Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

Environmental Engineering Master Information
Majors
Major Urban Water Management
Ecological Systems Design
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0307-01LAdvanced Environmental, Social and Economic Assessments Restricted registration - show details
The combined course unit is only for Master students in Environmental Engineering. All other students enrol for one or both out of the single courses.
O5 credits4GA. E. Braunschweig, S. Pfister, R. Frischknecht
AbstractThis course deepens students' knowledge of environmental, economic, and social assessment methodologies and their various applications.
ObjectiveThis course has the aim of deepening students' knowledge of the environmental, economic and social assessment methodologies and their various applications.

In particular, students completing the course should have the
- ability to judge the scientific quality and reliability of environmental assessment studies, the appropriateness of inventory data and modelling, and the adequacy of life cycle impact assessment models and factors
- knowledge about the current state of the scientific discussion and new research developments
- ability to properly plan, conduct and interpret environmental assessment studies

In the course element "Implementation of Environmental and other Sustainability Goals", students will learn to
- describe key sustainability problems of the current economic system and measuring units.
- describe the management system of an organisation and how to develop a sustainability orientation
- discuss approaches to measure environmental performance of an organisation, including 'organisational LCA' (Ecobalance)
- explain the pros and cons of single score environmental assessment methods
- demonstrate life cycle costing
- interpret stakeholder relations of an organisation
- (if time allows) describe sustainable supply chain management and stakeholder management
ContentPart I (Advanced Environmental Assessments)
- Inventory database developments, transparency, data quality, data completeness, and data exchange formats, uncertainties
- Software tools (MFA, LCA)
- Allocation (multioutput processes and recycling)
- Hybrid LCA methods.
- Consequential and marginal analysis
- Impact assessment of waterborne chemical emissions, sum parameters, mixture toxicity
- Spatial differentiation in Life Cycle Assessment
- Workplace and indoor exposure in Risk and Life Cycle Assessment
- Subjectivity in environmental assessments
- Multicriteria Decision Analysis
- Case Studies

Part II (Implementation of Environmental and other Sustainability Goals):
- Sustainability problems of the current economic system and its measuring units;
- The structure of a management system, and elements to integrate environmental management (ISO 14001) and social management (SA8000 as well as ISO 26000), especially into strategy development, planning, controlling and communication;
- Sustainability Opportunities and Innovation
- The concept of 'Continuous Improvement'
- Life Cycle Costing, Life Cycle Management
- environmental performance measurement of an organisation, including 'organisational LCA' (Ecobalance), based on practical examples of companies and new concepts
- single score env. assessment methods (Swiss ecopoints)
- stakeholder management and sustainability oriented communication
- an intro into sustainability issues of supply chain management
Students will get small excercises related to course issues.
Lecture notesPart I: Slides and background reading material will be available on lecture homepage
Part II: Documents will be available on Ilias
LiteratureWill be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course should only be elected by students of environmental engineering with a with a Module in Ecological Systems Design. All other students should take the individual courses in Advanced Environmental Assessment and/or Implementation of Environmental and other Sustainability goals (with or without exercise and lab).

Basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools is a prerequisite for this class. Students who have not yet had classwork in this topic are required to read an appropriate textbook before or at the beginning of this course (e.g. Jolliet, O et al. (2016). Environmental Life Cycle Assessment. CRC Press, Boca Raton - London - New York. ISBN 978-1-4398-8766-0 (Chapters 2-5.2)).
102-0317-03LAdvanced Environmental Assessment (Computer Lab I)O1 credit1US. Pfister
AbstractDifferent tools and software used for environmental assessments, such as LCA are introduced. The students will have hands-on exercises in the computer rooms and will gain basic knowledge on how to apply the software and other resources in practice
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with various software programs for environmental assessment including Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental Risk Assessment, Probabilistic Modeling, Material Flow Analysis.
Process Engineering in Urban Water Management
No courses in autumn semester (HS), only in spring semester (FS).
Systems Analysis in Urban Water Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0227-00LSystems Analysis and Mathematical Modeling in Urban Water Management Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
O6 credits4GE. Morgenroth, M. Maurer
AbstractSystematic introduction of material balances, transport processes, kinetics, stoichiometry and conservation. Ideal reactors, residence time distribution, heterogeneous systems, dynamic response of reactors. Parameter identification, local sensitivity, error propagation, Monte Carlo simulation. Introduction to real time control (PID controllers). Extensive coding of examples in Berkeley Madonna.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students with an understanding and the tools to develop their own mathematical models, to plan experiments, to evaluate error propagation and to test simple process control strategies in the field of process engineering in urban water management.
ContentThe course will provide a broad introduction into the fundamentals of modeling water treatment systems. The topics are:
- Introduction into modeling and simulation
- The material balance equations, transport processes, transformation processes (kinetics, stoichiometry, conservation)
- Ideal reactors
- Hydraulic residence time distribution and modeling of real reactors
- Dynamic behavior of reactor systems
- Systems analytical tools: Sensitivity, parameter identification, error propagation, Monte Carlo simulation
- Introduction to process control (PID controller, fuzzy control)
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
LiteratureThere will be a required textbook that students need to purchase:
Willi Gujer (2008): Systems Analysis for Water Technology. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg
Prerequisites / NoticeStudends should have a general understanding of urban water management as many examples are taken from processes relevant to related systems. This course is offered in parallel with the course Process Engineering Ia. It is beneficial but not necesssary to follow both courses simultaneously.
102-0217-00LProcess Engineering Ia Information O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractBiological processes used in wastewater treatment, organic waste management, biological resource recovery. Focus on fundamental principles of biological processes and process design based on kinetic and stoichiometric principles. Processes include anaerobic digestion for biogas production and aerobic wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate and design biological processes. Develop simple mathematical models to simulate treatment processes.
ContentStoichiometry
Microbial transformation processes
Introduction to design and modeling of activated sludge processes
Anaerobic processes, industrial applications, sludge stabilization
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
LiteratureThere will be a required textbook that students need to purchase (see Link for further information).
Prerequisites / NoticeFor detailed information on prerequisites and information needed from Systems Analysis and Mathematical Modeling the student should consult the lecture program and important information (syllabus) of Process Engineering Ia that can be downloaded at Link
Water Infrastructure Planning and Stormwater Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0250-00LUrban Drainage Planning and Modelling Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 36.

