to representative measurement techniques in the
research areas of the participating institutes (fluid dynamics, energy technology, process engineering)
Student participation in 8-10 laboratory experiments (study groups of 3-5 students, dependent on the number of course participants and available experiments)
Lab reports for all attended experiments have to be submitted by the study groups.
A final exam evaluates the acquired knowledge individually.
Lecture notesPresentations, handouts and instructions are provided for each experiment.
LiteratureHolman, J.P. "Experimental Methods for Engineers", McGraw-Hill 2001, ISBN 0-07-366055-8
Morris, A.S. & Langari, R. "Measurement and Instrumentation", Elsevier 2011, ISBN 0-12-381960-4
Eckelmann, H. "Einführung in die Strömungsmesstechnik", Teubner 1997, ISBN 3-519-02379-2
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic understanding in the following areas:
- fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer
- electrical engineering / electronics
- numerical data analysis and processing (e.g. using MATLAB)
151-0163-00LNuclear Energy ConversionW4 credits2V + 1UH.‑M. Prasser
AbstractPhyiscal fundamentals of the fission reaction and the sustainable chain reaction, thermal design, construction, function and operation of nuclear reactors and power plants, light water reactors and other reactor types, converion and breeding
ObjectiveStudents get an overview on energy conversion in nuclear power plants, on construction and function of the most important types of nuclear reactors with special emphasis to light water reactors. They obtain the mathematical/physical basis for quantitative assessments concerning most relevant aspects of design, dynamic behaviour as well as material and energy flows.
ContentNuclear physics of fission and chain reaction. Themodynamics of nuclear reactors. Design of the rector core. Introduction into the dynamic behaviour of nuclear reactors. Overview on types of nuclear reactors, difference between thermal reactors and fast breaders. Construction and operation of nuclear power plants with pressurized and boiling water reactors, role and function of the most important safety systems, special features of the energy conversion. Development tendencies of rector technology.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be distributed. Additional literature and information on the website of the lab: Link
LiteratureS. Glasston & A. Sesonke: Nuclear Reactor Engineering, Reactor System Engineering, Ed. 4, Vol. 2., Springer-Science+Business Media, B.V.

R. L. Murray: Nuclear Energy (Sixth Edition), An Introduction to the Concepts, Systems, and Applications of Nuclear Processes, Elsevier
151-0185-00LRadiation Heat Transfer Information W4 credits2V + 1UA. Steinfeld, P. Pozivil
AbstractAdvanced course in radiation heat transfer
ObjectiveFundamentals of radiative heat transfer and its applications. Examples are combustion and solar thermal/thermochemical processes, and other applications in the field of energy conversion and material processing.
Content1. Introduction to thermal radiation. Definitions. Spectral and directional properties. Electromagnetic spectrum. Blackbody and gray surfaces. Absorptivity, emissivity, reflectivity. Planck's Law, Wien's Displacement Law, Kirchhoff's Law.

2. Surface radiation exchange. Diffuse and specular surfaces. Gray and selective surfaces. Configuration factors. Radiation exchange. Enclosure theory, radiosity method. Monte Carlo.

3.Absorbing, emitting and scattering media. Extinction, absorption, and scattering coefficients. Scattering phase function. Optical thickness. Equation of radiative transfer. Solution methods: discrete ordinate, zone, Monte-Carlo.

4. Applications. Cavities. Selective surfaces and media. Semi-transparent windows. Combined radiation-conduction-convection heat transfer.
Lecture notesCopy of the slides presented.
LiteratureR. Siegel, J.R. Howell, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 3rd. ed., Taylor & Francis, New York, 2002.

M. Modest, Radiative Heat Transfer, Academic Press, San Diego, 2003.
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