Only for Environmental Engineers Msc in the module Water Infrastructure Planning and Stormwater Management.
O6 credits4GM. Maurer, F. Blumensaat, U. Karaus, J. P. Leitão Correia , J. Rieckermann
AbstractIn this course the students learn modern urban drainage engineering approaches, critical thinking, decision making in a complex environment and dealing with insufficient data and ill-defined problems.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, you should be able to do the following:
-Apply different methods and methodologies to assess the impact of urban drainage on water pollution and flooding potential.
-Distinguish between hydrological and hydrodynamic models and their correct application.
-Identify the difference between emission and immersion oriented approaches for identifying drainage measures.
-Identify relevant measures, quantify their effects and assess their relative ranking/priority.
-Consider uncertainties and handle correctly incomplete data and information
-Make decisions and recommendations in a complex application case.
-Teamwork. State principles of effective team performance and the functions of different team roles; work effectively in problem-solving teams.
-Communication. Communicate and document your findings in concise group presentations and a written report.
ContentIn urban drainage the complexity of the decision-making, the available methodologies and the data availability increased strongly. In current environmental engineering practice, the focus shifted from tables and nomograms to sophisticated simulation tools.
The topics cover:
-Integrated urban water management
-Hydrological and hydrodynamic modelling
-Water quality based assessment
-Freshwater ecology
-Hydraulic capacity assessment
-Sewer network operation
-Decision analysis
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: 102-0214-00 Siedlungswasserwirtschaft and 102-0215-00 Siedlungswasserwirtschaft II or comparable educational background.
Major Environmental Technologies
Air Quality Control
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0377-00LAir Pollution Modeling and ChemistryO3 credits2GS. Henne, S. Reimann Bhend, X. Zhang
AbstractAir pollutants cause negative effects on humans, wildlife and buildings. To control and reduce the impact of air pollutants, their transfer from sources to receptors needs to be known. This transfer includes transport within the atmospheric boundary layer, chemical transformation reactions and phase-transfer processes from gases to particles.
ObjectiveThe students understand the fundamental principles of atmospheric transport, dispersion and chemistry of pollutants on the local to regional scale and their transfer gas to particle phases (secondary aerosols). This includes the knowledge of important atmospheric reactions, sources and sinks. The obtained understanding enables the students to apply computational tools to predict the transport and transformation of chemicals at the local to regional scale.
Content- Structure of the Atmosphere
- Thermodynamics of the atmosphere
- Atmospheric stability
- Atmospheric boundary layer and turbulence
- Dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer
- Numerical models of atmospheric dispersion
- Gas phase reaction kinetics
- Tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation
- Chemistry box models
- Volatile organic pollutants (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic pollutants (SVOCs)
- Aerosol modelling
- Air pollution source apportionment
- Inverse modelling of emissions
Lecture notesContinued updates of:
-Slides and handouts
-Home assignments and sample solutions
-R package and code for some of the home assignments
-MATLAB codes
-Key journal articles as discussed during lecture
LiteratureAtmospheric chemistry
Jacobson, M.Z., 2012. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science and Solutions, 405 pp., Cambridge University Press.
Finlayson-Pitts, B. J. and Pitts, J. N., 2000. Chemistry of the upper and lower atmosphere, 969 pp., Academic Press, San Diego.
Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N., 2012. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, 3 ed., 1203 pp., Wiley.
Sportisse Bruno, 2010. Fundamentals in Air Pollution From Processes to Modelling.
R M Harrison, R E Hester, Xavier Querol, 2016. Airborne Particulate Matter: Sources, Atmospheric Processes and Health.



Environmental organic chemistry and mass transfer
Schwarzenbach, R.P., Gschwend, P. M., Imboden, D. M., 2002. Environmental Organic Chemistry, 1328 pp, Wiley & sons, New York
Mackay D., Multimedia environmental models : the fugacity approach; Boca Raton, Fla. : Lewis Publishers; 2001; 2nd ed

Atmospheric dynamics and boundary layer
Stull, R. B., 1988. An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology, 666 pp., Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht.
Etling, D., 2008. Theoretische Meteorologie Eine Einfuhrung, 3 ed., 376 pp., Springer.

Atmospheric modelling
Jacobson, M. Z., 2005. Fundamentals of atmospheric modeling, 2 ed., 813 pp., Cambridge University Press.

Introduction to R
Dalgaard, P., 2002. Introductory statistics with R, 267 pp., Springer, New York
Prerequisites / Noticestrongly recommended: 102-0635-01L Luftreinhaltung (Air Pollution Control) or similar
Process Engineering in Urban Water Management
No courses in autumn semester (HS), only in spring semester (FS).
Systems Analysis in Urban Water Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0227-00LSystems Analysis and Mathematical Modeling in Urban Water Management Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
O6 credits4GE. Morgenroth, M. Maurer
AbstractSystematic introduction of material balances, transport processes, kinetics, stoichiometry and conservation. Ideal reactors, residence time distribution, heterogeneous systems, dynamic response of reactors. Parameter identification, local sensitivity, error propagation, Monte Carlo simulation. Introduction to real time control (PID controllers). Extensive coding of examples in Berkeley Madonna.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students with an understanding and the tools to develop their own mathematical models, to plan experiments, to evaluate error propagation and to test simple process control strategies in the field of process engineering in urban water management.
ContentThe course will provide a broad introduction into the fundamentals of modeling water treatment systems. The topics are:
- Introduction into modeling and simulation
- The material balance equations, transport processes, transformation processes (kinetics, stoichiometry, conservation)
- Ideal reactors
- Hydraulic residence time distribution and modeling of real reactors
- Dynamic behavior of reactor systems
- Systems analytical tools: Sensitivity, parameter identification, error propagation, Monte Carlo simulation
- Introduction to process control (PID controller, fuzzy control)
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
LiteratureThere will be a required textbook that students need to purchase:
Willi Gujer (2008): Systems Analysis for Water Technology. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg
Prerequisites / NoticeStudends should have a general understanding of urban water management as many examples are taken from processes relevant to related systems. This course is offered in parallel with the course Process Engineering Ia. It is beneficial but not necesssary to follow both courses simultaneously.
102-0217-00LProcess Engineering Ia Information O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractBiological processes used in wastewater treatment, organic waste management, biological resource recovery. Focus on fundamental principles of biological processes and process design based on kinetic and stoichiometric principles. Processes include anaerobic digestion for biogas production and aerobic wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate and design biological processes. Develop simple mathematical models to simulate treatment processes.
ContentStoichiometry
Microbial transformation processes
Introduction to design and modeling of activated sludge processes
Anaerobic processes, industrial applications, sludge stabilization
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
LiteratureThere will be a required textbook that students need to purchase (see Link for further information).
Prerequisites / NoticeFor detailed information on prerequisites and information needed from Systems Analysis and Mathematical Modeling the student should consult the lecture program and important information (syllabus) of Process Engineering Ia that can be downloaded at Link
Waste Management
Remark: 102-0337-00 Landfilling, Contaminated Sites and Radioactive Waste Repositories only for those students also taking module "System Analysis in Urban Water Management" as replacement of 102-0217-00 Process Engineering Ia in module "Waste Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0357-00LWaste Recycling TechnologiesO3 credits2GR. Bunge
AbstractWaste Recycling Technology (WRT) is a sub-discipline of Mechanical Process Engineering. WRT is employed in production plants processing contaminated soil, construction wastes, scrap metal, recovered paper and the like. While WRT is well established in Central Europe, it is only just now catching on in emerging markets as well.
ObjectiveAt the core of this course is the separation of mixtures of solid bulk materials according to physical properties such as color, electrical conductivity, magnetism and so forth. After having taken this course, the students should have concept not only of the unit operations employed in WRT but also of how these unit operations are integrated into the flow sheets of production plants.
ContentIntroduction
Waste Recycling: Scope and objectives
Waste recycling technologies in Switzerland

Fundamentals
Properties of particles: Liberation conditions, Particle size and shape, Porosity of bulk materials
Fluid dynamics of particles: Stationary particle beds, Fluidized beds, Free settling particles
Flow sheet basics: Balancing mass flows
Standard processes: batch vs. continuous …
Assessment of separation success: Separation function; grade vs. recovery

Separation Processes
Separation according to size and shape (Classification): Screening, Flow separation
Separation according to material properties (Concentration): Manual Sorting, Gravity concentration; Magnetic separation, Eddy current separation, Electrostatic separation, Sensor technology, Froth flotation
Lecture notesThe script consists of the slides shown during the lectures. Background material will be provided on the script-server.
LiteratureA list of recommended books will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe topic will be discussed not from the perspective of theory, but rather in the context of practical application. However, solid fundamentals in physics (in particular in mechanics) are strongly recommended.
102-0337-00LLandfilling, Contaminated Sites and Radioactive Waste Repositories Restricted registration - show details
Only for Environmental Engineering MSc.
O3 credits2GM. Plötze, W. Hummel
AbstractPractices of landfilling and remediation of contaminated sites and disposal of radioactive waste are based on the same concepts that aim to protect the environment. The assessment of contaminants that may leach into the environment as a function of time and how to reduce the rate of their release is key to the design of chemical, technical and geological barriers.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course students are able to:
- assess the risk posed to the environment of landfills, contaminated sites and radioactive waste repositories in terms of fate and transport of contaminants
- describe technologies available to minimize environmental contamination
- describe the principles in handling of contaminated sites and to propose and evaluate suitable remediation techniques
- explain the concepts that underlie radioactive waste disposal practices
ContentThis lecture course comprises of lectures with exercises and guided case studies.
- A short overview of the principles of environmental protection in waste management and how this is applied in legislation.
- A overview of the chemistry underlying the release and transport of contaminants from the landfilled/contaminated material/radioactive waste repository focusing on processes that control redox state and pH buffer capacity; mobility of heavy metals and organic compounds
- Technical barrier design and function. Clay as a barrier.
- Contaminated site remediation: Site evaluation, remediation technologies
- Concepts and safety in radioactive waste management
- Role of the geological and engineered barriers and radionuclide transport in geological media.
Lecture notesShort script plus copies of overheads
LiteratureLiterature will be made available.
102-0217-00LProcess Engineering Ia Information O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractBiological processes used in wastewater treatment, organic waste management, biological resource recovery. Focus on fundamental principles of biological processes and process design based on kinetic and stoichiometric principles. Processes include anaerobic digestion for biogas production and aerobic wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate and design biological processes. Develop simple mathematical models to simulate treatment processes.
ContentStoichiometry
Microbial transformation processes
Introduction to design and modeling of activated sludge processes
Anaerobic processes, industrial applications, sludge stabilization
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
LiteratureThere will be a required textbook that students need to purchase (see Link for further information).
Prerequisites / NoticeFor detailed information on prerequisites and information needed from Systems Analysis and Mathematical Modeling the student should consult the lecture program and important information (syllabus) of Process Engineering Ia that can be downloaded at Link
Major Resource Management
Ecological Systems Design
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0307-01LAdvanced Environmental, Social and Economic Assessments Restricted registration - show details
The combined course unit is only for Master students in Environmental Engineering. All other students enrol for one or both out of the single courses.
O5 credits4GA. E. Braunschweig, S. Pfister, R. Frischknecht
AbstractThis course deepens students' knowledge of environmental, economic, and social assessment methodologies and their various applications.
ObjectiveThis course has the aim of deepening students' knowledge of the environmental, economic and social assessment methodologies and their various applications.

In particular, students completing the course should have the
- ability to judge the scientific quality and reliability of environmental assessment studies, the appropriateness of inventory data and modelling, and the adequacy of life cycle impact assessment models and factors
- knowledge about the current state of the scientific discussion and new research developments
- ability to properly plan, conduct and interpret environmental assessment studies

In the course element "Implementation of Environmental and other Sustainability Goals", students will learn to
- describe key sustainability problems of the current economic system and measuring units.
- describe the management system of an organisation and how to develop a sustainability orientation
- discuss approaches to measure environmental performance of an organisation, including 'organisational LCA' (Ecobalance)
- explain the pros and cons of single score environmental assessment methods
- demonstrate life cycle costing
- interpret stakeholder relations of an organisation
- (if time allows) describe sustainable supply chain management and stakeholder management
ContentPart I (Advanced Environmental Assessments)
- Inventory database developments, transparency, data quality, data completeness, and data exchange formats, uncertainties
- Software tools (MFA, LCA)
- Allocation (multioutput processes and recycling)
- Hybrid LCA methods.
- Consequential and marginal analysis
- Impact assessment of waterborne chemical emissions, sum parameters, mixture toxicity
- Spatial differentiation in Life Cycle Assessment
- Workplace and indoor exposure in Risk and Life Cycle Assessment
- Subjectivity in environmental assessments
- Multicriteria Decision Analysis
- Case Studies

Part II (Implementation of Environmental and other Sustainability Goals):
- Sustainability problems of the current economic system and its measuring units;
- The structure of a management system, and elements to integrate environmental management (ISO 14001) and social management (SA8000 as well as ISO 26000), especially into strategy development, planning, controlling and communication;
- Sustainability Opportunities and Innovation
- The concept of 'Continuous Improvement'
- Life Cycle Costing, Life Cycle Management
- environmental performance measurement of an organisation, including 'organisational LCA' (Ecobalance), based on practical examples of companies and new concepts
- single score env. assessment methods (Swiss ecopoints)
- stakeholder management and sustainability oriented communication
- an intro into sustainability issues of supply chain management
Students will get small excercises related to course issues.
Lecture notesPart I: Slides and background reading material will be available on lecture homepage
Part II: Documents will be available on Ilias
LiteratureWill be made available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course should only be elected by students of environmental engineering with a with a Module in Ecological Systems Design. All other students should take the individual courses in Advanced Environmental Assessment and/or Implementation of Environmental and other Sustainability goals (with or without exercise and lab).

Basic knowledge of environmental assessment tools is a prerequisite for this class. Students who have not yet had classwork in this topic are required to read an appropriate textbook before or at the beginning of this course (e.g. Jolliet, O et al. (2016). Environmental Life Cycle Assessment. CRC Press, Boca Raton - London - New York. ISBN 978-1-4398-8766-0 (Chapters 2-5.2)).
102-0317-03LAdvanced Environmental Assessment (Computer Lab I)O1 credit1US. Pfister
AbstractDifferent tools and software used for environmental assessments, such as LCA are introduced. The students will have hands-on exercises in the computer rooms and will gain basic knowledge on how to apply the software and other resources in practice
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with various software programs for environmental assessment including Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental Risk Assessment, Probabilistic Modeling, Material Flow Analysis.
Groundwater
Module is offered in FS.
Waste Management
Remark: 102-0337-00 Landfilling, Contaminated Sites and Radioactive Waste Repositories only for those students also taking module "System Analysis in Urban Water Management" as replacement of 102-0217-00 Process Engineering Ia in module "Waste Management".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0357-00LWaste Recycling TechnologiesO3 credits2GR. Bunge
AbstractWaste Recycling Technology (WRT) is a sub-discipline of Mechanical Process Engineering. WRT is employed in production plants processing contaminated soil, construction wastes, scrap metal, recovered paper and the like. While WRT is well established in Central Europe, it is only just now catching on in emerging markets as well.
ObjectiveAt the core of this course is the separation of mixtures of solid bulk materials according to physical properties such as color, electrical conductivity, magnetism and so forth. After having taken this course, the students should have concept not only of the unit operations employed in WRT but also of how these unit operations are integrated into the flow sheets of production plants.
ContentIntroduction
Waste Recycling: Scope and objectives
Waste recycling technologies in Switzerland

Fundamentals
Properties of particles: Liberation conditions, Particle size and shape, Porosity of bulk materials
Fluid dynamics of particles: Stationary particle beds, Fluidized beds, Free settling particles
Flow sheet basics: Balancing mass flows
Standard processes: batch vs. continuous …
Assessment of separation success: Separation function; grade vs. recovery

Separation Processes
Separation according to size and shape (Classification): Screening, Flow separation
Separation according to material properties (Concentration): Manual Sorting, Gravity concentration; Magnetic separation, Eddy current separation, Electrostatic separation, Sensor technology, Froth flotation
Lecture notesThe script consists of the slides shown during the lectures. Background material will be provided on the script-server.
LiteratureA list of recommended books will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe topic will be discussed not from the perspective of theory, but rather in the context of practical application. However, solid fundamentals in physics (in particular in mechanics) are strongly recommended.
102-0337-00LLandfilling, Contaminated Sites and Radioactive Waste Repositories Restricted registration - show details
Only for Environmental Engineering MSc.
O3 credits2GM. Plötze, W. Hummel
AbstractPractices of landfilling and remediation of contaminated sites and disposal of radioactive waste are based on the same concepts that aim to protect the environment. The assessment of contaminants that may leach into the environment as a function of time and how to reduce the rate of their release is key to the design of chemical, technical and geological barriers.
ObjectiveUpon successful completion of this course students are able to:
- assess the risk posed to the environment of landfills, contaminated sites and radioactive waste repositories in terms of fate and transport of contaminants
- describe technologies available to minimize environmental contamination
- describe the principles in handling of contaminated sites and to propose and evaluate suitable remediation techniques
- explain the concepts that underlie radioactive waste disposal practices
ContentThis lecture course comprises of lectures with exercises and guided case studies.
- A short overview of the principles of environmental protection in waste management and how this is applied in legislation.
- A overview of the chemistry underlying the release and transport of contaminants from the landfilled/contaminated material/radioactive waste repository focusing on processes that control redox state and pH buffer capacity; mobility of heavy metals and organic compounds
- Technical barrier design and function. Clay as a barrier.
- Contaminated site remediation: Site evaluation, remediation technologies
- Concepts and safety in radioactive waste management
- Role of the geological and engineered barriers and radionuclide transport in geological media.
Lecture notesShort script plus copies of overheads
LiteratureLiterature will be made available.
102-0217-00LProcess Engineering Ia Information O3 credits2GE. Morgenroth
AbstractBiological processes used in wastewater treatment, organic waste management, biological resource recovery. Focus on fundamental principles of biological processes and process design based on kinetic and stoichiometric principles. Processes include anaerobic digestion for biogas production and aerobic wastewater treatment.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to evaluate and design biological processes. Develop simple mathematical models to simulate treatment processes.
ContentStoichiometry
Microbial transformation processes
Introduction to design and modeling of activated sludge processes
Anaerobic processes, industrial applications, sludge stabilization
Lecture notesCopies of overheads will be made available.
LiteratureThere will be a required textbook that students need to purchase (see Link for further information).
Prerequisites / NoticeFor detailed information on prerequisites and information needed from Systems Analysis and Mathematical Modeling the student should consult the lecture program and important information (syllabus) of Process Engineering Ia that can be downloaded at Link
Water Resources Management
102-0468-00 Watershed Modelling (3CP) and 102-0237-00 Hydrology II (3CP) for the last time in HS20 and only for students in exceptional cases.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
102-0468-10LWatershed Modelling Information O6 credits4GP. Molnar, N. Peleg
AbstractWatershed Modelling is a practical course on numerical water balance models for a range of catchment-scale water resource applications. The course covers GIS use in watershed analysis, models types from conceptual to physically-based, parameter calibration and model validation, and analysis of uncertainty. The course combines theory (lectures) with a series of practical tasks (exercises).
ObjectiveThe main aim of the course is to provide practical training with watershed models for environmental engineers. The course is built on thematic lectures (2 hrs a week) and practical exercises (2 hrs a week). Theory and concepts in the lectures are underpinned by many examples from scientific studies. A comprehensive exercise block builds on the lectures with a series of 5 practical tasks to be conducted during the semester in group work. Exercise hours during the week focus on explanation of the tasks. The course is evaluated 50% by performance in the graded exercises and 50% by a semester-end oral examination (30 mins) on watershed modelling concepts.
ContentThe first part (A) of the course is on watershed properties analysed from DEMs, and on global sources of hydrological data for modelling applications. Here students learn about GIS applications (ArcGIS, Q-GIS) in hydrology - flow direction routines, catchment morphometry, extracting river networks, and defining hydrological response units. In the second part (B) of the course on conceptual watershed models students build their own simple bucket model (Matlab, Python), they learn about performance measures in modelling, how to calibrate the parameters and how to validate models, about methods to simulate stochastic climate to drive models, uncertainty analysis. The third part (C) of the course is focussed on physically-based model components. Here students learn about components for soil water fluxes and evapotranspiration, they practice with a fully-distributed physically-based model Topkapi-ETH, and learn about other similar models. They apply Topkapi-ETH to an alpine catchment and study simulated discharge, snow, soil moisture and evapotranspiration spatial patterns. The final part (D) of the course provides open classroom discussion and simulation of a round-table discussion between modellers and clients about using watershed models in a case study.
Lecture notesThere is no textbook. Learning materials consist of (a) video-recording of lectures; (b) lecture presentations; and (c) exercise task documents that allow independent work.
LiteratureLiterature consist of collections from standard hydrological textbooks and research papers, collected by the instructors on the course moodle page.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic Hydrology in Bachelor Studies (engineering, environmental sciences, earth sciences). Basic knowledge of Matlab (Python), ArcGIS (Q-GIS).
102-0468-00LWatershed Modelling Information O3 credits2GP. Molnar
AbstractIntroduction to watershed modelling with applications of GIS in hydrology, the use of semi- and fully-distributed continuous watershed models, and their calibration and validation. The course contains substantive practical modelling experience in several assignments.
ObjectiveWatershed Modelling is a course in the Master of Science in Environmental Engineering Programme. It is a practical course in which the students learn to (a) use GIS in hydrological applications, (b) calibrate and validate models, (c) apply and interpret semi- and fully- distributed continuous watershed models, and (d) discuss several modelling case studies. This course is a follow up of Hydrology 2 and requires solid computer skills.
Content- Introduction to watershed modelling
- GIS in watershed modelling (ArcGIS exercise)
- Calibration and validation of models
- Semi-distributed modelling with PRMS (model description, application)
- Distributed watershed modelling with TOPKAPI (model description, application)
- Modelling applications and case studies (climate change scenarios, land use change, basin erosion)
Literature- Lecture presentations
- Exercise documentation
- Relevant scientific papers
all posted on the course website
Prerequisites / Notice102-0468-00 Watershed Modelling (3CP) and 102-0237-00 Hydrology II (3CP) for the last time in HS20 and only for students in exceptional cases.
Major Water Resources Management
Flow and Transport
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0267-01LNumerical HydraulicsO3 credits2GM. Holzner
AbstractIn the course Numerical Hydraulics the basics of numerical modelling of flows are presented.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to develop the understanding of the students for numerical simulation of flows to an extent that they can later use commercial software in a responsible and critical way.
ContentThe basic equations are derived from first principles. Possible simplifications relevant for practical problems are shown and their applicability is discussed. Using the example of non-steady state pipe flow numerical methods such as the method of characteristics and finite difference methods are introduced. The finite volume method as well as the method of characteristics are used for the solution of the shallow water equations. Special aspects such as wave propagation and turbulence modelling are also treated.

All methods discussed are applied pratically in exercises. This is done using programs in MATLAB which partially are programmed by the students themselves. Further, some generelly available softwares such as BASEMENT for non-steady shallow water flows are used.
Lecture notesLecture notes, powerpoints shown in the lecture and programs used can be downloaded. They are also available in German.
LiteratureGiven in lecture
102-0259-00LEcohydraulics and Habitat ModellingO3 credits2GR. Stocker, K.‑D. Jorde, L. G. Martins da Silva, A. Siviglia
AbstractAt a time in which humans have significantly affected the natural environment and yet society increasingly values the many services of natural ecosystems, accounting for ecological processes in engineering design is a major contemporary challenge for environmental and civil engineers.
ObjectiveThis is the fundamental topic in ecohydraulics, the discipline that focuses on the consequences of fluid flow and related physical processes on the organisms that inhabit aquatic environments. While still a young science, ecohydraulics already endows the engineer with an overall understanding and quantitative tools to predict how physical processes shape habitat quality and quantity, enabling the analysis of different management options for natural and man-made water bodies in terms of their ecosystem consequences.
ContentThis class will take a broad view of ecohydraulics and introduce students to key concepts in aquatic habitat modeling. Recognizing that an ecosystem is composed of diverse organisms with different seasonal habitat requirements across a range of scales, the class will focus on multiple representative groups of organisms, including fish, macroinvertebrates, plankton, and vegetation. The lectures will build on the students' knowledge of hydraulics, to give them both an appreciation for the dependence of organisms on their physical environment and a set of quantitative modeling approaches that they can take with them into engineering practice, in fields ranging from hydropower development and upgrade, to reservoir operation, river restoration, flood protection, water management and beyond. At the broadest scale, this class will contribute to the students' appreciation of the tight link between the natural and the built or impacted environment, and of the imperatives of considering both in the design process.
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